none
uneven distribution of work hours during a task RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I work in a business unit where about 10 project leaders dispatch the tasks of a little over 100 projects to a team of about 60 people. I'm currently building a master project for easy follow-ups for high management with all the subprojects linked to a single resource pool.

    now I've been testing and everything seems to work fine except for the work leveling.  it seems as though the only way for MS Project to level work is to move tasks, but in most cases, changing the allocated time on a task for it to be uneven between days would be more effective.  Is there a way for MS project to realize that a resource works 9 hours everyday on week 1 and 2 and only 6 hours per day on week three, so it could allocate 1h less on a task each day of the first 2 weeks and catch up on week 3 by working more per day.

    to summarize, is it possible for MSP to allocate the work hours this way to load level without changing end dates :

    task 1   |  3  |  3  |  3  |  3  |  3  |     W/E     |  3  |  3  |  3  |  3  |  3  |

    task 2   |  5  |  5  |  5  |  5  |  5  |     W/E     |  5  |  5  |  5  |  5  |  5  |     W/E     |  8  |  8  |  8  |  8  |  8  |

    this way, both tasks are completed with their planned total of 30h for task 1 and 90 for task 2 AND the end dates stay the same AND the resource isn't overallcated, as it would be with an even split of 6 hours per day on task 2.  to help answering, I work wish MS Project 2013 with task types set as fixed duration. 

    thank you!

    Thursday, March 16, 2017 2:47 PM

Answers

  • Baubbi,

    Sorry to deliver the bad news, but there is no "one click" solution. Project doesn't "realize" anything, it wasn't designed to "think".

    As I indicated in my initial response, you could set up the assignment level to best approximate the hours you want for the first two weeks and then manually adjust the third week. That would at least cut down the amount of manual adjustment. But if you want something automated, you would need to develop an algorithm and then implement it with VBA. Not a trivial task but doable.

    John

    • Marked as answer by Baubbi Friday, March 17, 2017 12:03 PM
    Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:59 PM

All replies

  • Baubbi,

    The only way for Project to "recognize" the varying work weeks of a resource is to customize the resource's calendar. Have you done that?

    However, your description talks about 9 hour workdays on week 1 and 2 but your example shows a normal 8 hour day for all three weeks. In order to get the uneven distribution for weeks 1 and 2 (i.e. 3 hours on task 1 and 5 hours on task 2) you can either manually adjust the hours (Resource or Task Usage view) for all three weeks, or set the unit level to give 3 and 5 hours on task 1 and 2 respectively for the first two weeks and then manually adjust the hours for the third week of task 2 for a full 8 hours.

    John

    Thursday, March 16, 2017 4:45 PM
  • Hi John,

    Thanks for the fast answer.  The example I showed in my question was the result I'd like to get after load leveling.  when I create my project and assign resources, the work hours are automatically split even for 3 hours/day on task 1 and 6 hours/day on task 2 with and overallocation warning.  I'm looking for a way so that MSP will automatically realize there's room in week 3 to compensate for weeks 1 and 2 and thus apply the result I posted earlier.

    The way the department is run, doing the changes by hand is just not an option, we really need to be able to just click a button and have the whole workload leveled for us.

    Thursday, March 16, 2017 8:37 PM
  • Baubbi,

    Sorry to deliver the bad news, but there is no "one click" solution. Project doesn't "realize" anything, it wasn't designed to "think".

    As I indicated in my initial response, you could set up the assignment level to best approximate the hours you want for the first two weeks and then manually adjust the third week. That would at least cut down the amount of manual adjustment. But if you want something automated, you would need to develop an algorithm and then implement it with VBA. Not a trivial task but doable.

    John

    • Marked as answer by Baubbi Friday, March 17, 2017 12:03 PM
    Thursday, March 16, 2017 10:59 PM
  • thank you, that's what I thought but I had to try and see if something was possible.
    Friday, March 17, 2017 12:04 PM
  • Baubbi,

    You're welcome and thanks for the feedback.

    John

    Friday, March 17, 2017 2:10 PM