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DPM 2016 - storage design RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    there are lot of articles about modern storage used in DPM2016. But all say that DPM2016 as virtual machine is best practice. Because when I would like to use deduplication directly on ReFS I can´t, so workaround is to attach VHDX files to DPM virtual machine and then enable deduplication on hardware level.

    OK, can be in some cases as solution. But what about this design:

    Server 2016 + DPM2016 on baremetal. One physical disk for OS and database (ca 150GB) + One physical storage for DPM (ca 11TB). From server level we will create about 8 x 1TB VHDX files on NTFS volume and enable deduplication. Those VHDX added to storage pool on same server and create a volume with ReFS and this volume added to DPM.

    Do you see any problem with this access? Any possible issues?

    Reason for this:

    a. limit consumed memory resources (hyper-V has some memory requirements)

    b. two machines which must be updated

    c. and generally more complicated setup in case of VM

    From my point of view is not DPM2016 good step. Historicaly it was easy-to-use instant tool for rapid backups of Microsoft environments. Today it seems to be complicated piece of software with lots of bugs and unwanted features. As example I can name : Unsupported VMWare environments in 2016, problems with BMR backups (too much storage consumed) and constant dependency on AD (thats from history). Still not supporting distributed model (so some kind of media agents without DPM and SQL app installed in remote location). What we all expect is 100% reliable backup.

    Thursday, January 18, 2018 9:39 AM

Answers

  • Hello Michal

    In theory this would be possible. You could create multiple virtual disk on your physical storage and attach those virtual disk to your physical DPM server, create storage pool+vdisk+refs volume. But the first problem is that VHD disks aren't mounted automatically after server reboot. If you manage to create a script to mount your VHD disks on startup correctly, you will probably have performance problems (quite sure). The other thing is that this approach isn't supported for DPM, the only supported way is like you already mention, deploy DPM as a VM, which is the right way to go, if you would like to take advantage of deduplication. If you do not need deduplication you can still deploy a physical DPM server.

    I would recommend that you deploy a Hyper-V Server Core Edition which will consume less memory resources and less updates as the full GUI version, deploy DPM as a VM and enable deduplication on your Hyper-V Host. 

    There are some great articles about deduplication with DPM 2016. One of them is this one


    MCSE, MCSA, MS, MCP, MCTS, System Engineer


    Thursday, January 18, 2018 10:49 AM

All replies

  • Hello Michal

    In theory this would be possible. You could create multiple virtual disk on your physical storage and attach those virtual disk to your physical DPM server, create storage pool+vdisk+refs volume. But the first problem is that VHD disks aren't mounted automatically after server reboot. If you manage to create a script to mount your VHD disks on startup correctly, you will probably have performance problems (quite sure). The other thing is that this approach isn't supported for DPM, the only supported way is like you already mention, deploy DPM as a VM, which is the right way to go, if you would like to take advantage of deduplication. If you do not need deduplication you can still deploy a physical DPM server.

    I would recommend that you deploy a Hyper-V Server Core Edition which will consume less memory resources and less updates as the full GUI version, deploy DPM as a VM and enable deduplication on your Hyper-V Host. 

    There are some great articles about deduplication with DPM 2016. One of them is this one


    MCSE, MCSA, MS, MCP, MCTS, System Engineer


    Thursday, January 18, 2018 10:49 AM
  • díky za vyjasnění.

    Thank you for clarification. OK, I will move to recommended scenario.

    Thursday, January 18, 2018 9:34 PM