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How to image SBS 2011 from a 120gb ssd to a 240gb ssd? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a server running SBS 2011. The os is on a 120gb ssd and is running out of space so I would like to swap that drive out for a 240 gb ssd. I am storing the data on a raid 5 setup so I don't need the os drive to be any bigger than the 240gb. Does SBS have a utility to image over to another drive?

    Thanks

    Monday, November 9, 2015 10:38 PM

Answers

  • 120GB should be big enough.  Have you cleaned up excess data off the c: drive - there have been issues with IIS log files, WSUS, and other things taking up space (use Treesize to get an overview of where the space is going).  Best bet is to add the new drive and then move some of the data off the c: drive (like the pagefile, log files, WSUS data) to it.

    If you want to replace it you'll need a third party imaging program and then boot off the new drive.  Once its working you should be able to expand it like this:

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/mghazai/archive/2009/02/24/extend-system-boot-volume-on-windows-server-2008-windows-vista-win7-beta.aspx


    -- Al

    Thursday, November 12, 2015 5:21 PM
  • Adding to this the question about "a drive" of whatever size.  SSD drives are admittedly less likely to fail than rotating magnetic media but the do fail and without warning.  Everything you can identify (making no comment about things that we can't identify) is somewhere on a bell curve in its life cycle.  We just don't know which ones are in the bottom 25 percent and which ones are in the top 25 percent.

    Agreeing that 120 GB should be enough for a SYSTEM partition with no user data and no swap file.  In these days of 24/32 GB RAM the swap files get pretty large.  For TreeSize or Windirstat you must right click and "run as administrator" to get a true picture of what is taking up the space.

    So any of the suggestions will work.  So would adding a mirror, letting the drives mirror, breaking the mirror, and then expanding the partition on the larger drive.  But SBS backup and restore is the least complicated of all of these and gives you a chance to test your backup strategy.

    Let us know how it turns out.


    Larry Struckmeyer [MVP]-- --If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Thursday, November 12, 2015 8:44 PM
  • Not at all.  Suggesting that ONE drive of any type is a failure waiting to happen.  RAID1 will (usually) protect against a single point of failure of the things that are likely to fail.  Not that the MOBO or the Storage Controller cannot fail, but when they do the data is usually intact.

    Having said that, if your org can stand the time to procure and install a new hard drive and restore from backup, then one drive may be worth the lower cost of two drive.  Most companies prefer to NOT suffer the down time caused by the loss of one drive where it is the only drive.


    Larry Struckmeyer [MVP]-- --If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Friday, November 13, 2015 2:51 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    According to your description, my understanding is that you want to replace current SSD(SBS OS installed) with a larger one.

    You may consider of SBS built-in function - Bare Metal Restore. Detail steps you may reference below blog(also applied to SBS 2011):
    How to Perform a Bare Metal Restore on Small Business Server 2008
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/sbs/archive/2010/06/11/how-to-perform-a-bare-metal-restore-on-small-business-server-2008.aspx

    Doing a test before any change in your production environment.

    Best Regards,
    Eve Wang

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, November 10, 2015 6:32 AM
  • 120GB should be big enough.  Have you cleaned up excess data off the c: drive - there have been issues with IIS log files, WSUS, and other things taking up space (use Treesize to get an overview of where the space is going).  Best bet is to add the new drive and then move some of the data off the c: drive (like the pagefile, log files, WSUS data) to it.

    If you want to replace it you'll need a third party imaging program and then boot off the new drive.  Once its working you should be able to expand it like this:

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/mghazai/archive/2009/02/24/extend-system-boot-volume-on-windows-server-2008-windows-vista-win7-beta.aspx


    -- Al

    Thursday, November 12, 2015 5:21 PM
  • Adding to this the question about "a drive" of whatever size.  SSD drives are admittedly less likely to fail than rotating magnetic media but the do fail and without warning.  Everything you can identify (making no comment about things that we can't identify) is somewhere on a bell curve in its life cycle.  We just don't know which ones are in the bottom 25 percent and which ones are in the top 25 percent.

    Agreeing that 120 GB should be enough for a SYSTEM partition with no user data and no swap file.  In these days of 24/32 GB RAM the swap files get pretty large.  For TreeSize or Windirstat you must right click and "run as administrator" to get a true picture of what is taking up the space.

    So any of the suggestions will work.  So would adding a mirror, letting the drives mirror, breaking the mirror, and then expanding the partition on the larger drive.  But SBS backup and restore is the least complicated of all of these and gives you a chance to test your backup strategy.

    Let us know how it turns out.


    Larry Struckmeyer [MVP]-- --If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Thursday, November 12, 2015 8:44 PM
  • Are you suggesting that an SSD is not the best way to go for the OS?
    Thursday, November 12, 2015 8:59 PM
  • Not at all.  Suggesting that ONE drive of any type is a failure waiting to happen.  RAID1 will (usually) protect against a single point of failure of the things that are likely to fail.  Not that the MOBO or the Storage Controller cannot fail, but when they do the data is usually intact.

    Having said that, if your org can stand the time to procure and install a new hard drive and restore from backup, then one drive may be worth the lower cost of two drive.  Most companies prefer to NOT suffer the down time caused by the loss of one drive where it is the only drive.


    Larry Struckmeyer [MVP]-- --If your question is answered please mark the response as the answer so that others can benefit.

    Friday, November 13, 2015 2:51 AM