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How is Hyper-V different from Virtual pc and Virtual server. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,
     
    How is Hyper-V different from Virtual pc and Virtual server.

    What are the core differences.

    Regards
    Friday, August 1, 2008 4:28 AM

Answers

  • The core difference between Hyper-V and Virtual Server/VirtualPC is the first is a Type 1 (or bare metal) hypervisor and the latter are Type 2 (or hosted) hypervisors. (More info here)

    Other differences between virtualization infrastructure products can be found on http://www.it20.info/misc/virtualizationscomparison.htm.
    • Marked as answer by Sharathree Friday, August 1, 2008 6:03 AM
    Friday, August 1, 2008 5:23 AM
  • If your hardware truly isn't capable of running Hyper-V, you won't be able to enable the Hyper-V role. You will clearly receive an error message telling you that your hardware isn't capable. As I answered in your other post, you cannot rely on what these utilities tell you about Hyper-V capability. They do not always provide completely accurate results.


    Sharathree said:

    I ran secureable tool which said NO to the virtualization part. That means the machine is not capable.

    No it does not mean that. You have Hyper-V running, so it means that the tool is incorrect.


    I have 4 GB of ram and have 3 vm's and the base OS has 1 GB. I cannot install the 4th VM as the ram is alredy taken by the 3 vm's
    So is that not a draw back. even though the 3 vm's are taking just minimal ram . the remaining ram is idle which can be used for other vm's.
    Is there any workaround for this to use the waste ram's

    You cannot change the way ram allocation works. If you assign a certain amount of ram to a vm, that ram is restricted to use by the vm when the vm is running. If the vm is using less than the allocated ram, the unused ram cannot be redistributed to another running vm. However, if you decide a vm has more ram allocated than it will ever use, then you can shut it down and lower its ram allocation. This is how the product is designed. There is no workaround.
    • Marked as answer by Sharathree Friday, August 1, 2008 2:53 PM
    Friday, August 1, 2008 2:44 PM

All replies

  • The core difference between Hyper-V and Virtual Server/VirtualPC is the first is a Type 1 (or bare metal) hypervisor and the latter are Type 2 (or hosted) hypervisors. (More info here)

    Other differences between virtualization infrastructure products can be found on http://www.it20.info/misc/virtualizationscomparison.htm.
    • Marked as answer by Sharathree Friday, August 1, 2008 6:03 AM
    Friday, August 1, 2008 5:23 AM
  •   

    Hello,

     

    Here are the top differences:

     

    Hypervisor

     

    Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V has a completely different architecture than Virtual Server 2005.  The key difference is that Windows Server 2008 is a hypervisor based virtualization product.  This means that the guest operating systems and the parent operating systems interact with the hardware through a thin layer which provides hardware assisted virtualization.  The guest operating systems and parent operating system are now on essentially the "same playing field".  This has a very significant affect on performance of virtual machines, security (due to VM isolation), IO, and management.

     

    Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V will run on systems with 64 bit, hardware assisted virtualization (ex. Intel VT), and DEP.  The requirement for 64 bit sounds like a downside, but I've found it to be a blessing.  I've found that memory usually the biggest bottleneck for running more virtual machines on a single parent system.  The usage of a 64 bit operating system allows for very high memory scalability, meaning that many more virtual machines can be put on a single parent system.  Most of the servers (and workstations for that matter) that I've implemented in the last year support 64 bit.  The Hyper-V product also supports 64 bit child operating systems.

     

    In contrast, Virtual Server 2005 is not a hypervisor based virtualization engine.  Virtual Server 2005 essentially run "on top of" the parent operating system, which results in inferior performance and inefficient IO.   Virtual Server 2005 also does not support 64 bit child operating systems. 

     

    Quick Migration

     

    The Windows Server 2008 Hyper-V product supports Quick Migration in conjunction with failover clustering.  This feature provides high availability for virtual machines by allowing multiple parent systems to host the systems.

     

    Snapshot

     

    The Windows Server 2008 product supports snapshot and live backup capabilities (coming through DPM 2007 SP1).

     

    Here is a link to more Hyper-V information:

     

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/virtualization-consolidation.aspx

     

    Here is a link to the Microsoft Virtualization blog:

     

    http://blogs.technet.com/virtualization/

     

    Nathan Lasnoski

    http://nathanlasnoski.spaces.live.com/default.aspx

    Friday, August 1, 2008 12:59 PM
  • Hi,

    thanks for the explanation.
    2 questions
    As you say it can be installed on specisic hardware .
    What is the error i will get when its installed on a non compatable machine.
    Why i ask this is
    I ran secureable tool which said NO to the virtualization part. That means the machine is not capable.
    But i was successful in installing 3 vm's in the hyper-v enabled machine.

    another question is as you said ram.
    I have 4 GB of ram and have 3 vm's and the base OS has 1 GB. I cannot install the 4th VM as the ram is alredy taken by the 3 vm's
    So is that not a draw back. even though the 3 vm's are taking just minimal ram . the remaining ram is idle which can be used for other vm's.
    Is there any workaround for this to use the waste ram's
    Friday, August 1, 2008 2:32 PM
  • If your hardware truly isn't capable of running Hyper-V, you won't be able to enable the Hyper-V role. You will clearly receive an error message telling you that your hardware isn't capable. As I answered in your other post, you cannot rely on what these utilities tell you about Hyper-V capability. They do not always provide completely accurate results.


    Sharathree said:

    I ran secureable tool which said NO to the virtualization part. That means the machine is not capable.

    No it does not mean that. You have Hyper-V running, so it means that the tool is incorrect.


    I have 4 GB of ram and have 3 vm's and the base OS has 1 GB. I cannot install the 4th VM as the ram is alredy taken by the 3 vm's
    So is that not a draw back. even though the 3 vm's are taking just minimal ram . the remaining ram is idle which can be used for other vm's.
    Is there any workaround for this to use the waste ram's

    You cannot change the way ram allocation works. If you assign a certain amount of ram to a vm, that ram is restricted to use by the vm when the vm is running. If the vm is using less than the allocated ram, the unused ram cannot be redistributed to another running vm. However, if you decide a vm has more ram allocated than it will ever use, then you can shut it down and lower its ram allocation. This is how the product is designed. There is no workaround.
    • Marked as answer by Sharathree Friday, August 1, 2008 2:53 PM
    Friday, August 1, 2008 2:44 PM