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% Complete vs. Physical % Complete RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi! What will be more appropriate method to track work perform by a subcontractor,

    Task 1: Building a wall of 100m2

    Total Cost: U$S 10,000

    09-10-15, the subcontractor progress on the wall is  50m2. So I want to show the subcontractor has 50% progress on this task. What % do I use?

    He is supposed to finish in 10 days but on 09-10-15 he has 2 days remaining to finish the task on schedule. How do I track this?

    Thanks in advance!


    • Edited by isa7667 Friday, August 21, 2015 4:09 PM
    Friday, August 21, 2015 4:07 PM

Answers

  • isa7667 --

    Why not both?  The Percent Complete field actually measures the percentage of the Duration "used up" during the life of the task.  Physical Percent Complete measures the percentage of the physical object being created.  In your case, the Percent Complete would be 80% (8 of the 10 days have been used up) and the Physical Percent Complete would be 50%.  If you compare these two numbers, I would say this task is in jeopardy of finishing late unless the subcontractor adds more workers or mandates overtime work.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    • Marked as answer by isa7667 Friday, August 21, 2015 6:15 PM
    Friday, August 21, 2015 4:27 PM
    Moderator
  • FYI, Jim Askel wrote a good summary on the various %complete in Project.  http://www.msprojectblog.com/References/Celeris%20-%20Defining%20Percent%20Complete.pdf

    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    • Marked as answer by isa7667 Monday, August 24, 2015 12:29 PM
    Saturday, August 22, 2015 9:24 AM

All replies

  • isa7667 --

    Why not both?  The Percent Complete field actually measures the percentage of the Duration "used up" during the life of the task.  Physical Percent Complete measures the percentage of the physical object being created.  In your case, the Percent Complete would be 80% (8 of the 10 days have been used up) and the Physical Percent Complete would be 50%.  If you compare these two numbers, I would say this task is in jeopardy of finishing late unless the subcontractor adds more workers or mandates overtime work.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]

    • Marked as answer by isa7667 Friday, August 21, 2015 6:15 PM
    Friday, August 21, 2015 4:27 PM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Dale!! This is very helpful. I will use both measures. A couple of more questions,

    I sign a contract on 09-02-2015 and pay the contractor U$S 2,000 (20% of total).  (Time 0)

    The subcontractor starts working and makes some progress (finishes 1/2 of work) on 09-10-2015 (8 days after). Do you record this with % Physical Complete? (Time 1)

    At this point he ask for a second payment based on progress but he is running late. If he continues with this progress he will not finish on time. Do you anticipate this with the % Completion? 

    Do you create a baseline before any progress is made (Time 0), to keep track? Is it a good idea to use Earned Value Analysis?

    Thanks in advance!


    • Edited by isa7667 Friday, August 21, 2015 5:02 PM
    Friday, August 21, 2015 5:00 PM
  • FYI, Jim Askel wrote a good summary on the various %complete in Project.  http://www.msprojectblog.com/References/Celeris%20-%20Defining%20Percent%20Complete.pdf

    --rms www.rmschneider.com

    • Marked as answer by isa7667 Monday, August 24, 2015 12:29 PM
    Saturday, August 22, 2015 9:24 AM
  • Your question is a bit vague and you have not provided some of the essential information which would make it easier to assist, but here goes anyway, with assumptions made as required.

    You sign the contract on 2nd September. That's a task (or really an event that can be represented as a task) which has zero duration (so it is a milestone). Since it has actually happened in the past, instead of being scheduled to happen in the future, it has an actual start and an actual finish date, so this should be recorded in the tracking table.

    You made a payment. Again, this actually happened in the past, and had zero duration. This event had a cost which can be interpreted and represented as a fixed cost against that task in the cost table. Then use the tracking table to record when it actually occurred.

    Signing the contract is a FS0 predecessor of the the payment event.

    Both are FS0 predecessors of the task that the subbie does. Let's call it "Lay 10000 Bricks".
    You don't say what the estimated duration of the task is. Let's say it is 10 days.
    You don't say what the contract price is. Let's say that 80% of it is $4000.

    This task has the resource (the guy) assigned to it. He can be represented as a work type resource with a cost, std rate, of $4000/40 hours = $100/hour, where the 40 hours is 40 hours of work (not duration).

    By the end of the 10th September, the end of the 8th day, the status date, he has laid some bricks, 5000 of them. So instead of laying 1000 bricks/day he is laying 5000/8 = 625 bricks/day. 5000 bricks remain and at this rate it will take another 8 days to lay the remaining bricks. The remaining duration must be re-estimated to be not 2 days but 8 days. The 10 task which was planned to have a duration of 10 days now has a duration of 16 days, half actual, half remaining, and half the bricks are laid and half remain.

    What happens next depends on the nature of the contract. Will it cost you for the extra hours, or is the price fixed regardless?
    Saturday, August 22, 2015 9:34 AM