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Recovering entire server RRS feed

  • Question

  • I'm completely stunned at how difficult it has been to try and recover my server from a DPM backup. I cannot find a single article anywhere which describes the process. Here is my scenario...

    Information about my backup

    DPM 2012
    Backup of my W2k8 R2 server TARGETSERVER
    TARGETSERVER is running Operations Manager 2012
    Recovery points available for C: drive, D: drive, and L: drive
    Recovery points available for SystemState
    Recoverypoints available for TARGETSERVER\SQLEXPRESS

    The scenario

    My original TARGETSERVER will not boot. the VHD has become corrupted and cannot be repaired.
    I have spun up a new server with the same OS
    I would like to recovery my entire server and get it fully operational again by restoring it onto this new server

    The question

    What is the best way to accomplish this? I have tried running a recovery in WSB on the new server, but I dont know how to access the backups on my DPM server from WSB on the target. I have also tried initiating a recovery from DPM, but its not clear how i would recover entire volumes, applications, SQL databases, etc.

    Monday, June 8, 2015 5:10 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    For disaster recovery protection, it's best to protect the server using bare metal recovery (BMR) protection or in your case assuming you are using Hyper-V virtualization, you should perform host level backup of the entire virtual machine. 

    However, since you do not have either of those two, you can restore the SystemState backup from DPM to any other server that has a DPM agent installed, or on a local volume on the DPM Server itself and share out the directory containing the windowsimagebackup folder, then you can restore the systemstate from the network location.

    On the new server run the following from an administrative command prompt:

       wbadmin start systemstaterecovery -version -recoverytarget: \\servername\sharedfolder

    More systemstate restore help can be found here 

    Once the systemstate is restored, you can get the DPM agent installed and running on the server and then restore the other components.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, June 9, 2015 2:23 AM
    Moderator
  • how do I restore the other components? do I have to create a new disk and then restore the contents of each disk? Do I have to install Operations Manager myself and then restore the SQL backup? Or does the systemstate backup contain the Operations Manager application also?
    Tuesday, June 9, 2015 3:48 AM
  • Hi,

    yes, since you lost the whole server, you will need to remake your volumes so you can restore the backup to them.  Since the disks are new / different from the original, the volume GUID's will no longer match what DPM is expecting, so you will need to restore back to an "alternate location" and restore to the new volumes.

    SystemState typically only contains files required to get the operating system back and may or may not contain non-windows services.  It depends if the application registered it's files with the system writer.

    Once you do get the server restored, you will need use the below powershell command to re-associate the new volume guids to the DPM replica volumes so protection can continue without having to make new replicas.

    Using Migrate-Datasource
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd282969.aspx

    Migrate-Datasource is a command-line script that lets you continue protecting a data source (file, folder, volume, or share) to the same replica volume even after it has been migrated to a different volume on the same protected computer. You have to run the Migrate-Datasource script even if you have not changed the drive letters of the volume because DPM recognizes volumes by the GUID and not the drive letter.

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, June 9, 2015 5:09 PM
    Moderator
  • This server was a System Center Operations Manager server. Will I be able to fully recovery this system with the backups that I have? It's no use to me to recovery Windows and the disk contents if I lost my Operations Manager application. Maybe I should be asking on the SCOM forums?
    Tuesday, June 9, 2015 7:52 PM
  • Hi,

    If SCOM is like DPM, it's brains are in the SQLDB and as long as you have a backup of that you can rebuild SCOM and restore the database.  However, you are correct, you should review SCOM disaster recovery TechNet article here  or open a post in the SCOM forum for specific questions.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, June 9, 2015 9:55 PM
    Moderator