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Missing DLLs RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

     

    recently, I had a virus on my computer so, in order to combat it, I did an in-depth boot time scan with my anti-virus.  It detected several threats and deleted them, however, when I turned on my computer next, two error messages came up saying that two .dll files were missing.  The two .dll files that came up in the error message are:

    unuluqot.dll
    KBApspad.dll

    Basically, my question is, are these .dll files important, what do they do, and is there any way that I can get them again (preferably without re-installing windows 7)?

    Thanks in advance.

    Saturday, February 26, 2011 12:58 PM

Answers

  • It sounds as though your ‘anti’ program has removed the malware files, or some of them, but missed the entry in the registry, possibly due to an out-dated definitions database. I suggest you, firstly, download and run the free Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware from http://www.malwarebytes.org/ to ensure that you are completely clean. If you then restart the computer and the message is still appearing try one of these, but it is prudent to create a system restore point before you change the registry in (1) below:
     
    1. The entry is probably in one of the \Run keys, but as the rascals could be hiding in a number of other keys, it’s quicker to search the whole registry. Open a Run window (Windows Logo key+R), type regedit and press Enter. Click Edit > Find and type the rogue’s name, put ticks in Keys, Values and Data, then click Find Next. When it’s found in the right pane, right-click it and delete it. There should be only one entry but press F3 to continue searching, just to confirm there are no more.

    2. If you’re concerned about making registry changes disable the entry using the system configuration utility, but bear in mind that you’re disabling the entry not deleting it as you would in (1) above. Click the Windows Orb (Start), type msconfig and press Enter. Go to the Startup Tab and remove the tick alongside the rogue’s name. Click Apply, OK, etc. and restart the computer. When it restarts, put a tick in ‘Don‘t show this again‘ as you‘re effectively doing a selective start up.

    • Edited by BurrWalnut Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:47 PM Spelling mistake
    • Proposed as answer by Andre.Ziegler Saturday, February 26, 2011 3:04 PM
    • Marked as answer by Leo Huang Friday, March 4, 2011 9:40 AM
    Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:24 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    I don't know what the .dll files do but if they are important windows files.

    Run this to fix .dll missing files.

    Start - all programs - accessories - command prompt right click and run as administrator .

    type the following in command prompt window  sfc  /scannow   hit enter key to run.


    Please bear in mind, that my answer is based on the details given in your post. The more I get the better the answer, Slan go foill, Paul
    Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:10 PM
  • It sounds as though your ‘anti’ program has removed the malware files, or some of them, but missed the entry in the registry, possibly due to an out-dated definitions database. I suggest you, firstly, download and run the free Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware from http://www.malwarebytes.org/ to ensure that you are completely clean. If you then restart the computer and the message is still appearing try one of these, but it is prudent to create a system restore point before you change the registry in (1) below:
     
    1. The entry is probably in one of the \Run keys, but as the rascals could be hiding in a number of other keys, it’s quicker to search the whole registry. Open a Run window (Windows Logo key+R), type regedit and press Enter. Click Edit > Find and type the rogue’s name, put ticks in Keys, Values and Data, then click Find Next. When it’s found in the right pane, right-click it and delete it. There should be only one entry but press F3 to continue searching, just to confirm there are no more.

    2. If you’re concerned about making registry changes disable the entry using the system configuration utility, but bear in mind that you’re disabling the entry not deleting it as you would in (1) above. Click the Windows Orb (Start), type msconfig and press Enter. Go to the Startup Tab and remove the tick alongside the rogue’s name. Click Apply, OK, etc. and restart the computer. When it restarts, put a tick in ‘Don‘t show this again‘ as you‘re effectively doing a selective start up.

    • Edited by BurrWalnut Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:47 PM Spelling mistake
    • Proposed as answer by Andre.Ziegler Saturday, February 26, 2011 3:04 PM
    • Marked as answer by Leo Huang Friday, March 4, 2011 9:40 AM
    Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:24 PM
  • On Sat, 26 Feb 2011 12:58:09 +0000, Kazikli Bey wrote:

    recently, I had a virus on my computer so, in order to combat it, I did an in-depth boot time scan with my anti-virus.  It detected several threats and deleted them, however, when I turned on my computer next, two error messages came up saying that two .dll files were missing.  The two .dll files that came up in the error message are:

    unuluqot.dll
    KBApspad.dll

    Basically, my question is, are these .dll files important, what do they do, and is there any way that I can get them again (preferably without re-installing windows 7)?

    You don't want them again.
    A web search on either of those names turns up nothing. That almost
    certainly means that they are malware (viruses or other types of
    malware). They are random names generated by the malware; the names
    are random so that you can't get any info about them with a web
    search.

    What has happened is that your anti-virus removed the malware, but
    left a call to them among your auto-starting programs. Just remove the
    calls with MSConfig and all should be well.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Saturday, February 26, 2011 2:38 PM
  • You don't want them again.
    A web search on either of those names turns up nothing. That almost
    certainly means that they are malware (viruses or other types of
    malware). They are random names generated by the malware; the names
    are random so that you can't get any info about them with a web
    search.

    What has happened is that your anti-virus removed the malware, but
    left a call to them among your auto-starting programs. Just remove the
    calls with MSConfig and all should be well.


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP

    Forgive my non-tech savvy ways, but how do I go about doing this?

    And also, thank you, I thought something might be up when I did a search and it yielded nothing, even the .dll site that I go to found nothing, so it's good to know that if a search yields no fruit, it was probably a rotten apple anyway.

    Sunday, February 27, 2011 1:33 PM
  • Do what BurrWalnut told you.

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Sunday, February 27, 2011 3:48 PM
  • Do what BurrWalnut told you.

    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code" CLIP- Stellvertreter http://www.winvistaside.de/
    Ah, silly me.  Thank you all for your help!
    Monday, February 28, 2011 12:38 AM