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Why a DNS if using RDP server? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I just installed the 2012R2 120 day demo in a virtual machine to practice with.  I noticed that when I went to enable RDP server (Terminal services or Remote Desktop services) that it said I have to have a DNS installed too. 

    Question:  why?

    Is this something new?  My customers with Windows servers only have one server, so no fall over.  And I always use a fixed I.P. on my servers (lock the MAC address into the DHCP daemon too).  When I have configured RDP clients (rdesktip, mstsc, etc.) I have always used the straight I.P. address of the RDP server.  I really, really like to keep my Windows servers as simple as possible.  If not necessary, I really don't want them running a DNS server.  (Usually, if I run an internal DNS, I run BIND as a caching server and link it to a DHCP server daemon over on a Red Hat server.  Very fast and very slick.  You have to learn "vi", the text editor from h--- though.)

    Many thanks,

    -T

    Wednesday, January 22, 2014 7:39 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Firstly agree with “Tim” reply, when you setup AD and configure domain then it needs to have DNS to work with. “Active Directory is dependent on DNS as a domain controller location mechanism and uses DNS domain naming conventions in the architecture of Active Directory domains. Active Directory domains have two types of names: DNS names and NetBIOS names.”

    For better understanding the concept for AD and DNS here providing you article. Please go through it.
    How DNS Support for Active Directory Works
    Configure a DNS Server for Use with Active Directory Domain Services

    As per my knowledge “RDS” is not typo by Tim. RDS is called Remote Desktop Service. you can try to understand Remote Desktop service in more brief way by below link.
    Remote Desktop Services Overview

    Apart from this found, similar thread like you can refer this thread.

    Hope it helps!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh
    Thursday, January 23, 2014 6:41 AM
    Moderator
  • "Was "RDS" a typo?"

    As the others have pointed out, no, it is not a typo.  Interesting that you should question it because even you used the full term in your original post. "enable RDP server (Terminal services or Remote Desktop services)"

    With the release of Windows Server 2008, the term 'Terminal Services' was deprecated for the more accurate 'Remote Desktop Services'.

    Also, as mentioned by Bruno, RDP is the protocol used by the Remote Desktop Client (RDC) to access the RDS.  RDP is built into every Windows client and server operating system.  As part of the operating system license, Microsoft grants the right of one remote desktop session on client and two remote desktop sessions on server for administrative purposes.  If the purpose of using RDP to connect to a server is to run applications instead of administer the machine, that requires the purchase of an RDS CAL, whether or not you actually set up an RDS server.  There is no CAL required for the administrative access.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 1:05 PM
  • Hi,

    For configuring DHCP with AD, here providing article link for better understanding. 

    Step-by-Step: Configure DHCP Using Policy-based Assignment (For server 2012)

    In addition for better understanding concept, refer beneath article link.
    Configuring DHCP Server Role Settings

    Hope it helps to understand!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh
    Friday, January 24, 2014 1:47 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • RDS also requires Active Directory, which also requires DNS.  Of course, you can run DNS for a domain on a bind server - it just takes more to set up and requires additional management afterwards because it is not integrated with AD.

    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Wednesday, January 22, 2014 7:52 PM
  • RDS also requires Active Directory, which also requires DNS.  Of course, you can run DNS for a domain on a bind server - it just takes more to set up and requires additional management afterwards because it is not integrated with AD.

    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Hi Tim,

    Was "RDS" a typo?

    So, if I don't install Active Directory (AD) and just use standard user accounts, then RDP without DNS.  But if I use AD, then I have to use DNS.  Thank you.  That answers another question about setting up AD for a customer that wants to be able to do and see anything from any workstation.  (He thinks he can do it with an i3 server, one 4 G memory stick, an a SATA 300 drive too.  Oh DUDE!)

    Why DNS for AD?  Does AD need to know the I.P.'s of the workstations?  Why does it need to know anything I.P. wise about anyone else except itself?  (I really want to keep things simple.)

    Many thanks,

    -T



    Wednesday, January 22, 2014 8:07 PM
  • Hi,

    Firstly agree with “Tim” reply, when you setup AD and configure domain then it needs to have DNS to work with. “Active Directory is dependent on DNS as a domain controller location mechanism and uses DNS domain naming conventions in the architecture of Active Directory domains. Active Directory domains have two types of names: DNS names and NetBIOS names.”

    For better understanding the concept for AD and DNS here providing you article. Please go through it.
    How DNS Support for Active Directory Works
    Configure a DNS Server for Use with Active Directory Domain Services

    As per my knowledge “RDS” is not typo by Tim. RDS is called Remote Desktop Service. you can try to understand Remote Desktop service in more brief way by below link.
    Remote Desktop Services Overview

    Apart from this found, similar thread like you can refer this thread.

    Hope it helps!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh
    Thursday, January 23, 2014 6:41 AM
    Moderator
  • RDS also requires Active Directory, which also requires DNS.  Of course, you can run DNS for a domain on a bind server - it just takes more to set up and requires additional management afterwards because it is not integrated with AD.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Hi Tim,

    Was "RDS" a typo?

