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Exchange 2010 NAS Support RRS feed

Answers

  • NetApp isn’t “NAS which supports iSCSI”. NetApp is unified storage. You can have CIFS and NFS data as well as FC/FCoE/iSCSI within the same set of controllers. NAS is a file protocol and SAN is a block protocol. iSCSI is most certainly, as you say, not NAS.
     
    "steve siyavaya" wrote in message news:bd006dcd-bd5e-4332-9319-d059fe384017...

    iSCSI is supported but not NAS: technet.microsoft.com

    The difference would be iSCSI disks appear as directly attached storage whereas NAS would present as mapped drives.  NAS which supports iSCSI (e.g. NetApp) would be supported in iSCSI configuration.


    Mark Arnold, Exchange MVP.
    • Proposed as answer by Terence Yu Friday, January 27, 2012 1:22 AM
    • Marked as answer by Terence Yu Thursday, February 2, 2012 7:29 AM
    Thursday, January 26, 2012 1:13 PM
  • iSCSI works the same way as FC and FCoE. The only difference from a Windows Server perspective is that instead of FC HBAs you use normal NICs. You still carve up LUNs on the storage and you present them to the server. You present them using different terminology but you still present them in a logically understandable manner.
     
    For iSCSI, start the iSCSI Service in Windows and create a connection to the storage controller. Then either create the LUNs or attach to the LUNs if they are already created. At the most basic of levels that’s all there is to it. an iSCSI LUN can be a Hyper-V CSV just the same as other shared storage. It all depends what you want to do.
     
     
    "Viministrator" wrote in message news:c2e6623c-f2f6-447a-8ee0-b639c43e656a...

    totally agreed and this how I do most of the Exchange.

    But how does tht iSCSI works for Clusstered Exchange in virtual environment for a test lab.

    Single HYPer V host and two virtual guest and all on the same iSCSI. ?


    Where Technology Meets Talent

    Mark Arnold, Exchange MVP.
    • Proposed as answer by Terence Yu Friday, January 27, 2012 1:22 AM
    • Marked as answer by Terence Yu Thursday, February 2, 2012 7:29 AM
    Thursday, January 26, 2012 1:16 PM

All replies

  • Everything I have read would say that a NAS is not supported either in a physical or virtual environment.

    A NAS is not supported for Exchange directly, because you cannot put the databases on a network drive. You can only put it on local drives.

    The note you are referring to here: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee832792.aspx is just explaining what a NAS is, it does not in my view indicate support.

    Simon.

     


    Simon Butler, Exchange MVP
    Blog | Exchange Resources | In the UK? Hire Me.
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 4:20 PM
  • Exchange requires directly attached disks or true block storage (SAN). It is not possible to mount databases stored on any network shares.
    However, it is possible to put the EDB files into VMDK files and for the ESX host to reach those VMDKs over NFS. Whilst it is possible, it’s not supported. The Microsoft product support statement that you have seen is trying to call out that solution without saying as much. Many virtualization (VMware) customers are deploying that solution regardless of the support statement calling it out. So whilst I can’t suggest it, recommend it or otherwise support it, if you do want to go that path you are not alone.
     
     
    "Iban39" wrote in message news:1028e3b1-b337-4c7d-8109-08120be449ac...

    Hi!

    A custumer wants to deploy a physical Mailbox with NAS storage and they asked me if this scenary is supported. I have looked for this information but I am not sure what is the correct awser because the documentation is a bit confused.

    This link refers only for virtuak enviroments: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa996719.aspx.

    This other one refers the store supported and do not appear NAS in the table but there is a little note about NAS below the firts table: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee832792.aspx

    And the last one, The Exchange Product Blog says that NAS is not supported but it do not specify if is in phisycal or virtual environments: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2010/03/29/3409629.aspx

    Anyone knows if NAS is supported in phisycal servers based in Microsoft documentation?

    Thanks!

     



    Mark Arnold, Exchange MVP.
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 5:21 PM
  • So you are saying iSCSI is not supported on Exchange 2010? Is it only for exchange 2010 or Exchange 2007 too?
    Where Technology Meets Talent
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 7:32 PM
  • iSCSI is supported but not NAS: technet.microsoft.com

    The difference would be iSCSI disks appear as directly attached storage whereas NAS would present as mapped drives.  NAS which supports iSCSI (e.g. NetApp) would be supported in iSCSI configuration. 

    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 9:56 PM
  • totally agreed and this how I do most of the Exchange.

    But how does tht iSCSI works for Clusstered Exchange in virtual environment for a test lab. 

    Single HYPer V host and two virtual guest and all on the same iSCSI. ?


    Where Technology Meets Talent
    Wednesday, January 25, 2012 10:29 PM
  • NetApp isn’t “NAS which supports iSCSI”. NetApp is unified storage. You can have CIFS and NFS data as well as FC/FCoE/iSCSI within the same set of controllers. NAS is a file protocol and SAN is a block protocol. iSCSI is most certainly, as you say, not NAS.
     
    "steve siyavaya" wrote in message news:bd006dcd-bd5e-4332-9319-d059fe384017...

    iSCSI is supported but not NAS: technet.microsoft.com

    The difference would be iSCSI disks appear as directly attached storage whereas NAS would present as mapped drives.  NAS which supports iSCSI (e.g. NetApp) would be supported in iSCSI configuration.


    Mark Arnold, Exchange MVP.
    • Proposed as answer by Terence Yu Friday, January 27, 2012 1:22 AM
    • Marked as answer by Terence Yu Thursday, February 2, 2012 7:29 AM
    Thursday, January 26, 2012 1:13 PM
  • iSCSI works the same way as FC and FCoE. The only difference from a Windows Server perspective is that instead of FC HBAs you use normal NICs. You still carve up LUNs on the storage and you present them to the server. You present them using different terminology but you still present them in a logically understandable manner.
     
    For iSCSI, start the iSCSI Service in Windows and create a connection to the storage controller. Then either create the LUNs or attach to the LUNs if they are already created. At the most basic of levels that’s all there is to it. an iSCSI LUN can be a Hyper-V CSV just the same as other shared storage. It all depends what you want to do.
     
     
    "Viministrator" wrote in message news:c2e6623c-f2f6-447a-8ee0-b639c43e656a...

    totally agreed and this how I do most of the Exchange.

    But how does tht iSCSI works for Clusstered Exchange in virtual environment for a test lab.

    Single HYPer V host and two virtual guest and all on the same iSCSI. ?


    Where Technology Meets Talent

    Mark Arnold, Exchange MVP.
    • Proposed as answer by Terence Yu Friday, January 27, 2012 1:22 AM
    • Marked as answer by Terence Yu Thursday, February 2, 2012 7:29 AM
    Thursday, January 26, 2012 1:16 PM