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Hosted Wifi Network (through laptop) suddenly not working RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey guys,

    I've been having a problem for a few days and have been looking everywhere for a solution with no luck thus far. I recently moved in with my girlfriend and my internet plan didn't include a router. Since she's not going to stay here for long (just til the end of the year), I've been routing the net from the cable modem through my laptop so all of our devices can be connected.
    Problem started happening when she had to plug the cable on her laptop one day as I was away for uni and we simply cannot take the damn cable out of it. I'm working on getting a replacement one before I can try bruteforcing it, but I'm also worried that it might break the port.

    In any case, we've been using her laptop as the router for the last few weeks, but somehow Virtual Router Manager doesn't work here (it fails to recognize the virtual mini port), so I'm manually routing it using the netsh wlan script. The problem is that it simply stopped working last week and I have no idea why.
    The network is still being set succesfully and all devices can connect to it, but they can't connect to the internet. Doing a adapter troubleshooting, windows says it's because it doesn't have a valid IP connection. I've since looked for solutions for this online, but none of them fit my problem.

    I've tried the netsh reset log commands with to no avail. The computer connected to the wired modem has perfect connection (I'm currently writing from it), it's just the hosted wifi that doesn't work.

    Thoughts?
    Thank you so much in advance!
    Wednesday, August 24, 2016 3:28 PM

All replies

  • So, the basic problem is that you cannot physically remove the cable from her laptop. If so, turning it off would render everything to normal, not?


    Best regards, George

    Wednesday, August 24, 2016 3:37 PM
  • That is one of the two issues. If we managed to get the cable out, it would be mostly fixed because there are still times I'm out of the house with my laptop and she needs to either use the net on her own laptop or to route it to her phone, which means it could just get stuck again.

    If we fixed the 'not being able to route from her laptop', everything would be fixed.

    Wednesday, August 24, 2016 3:40 PM
  • Hi,

    For a full list of steps to try, please see the Wired and Wireless Tutorial on this page:

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/15287/windows-why-can-not-get-connected

    After reading through the thread, there appears to be some confusion regarding Wireless Networking technologies and configurations using Windows 7 and I would like to spend some time to try and clear things up with some basic troubleshooting / best practices for Wireless Network related issues.

    1. First try and power off your modem, router and desktop/laptop. Then power on the modem, then the router, and then finally the desktop/laptop. Please do this in that order, allowing 60 seconds in between each device to enable the device to be fully booted and able to accept connections.

    2. Update the drivers for your wireless network adapter via Windows Update, or by using the website for either the company you bought your PC/Laptop from or the manufacturer of your networking device.

    3. Ensure that your router is set to broadcast it’s network name (SSID), ensure that you are connecting to the correct wireless network (SSID) and that you are using the correct WEP/WPA  passkey on both devices.

    a. Please use “Windows Connect Now” or “Wi-Fi Protected Setup” if available on your wireless router to ensure that the connection is setup correctly.

    4. If you are trying to use WPA or WPA2, please ensure that both your network adapter and wireless router support this protocol. If you are having issues detecting your wireless network when using WPA or WPA2, try configuring your router to use WEP instead and see if you can connect.

    a. Please note that the change between WEP/WPA/WPA2 will need to be made on both your computer and wireless router.

    b. If you are only able to connect using WEP, then your networking hardware may need a firmware upgrade. If you are not comfortable doing this yourself, please call your hardware/router manufacturer for help in doing this.

    5. If you are having a problem with your wireless connection after resuming from hibernate or sleep, or are having intermittent connectivity issues, try to adjust your Power Management profile to change your Wireless Adapter Settings to Maximum Performance. 

    a. To do this click “Change Plan Settings” next to your Power Profile, and choose “Wireless Adapter Settings” and set it to Maximum Performance.

     

    6. Call the support line for your router manufacturer. It is likely that neither Windows nor the router are having problems, it is simply an issue of getting the configuration settings on both set up to work correctly together. The router manufacturer will be the best resource to know how to configure their device.

    Best Regards,

    Tao


    Please remember to <b>mark the replies as an answers</b> if they help and <b> unmark</b> them if they provide no help.<br/> If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact <a href="mailto:tnmff@microsoft.com"> tnmff@microsoft.com</a>.

    Thursday, August 25, 2016 9:40 AM
    Moderator
  • For a full list of steps to try, please see the Wired and Wireless Tutorial on this page:

    https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/15287/windows-why-can-not-get-connected

    I can ping the cable network on the host laptop, but I can't ping the hosted wifi network from my laptop. Both network adapters are up to date. None of the networking commands worked; specifically, ipconfig /renew gave a warning as was unable to renew the routed network.

    1. First try and power off your modem, router and desktop/laptop. Then power on the modem, then the router, and then finally the desktop/laptop. Please do this in that order, allowing 60 seconds in between each device to enable the device to be fully booted and able to accept connections.

    That didn't work.

    2. Update the drivers for your wireless network adapter via Windows Update, or by using the website for either the company you bought your PC/Laptop from or the manufacturer of your networking device.

    They're all up to date.

    3. Ensure that your router is set to broadcast it’s network name (SSID), ensure that you are connecting to the correct wireless network (SSID) and that you are using the correct WEP/WPA passkey on both devices.

    Yep, it's broadcasting and I'm connecting to the correct network.

    a. Please use “Windows Connect Now” or “Wi-Fi Protected Setup” if available on your wireless router to ensure that the connection is setup correctly.

    It is not a router so I don't have this option.

    5. If you are having a problem with your wireless connection after resuming from hibernate or sleep, or are having intermittent connectivity issues, try to adjust your Power Management profile to change your Wireless Adapter Settings to Maximum Performance. 

    That's not the issue.

    6. Call the support line for your router manufacturer. It is likely that neither Windows nor the router are having problems, it is simply an issue of getting the configuration settings on both set up to work correctly together. The router manufacturer will be the best resource to know how to configure their device.

    I DON'T have a router. I'm using a laptop as a router. It was previously working fine and suddenly stopped.

    Thursday, August 25, 2016 12:26 PM
  • Hi,

    We haven’t heard from you for a couple of days, have you solved the problem? We are looking forward to your good news.

    Best Regards,

    Tao


    Please remember to <b>mark the replies as an answers</b> if they help and <b> unmark</b> them if they provide no help.<br/> If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact <a href="mailto:tnmff@microsoft.com"> tnmff@microsoft.com</a>.

    Tuesday, August 30, 2016 8:27 AM
    Moderator