none
Windows XP licensing on Windows 8 and Beyond RRS feed

  • Question

  • Good afternoon,

    I've read all I can find about licensing Windows XP and can't seem to find accurate information on what is required to legally run Windows XP within a Windows 8, 8.1 or 10 environment. I've found a number of different ways to make this happen using VirtualBox and Hyper-V, but I want to make sure this is done legally.

    Most recently, I have installed VirtualBox and am running the VirtualXP.VHD extracted from the standard WindowsXP mode Microsoft download, combined with a VMLite pcbios.bin to avoid the Windows activation, but I am not willing to do this if it is not perfectly legal.

    I have also collected a number of Windows XP licenses from retired laptops, but I have not been able to actually use these license keys for activation, at least not with the VirtualXP VHD under VirtualBox.

    So, in the end, I believe the possibilities are as follows;

    * Run as described above,

    * Find a way to use the XP licenses I have with the above scenario, or

    * Create new Virtual Machines from scratch and install Windows XP using original media and their associated license keys.

    Again, doing this legally is of the utmost importance. Can anyone tell me exactly what I need to do here to say licensed? Thanks in advance!

    Respectfully,
    Marshall

    Thursday, March 10, 2016 6:14 PM

Answers

  • >(meaning Windows 8 and 10, right?)
     
    No, he means Windows 7 Pro, Windows 7 Ent, or Windows 10 Ult.  XP Mode is
    only license to run on these 3 OS versions, nothing after them.
     
    >Based on what you're saying here, I'm not sure whether or not I can legally run a Windows XP Mode virtual on my Windows 8 machines without having a license.
     
    That's a definite no, you would need a full XP license and a full XP
    install.  (XP Mode was kind of special)
     
    I know, it's a bummer and I wish that it weren't that way too, but it is
    what it is.  Windows 7 will run and be supported for some time to come,
    though you have to force it to stay there rather than auto-upgrading.
     
     
    • Marked as answer by MBCDev Wednesday, March 16, 2016 10:24 AM
    Friday, March 11, 2016 3:54 PM

All replies

  • According to this article, if you are running a Professional version or higher of the 7/8/10 OS, the licenses allows you to run 1 virtual machine without having to purchase an extra license. This would allow you to have 1 Virtual XP machine. I am pretty sure that is correct. I worked for  Microsoft reseller a few years ago and unless that has changed you should be OK with 1 virtual machine. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find any documentation from Microsoft on this and searching for Windows 8 and 10 info is even worse than info for Windows 7. I believe you will be fine as long as you follow the same rules for Windows 7 stated in this article.

    http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Mastering-the-dark-art-of-Windows-virtual-desktop-licensing

    Licensing Windows virtual desktops -- for free
    Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate include a free license for XP Mode, which lets IT run a Windows XP virtual machine atop of Windows 7. Organizations need Microsoft's Virtual PC and a special copy of Windows XP -- both of which can be downloaded from Microsoft.


    Please remember to select Mark as Answer if someone provides the answer or mark as helpful if the response helps to lead you in the right direction.

    Thursday, March 10, 2016 7:03 PM
  • Hello! First of all, thanks for your response!

    This article states that Windows 7 includes a license for XP Mode, which I've read in a number of places, but does not say anything about later versions of Windows, specifically 8, 8.1 and 10, which is where our organization is rapidly heading.

    Does anyone know with any certainty that this same arrangement applies for later releases of Windows?


    Thanks,
    Marshall
    Thursday, March 10, 2016 7:19 PM
  • The Windows XP Mode is a Windows 7 exclusive feature and does not apply to any other version of Windows.

    OEM licenses from any system are not transferable to any other platform.  Only Retail versions of Windows may be transferred to a different system.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ”

    Thursday, March 10, 2016 7:28 PM
  • After doing a little more digging I found that not only is XP mode no longer an option in Windows 8 and 10 but it is also not supported to run it as a VM since Windows XP is not supported in any way shape or form and has not been for a while, which I knew.  It is only a legal free option under Windows 7. On any other version you must use Hyper-V or Virtual box then install and provide your own already purchased Windows XP license. You cannot buy anymore XP licenses. This is also not a supported configuration so if you have any issues you are completely on your own. If you already have a license key you can use that, otherwise installing it and running it as a VM under Windows 8 and 10 will not be legal.

    Please remember to select Mark as Answer if someone provides the answer or mark as helpful if the response helps to lead you in the right direction.






    Thursday, March 10, 2016 8:02 PM
  • According to this article, if you are running a Professional version or higher of the 7/8/10 OS, the licenses allows you to run 1 virtual machine without having to purchase an extra license. This would allow you to have 1 Virtual XP machine. I am pretty sure that is correct. I worked for  Microsoft reseller a few years ago and unless that has changed you should be OK with 1 virtual machine. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find any documentation from Microsoft on this and searching for Windows 8 and 10 info is even worse than info for Windows 7. I believe you will be fine as long as you follow the same rules for Windows 7 stated in this article.

    http://searchvirtualdesktop.techtarget.com/tip/Mastering-the-dark-art-of-Windows-virtual-desktop-licensing

    Licensing Windows virtual desktops -- for free
    Windows 7 Professional or Ultimate include a free license for XP Mode, which lets IT run a Windows XP virtual machine atop of Windows 7. Organizations need Microsoft's Virtual PC and a special copy of Windows XP -- both of which can be downloaded from Microsoft.


    Please remember to select Mark as Answer if someone provides the answer or mark as helpful if the response helps to lead you in the right direction.

    This is incorrect.  Windows 7 Pro, 7 Enterprise, and 7 Ultimate  allow you 1 XP mode license, not a any "virtual machine."

    There are no "free" licenses included with Windows 8 or 10.  If you want to install a Windows VM, you need to provide the license. 

