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Ethernet Adapter with 64 Bit Signed Driver RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am having a heck of a time.  I have installed Windows Vista Home Premium 64 Bit and the ASUS P5QC mobo I have came with an unsigned 64 bit Atheros AR8121/AR8113/AR8114 PCI-E Ethernet Controller
    driver.

    I called ASUS tech support and talked to them and as of this time, they have only a beta version of the 64 bit signed driver.  Vista is not accepting the driver and is considering it as unsigned, so I am left without a computer that can connect to the net.

    I have searched hi and low all over the internet to see if I could buy a wired ethernet adapter which has a 64 bit signed driver, but all of the ethernet cards I have been able to find are only compatible with the 32 bit version of Vista or they only have unsigned drivers for their ethernet cards.  This is really frustrating!

    Does anyone know here WHO (what manufacturer, make, model) of a wired ethernet adapter card 10/100 or 10/1000/1000 (that does not cost a fortune - is retail version, not industrial or commercial)
    I might be able to purchase that has the appropriate signed drivers - or

    Does anyone here know HOW to disable the signed driver enforcement in Vista Home Premium 64 Bit with SP1?  I understand it was possible to do it at one time, but since Microsoft HEXED us with two patches, that route has been disabled.  I am not a computer guru, just a typical computer affeciando
    with enough knowledge in building computers to put them together.  So if there is a way to disable the mandatory signed driver requirement, I would like a step by step explanation of how to do it, in lieu
    of the need to purchase a new card (my ASIS mobo comes with an UNSIGNED version of the 64 bit driver - so I would like to use this if possible.  I am the sole owner of my computer, and I really do NOT care if it is signed or not and since it is my computer, I should be able to do as I please with it).

    So any help would be greatfully appreciated

    1 - Do you know who makes wired ethernet cards with 64 bit signed drivers compatible with Vista?

    2 - In lieu of this, how do I disable the mandatory signed driver requirement in Vista 64 bit?

    Thanks
    Wednesday, January 21, 2009 9:33 PM

Answers

  •  

    Hi,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    After researching, I found a driver for Atheros AR81Family Ethernet Controller in Atheros’ site:

     

    Atheros Driver Downloads

     

    Please try “Atheros AR81Family Windows Driver x86/x64(Vista, XP, Server 2003)” to see if it works.

     

    As the Ethernet Controller chipset is manufactured by Atheros, it is also recommended that you contact Atheros for technical support.

     

    Note: Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

     

    Hope this issue can be resolved soon.

     

    Thanks.


    Nicholas Li - MSFT
    Friday, January 23, 2009 8:52 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  •  

    Hi,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    After researching, I found a driver for Atheros AR81Family Ethernet Controller in Atheros’ site:

     

    Atheros Driver Downloads

     

    Please try “Atheros AR81Family Windows Driver x86/x64(Vista, XP, Server 2003)” to see if it works.

     

    As the Ethernet Controller chipset is manufactured by Atheros, it is also recommended that you contact Atheros for technical support.

     

    Note: Microsoft provides third-party contact information to help you find technical support. This contact information may change without notice. Microsoft does not guarantee the accuracy of this third-party contact information.

     

    Hope this issue can be resolved soon.

     

    Thanks.


    Nicholas Li - MSFT
    Friday, January 23, 2009 8:52 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks Nick - The fact is, I discovered these drivers, the exact ones you pointed out, and I called Atheros.  The lady who answered was very snotty and pointed and told me that Atheros only licenses a generalized driver to vendors (like ASUS, for example).  So, in other words, these drivers were not designed to be downloaded by individuals like myself - not like nVidia generalized drivers.  As a last resort, I would do this anyway, but the offensiveness of the individual I talked to happen to turn me off.  Anyway, I think I now have a stable Vista 64 bit platform with the driver that cames from ASUS, but I am not going to reveal HOW I did that (it is not a signed driver, but it installed anyway) because I don't want Microsoft screwing with it and creating a patch that will void the "fix" that I discovered...like Microsoft did when they disabled the ability to disable signed drivers with two KB patches. 

    I understand the nature of the reasoning of why Microsoft wants to limit things to signed, certified drivers - but what Microsoft is forgetting, is that, this is MY machine - not theirs.  And if I wish to use unsigned drivers, that should be my privilege.  Now, if Microsoft wants to enforce the signed driver policy on BUSINSESES where everything on a computer is mission-critical, that is ok with me.  But as a private individual, I don't think Microsoft should be in the business of enforcing their personal ethics about security and stability on the public.  If a driver that is unsigned, works - and does not create system-wide problems or crashes, then what is the point?  That is what I am saying. 

    Microsoft put me (and a lot of other people) through a real hassle with the 64 bit platform because of this nonsense...and all they have achieved is a lot of ill will towards Microsoft and a resentment against Vista 64 bit.

    I happen to be a troubleshooter on several internet computer sites and assist people in building their own computers, and many are going to quad core with > 4 gig RAM and they want to use 64 bit - but the lack of drivers, the lack of software, is preventing the development of general public 64 bit platform use.  One thing Microsoft can do, is to stop creating barriers to progress if they expect people to adopt current or future operating system platforms.

    Thanks for your help and I do appreciate the assistance.

    Friday, January 30, 2009 6:26 PM