    So, if I don't install Active Directory (AD) and just use standard user accounts, then RDP without DNS.  But if I use AD, then I have to use DNS.  Thank you.  That answers another question about setting up AD for a customer that wants to be able to do and see anything from any workstation.  (He thinks he can do it with an i3 server, one 4 G memory stick, an a SATA 300 drive too.  Oh DUDE!)

    Why DNS for AD?  Does AD need to know the I.P.'s of the workstations?  Why does it need to know anything I.P. wise about anyone else except itself?  (I really want to keep things simple.)

    Many thanks,

    -T



    Not a typo. RDS is remote desktop services. RDP is remote desktop protocol. These names are both used when discussing a server which hosts remote desktops.

    Now, running AD on an i3 will not be a problem with 4GB of ram. If all he has is a small domain with a handful of clients, it will be more than fast enough.

    AD needs DNS because Windows uses DNS to locate AD resources. For example, when a workstation wants to perform a logon, it will contact the DNS server to request the IP address of a computer providing domain controller functionalities (such as kerberos for example). Or when domain controllers need to replicate, they use DNS to locate each other. AD depends on DNS completely.

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 7:12 AM
  • "Was "RDS" a typo?"

    As the others have pointed out, no, it is not a typo.  Interesting that you should question it because even you used the full term in your original post. "enable RDP server (Terminal services or Remote Desktop services)"

    With the release of Windows Server 2008, the term 'Terminal Services' was deprecated for the more accurate 'Remote Desktop Services'.

    Also, as mentioned by Bruno, RDP is the protocol used by the Remote Desktop Client (RDC) to access the RDS.  RDP is built into every Windows client and server operating system.  As part of the operating system license, Microsoft grants the right of one remote desktop session on client and two remote desktop sessions on server for administrative purposes.  If the purpose of using RDP to connect to a server is to run applications instead of administer the machine, that requires the purchase of an RDS CAL, whether or not you actually set up an RDS server.  There is no CAL required for the administrative access.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Thursday, January 23, 2014 1:05 PM
  • "Was "RDS" a typo?"

    As the others have pointed out, no, it is not a typo.  Interesting that you should question it because even you used the full term in your original post. "enable RDP server (Terminal services or Remote Desktop services)"

    With the release of Windows Server 2008, the term 'Terminal Services' was deprecated for the more accurate 'Remote Desktop Services'.


    .:|:.:|:. tim

    Hi Tim,

    I use the temp RCP as I do most of my server work outside Windows.  Here is my last configuration:

    xrdp: An open source remote desktop protocol (rdp) server: http://xrdp.org/

    One of these days I will keep up with all the latest marketing terms

    Thank you for the run down.

    -T

    Friday, January 24, 2014 1:19 AM
  • Hi,

    Firstly agree with “Tim” reply, when you setup AD and configure domain then it needs to have DNS to work with. “Active Directory is dependent on DNS as a domain controller location mechanism and uses DNS domain naming conventions in the architecture of Active Directory domains. Active Directory domains have two types of names: DNS names and NetBIOS names.”

    For better understanding the concept for AD and DNS here providing you article. Please go through it.
    How DNS Support for Active Directory Works
    Configure a DNS Server for Use with Active Directory Domain Services

    Hope it helps!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh

    Hi Dharmesh,

    That you for the great links.

    Is there a way to link your DHCP server with AD's use of a DNS?

    -T

    Friday, January 24, 2014 1:23 AM
  • Hi,

    For configuring DHCP with AD, here providing article link for better understanding. 

    Step-by-Step: Configure DHCP Using Policy-based Assignment (For server 2012)

    In addition for better understanding concept, refer beneath article link.
    Configuring DHCP Server Role Settings

    Hope it helps to understand!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh
    Friday, January 24, 2014 1:47 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    For configuring DHCP with AD, here providing article link for better understanding. 

    Step-by-Step: Configure DHCP Using Policy-based Assignment (For server 2012)

    In addition for better understanding concept, refer beneath article link.
    Configuring DHCP Server Role Settings

    Hope it helps to understand!

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh

    Hi Dharmesh,

    Thank you.  I have some reading to do.  

    I keep thinking this all might go easier on a reduced function Samba server.  There is a reason why the Samba crowd has stayed away from emulating AD.  But, got some reading to do,

    -T

    Friday, January 24, 2014 2:01 AM
  • Hi,

    How is evrything going on? Do you need any other assistance? 

    Thanks,
    Dharmesh
    Monday, January 27, 2014 1:19 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Dharmesh,

       Doing great.  Thank you.

       RDS (RDP server) apparently now has the need for DNS written into it.  Theoretically, it should not have to, but that is not the way MS wrote it, so you are stuck with it.  I really, really like to keep my MS servers as simple as possible.

    -T

    Wednesday, January 29, 2014 7:26 PM