    There are no restrictions on the number virtual machines you can run on your host computer, you can run any number of Linux VMs, Windows VMs are limited by your licensing for Windows. 

    edited Windows versions for clarity
    • Edited by essjae Tuesday, March 15, 2016 5:09 AM added explict windows versions
    Friday, March 11, 2016 12:51 AM
  • Hello,

    I'm not sure I understand your answer smjain - on one hand you say Windows 7 Pro and above (meaning Windows 8 and 10, right?) allow you 1 XP mode license, and then you say there are no free licenses included with Windows 8 or 10.

    Based on what you're saying here, I'm not sure whether or not I can legally run a Windows XP Mode virtual on my Windows 8 machines without having a license.

    Thanks,

    Marshall

    Friday, March 11, 2016 2:34 PM
  • According to this site all support of Windows XP mode has ended and it is no longer supported. Under Windows 7 it was valid to run a copy of windows XP under 7 to help with the XP transition to Windows 7. This is no longer valid or supported as an option in Windows 8 and above. You can still run it as a VM if you want but you cannot do it without having a license for XP while running it as a HyperV. Since you cannot buy licenses for XP anymore you would have to use an existing license that you already own. If you do not have an XP licenses already you cannot do it legally. It is also not recommended or supported.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/install-and-use-windows-xp-mode-in-windows-7

    According to this site, the license for XP mode in Windows 7 was preinstalled.

    Licensing Considerations

    There are no special licensing requirements for using Windows XP Mode; it is free if you have Windows 7 Premium, Windows 7 Enterprise, or Windows 7 Ultimate. For more information, see Install and use Windows XP Mode in Windows 7.

    https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg699693.aspx

    But that free license is not valid under Windows 8 and 10 because it is no longer a supported option from what I have been reading in other forums.

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/windows/en-US/a0a8ccd4-6f54-41bc-b679-7ae23ac1e653/windows-xp-mode-on-windows-8-pro?forum=w8itprovirt


    Please remember to select Mark as Answer if someone provides the answer or mark as helpful if the response helps to lead you in the right direction.



    Friday, March 11, 2016 2:55 PM
  • >(meaning Windows 8 and 10, right?)
     
    No, he means Windows 7 Pro, Windows 7 Ent, or Windows 10 Ult.  XP Mode is
    only license to run on these 3 OS versions, nothing after them.
     
    >Based on what you're saying here, I'm not sure whether or not I can legally run a Windows XP Mode virtual on my Windows 8 machines without having a license.
     
    That's a definite no, you would need a full XP license and a full XP
    install.  (XP Mode was kind of special)
     
    I know, it's a bummer and I wish that it weren't that way too, but it is
    what it is.  Windows 7 will run and be supported for some time to come,
    though you have to force it to stay there rather than auto-upgrading.
     
     
    • Marked as answer by MBCDev Wednesday, March 16, 2016 10:24 AM
    Friday, March 11, 2016 3:54 PM
  • Bob Comer! I've read a number of your posts on this subject and was hoping you'd chime in!

    Ok, so at this point I'm pretty much convinced that the best way to move forward is to scrap the Windows XP plan altogether and purchase Windows 7 licenses with an accompanying CoA for each, which I will run within VirtualBox.

    I should probably mention at this point the purpose of this project - our support team oftentimes has to connect to various customers by way of VPN. Some customer's VPNs force a local LAN disconnection for security reasons. This is fine, except it then removes our support personnel's access to email, local file shares, etc. I set up XP Mode a few years ago within VirtualBox so they could connect to the VPN but still maintain their local LAN connection. This has worked perfectly well, but now that our standard support team member build is Windows 8.1, soon to be 10, I thought we might have to do something different.

    In any case, if we do go with a Windows 7 virtual under VirtualBox, can I just purchase a handful of Windows 7 licenses (see the link below) and use them in this manner, or is there a different license I need in order to stay above board?

    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Windows-7-Professional-PRO-64-Bit-by-Microsoft-Full-Version-Upgrade-SP1-w-COA-/252286053185?hash=item3abd6bab41:g:X14AAOSwgNRV8GSX

    Thanks again for your input!

    Respectfully,

    Marshall

    Friday, March 11, 2016 4:32 PM
  • >Ok, so at this point I'm pretty much convinced that the best way to move forward is to scrap the Windows XP plan altogether and purchase Windows 7 licenses with an accompanying CoA for each, which I will run within VirtualBox.
     
    Not a bad way to go.  XP really isn't supported anymore anyway, and it's
    not that robust compared to something newer.
     
    If you really need XP Mode for some reason, it'll run inside a Windows 7
    Pro VM.  (A bit slow, but it works)
     
    >In any case, if we do go with a Windows 7 virtual under VirtualBox, can I just purchase a handful of Windows 7 licenses (see the link below) and use them in this manner, or is there a different license I need in order to stay above board?
     
    That's beyond what I know.  If they are real licenses, I'd probably say
    yes, but knowing they're real,  hard to tell.
     
    As for your usage of a VM, that's a good way to go, I do the same thing for
    the same reason occasionally, but I'm more likely to use the VM to connect
    to the VPN to keep it isolated from my main environment.  Of course you
    have to install what you need in the VM, but if it's not complicated, it
    works well.
     
    Glad I could help!
     
    Friday, March 11, 2016 4:54 PM
  • Hi,

    We haven’t heard from you in a couple of days, have you solved the problem? We are looking forward to your good news.

    Best Regards,
    Tao


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, March 14, 2016 1:11 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks for clarifying Bob!!!
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 5:08 AM
  • Most definitely - thank you for the assistance! I just marked your original post as the answer, hope I did this correctly!

    Thanks again,
    Marshall

    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 10:25 AM