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DPM 2007 to DPM 2010 Upgrade RRS feed

  • Question

  • We currently have 5 Windows 2008 x64 servers with DPM 2007 SP1 on them.  We are wanting to upgrade to DPM 2010 but we were under the impression that upgrading them would not be the best thing to do.  I believe we were told (not sure by who), that we should build a new DPM 2010 server and then we could migrate a DPM 2007 server to it.  We were told that this would fix some of the Replica and Recovery Point hard disk issues.  (issues being from when we have had to add space many times to each replica or recovery point).  I have looked at the Upgrade Advisor, but I don't believe I see the steps that I am looking for.  Any advice would be appreciated.  I already have a new 2010 DPM server setup and ready.  Thanks in advance.

    • Moved by Praveen D [MSFT] Wednesday, August 11, 2010 2:16 PM Moving to DPM Setup Forum (From:Data Protection Manager)
    Tuesday, August 10, 2010 6:35 PM

Answers

  •  OK here we go - if you want to upgrade from Windows 2008 X64 DPM 2007 to DPM 2010 on a NEW machine - while maintaining the original Storage, then migrate to new storage, you can do the following:

    1) Upgrade the original Windows 2008 X64 DPM 2007 server to DPM 2010 RTM.


    2) Open a command prompt and run C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin\DpmBackup.exe –db.

    This will create a DPMDB.bak backup and place it in C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Volumes\ShadowCopy\Database Backups folder.  (should be a file called dpmdb.bak with todays date)

    3) Copy the DPM 2010 DPMDB.bak file to a network share on a different machine.

    4) Shutdown the old DPM server.

    5) Install Windows 2008 x64 on the new machine, or if already installed, rename the machine to the "original" DPM server name and join the same domain as the original DPM server. This is a must.

    6) Install DPM 2010 and make sure the NEW san disks are visible in disk management as RAW (unallocated) disks.

    7) Attach the old dpm storage pool disks to the new DPM server and import the foreign disks in disk management.

    8) Copy the DPM 2010 dpmdb.bak file from the network share to the new DPM 2010 server local drive (IE: C:\dpmbackup\dpmdb.bak).

    9) Open a command prompt and change to C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin.
        Run DpmSync –restoredb –dbloc <DPMDB location>, and then press ENTER.  See example below.

          DpmSync –restoredb –dbloc  “C:\dpmbackup\dpmdb.bak”

    10) Once the above command completes run C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin\DpmSync –sync.

    11) After that completes, open the DPM console and run consistency checks for all the data sources.

    12) After consistency checks are completed, ADD the new RAW SAN disks to the DPM storage pool.

    13) Now you can use the MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 and migrate data from the OLD SAN disk(s) to the NEW SAN disk(s).


    Run these DPM power-shell commands:

     $disk= get-dpmdisk dpm_server_name
     $disk

    PS C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin> $disk = get-dpmdisk My-DPM-Server
    PS C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin> $disk

    Name                  Status                             NtDiskId        Total Capacity    Unallocated Space Type
    ----                  ------                             --------        --------------    ----------------- ----
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   1                233 GB                13 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   2                233 GB               153 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   3                233 GB                95 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   4                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   5                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   6                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic

     

    The output of the $disk variable list is indexed as an array, so the 1st disk listed is element [0] and the second disk is element [1], etc.. so don't use the ntdiskID number, that will results in a mess !!.

    Say you have 6 disks ($disk-0..5]) where the $disk[0..2] is old SAN Disks and $disk[3..5] is new SAN disks.


    You can now migrate using $olddisk as source and $newdisk as target (as arrays rather than disk by disk).


    MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName <dpmservername> –Source $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[1],$disk[2]) –Destination $newdisk=@($disk[3],disk[4],disk[5])


    If the new and old disks mixed & matched and are out of order you can do the following:

    $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[2],$disk[4])
    $newdisk=@($disk[1],disk[3],disk[5])


    When Migrating disk to disk mode, The only concern is that new SAN needs to have sufficient total unallocated space to hold all the source disks replica and recovery point volumes.


    I do recommend to use 1 or 2 steps more rather than trying to funnel all in 1 command line although more than perfectly possible with Powershell.

    For instance do this first:

    $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[1],$disk[2])
    $olddisk

    $newdisk=@($disk[3],$disk[4],$disk[5])
    $olddisk

    Check that the outputs contain expected values and if so, you can pass $olddisk and $newdisk as single arguments rather than an expression leading to same.

    MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName <dpmservername> –Source $olddisk –Destination $newdisk

    14)  As the old recovery points expire on the old SAN disks, the volumes will automatically be deleted by DPM.
         Once all the OLD San disks show 100% unallocated, you can remove them from the system.

    Good luck.


    Regards, Mike J [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 5:56 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    The only way to perform an upgrade is from a running DPM 2007 server.  There is no "migrate" option available, so you wil need to perform upgrades as per the advisor if you want to maintain your configuration / RP's.

    If you have lots of volumes that have been extended over time and you want to clean those up, you can add a new disk to the server, but don't add it to the DPM storage pool, then use the MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 and migrate the data source to "custom volumes".  Once the old RP's get expired, the fragmented volumes will be deleted from the storage pool disks.  Do that for all the highly fragmented volumes, and then you can migrate the datasources back to the dpm storage pool disks.


    Regards, Mike J [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Tuesday, August 10, 2010 7:29 PM
    Moderator
  • I think I understand.  I need to upgrade the current DPM 2007 server to DPM 2010.  Then I can migrate data to new volumes to try and clean up the volumes.  But what if after I upgrade to DPM 2010, I want to move it to a new Server and new Storage.  How could I do that?

    Thanks again in advance.

    Tuesday, August 10, 2010 8:00 PM
  • Hi,

    It depends if you want to maintain the old storage on the new DPM server or just start with new storage and not worry out the old storage. 

     

    If the latter, then you just build a new DPM 2010 server using the same name, then import the old DPM server DPMDB using dpmsync commands.  Once you import the DB, you can add new storage to the storage pool and run dpmsync -reallocatereplica to remake the replica and recovery point volumes on the new disks, then run CC to get back into protection.

     

    See Using DPMSync: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff634215.aspx


    Regards, Mike J [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Tuesday, August 10, 2010 9:36 PM
    Moderator
  • What if I want to maintain the old storage?  We don't have tape backups.  We run DPM from offsite locations.  So, starting the data over would take too long.

    Thanks for all of your responses.

    Mike

    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 3:11 PM
  •  OK here we go - if you want to upgrade from Windows 2008 X64 DPM 2007 to DPM 2010 on a NEW machine - while maintaining the original Storage, then migrate to new storage, you can do the following:

    1) Upgrade the original Windows 2008 X64 DPM 2007 server to DPM 2010 RTM.


    2) Open a command prompt and run C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin\DpmBackup.exe –db.

    This will create a DPMDB.bak backup and place it in C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\Volumes\ShadowCopy\Database Backups folder.  (should be a file called dpmdb.bak with todays date)

    3) Copy the DPM 2010 DPMDB.bak file to a network share on a different machine.

    4) Shutdown the old DPM server.

    5) Install Windows 2008 x64 on the new machine, or if already installed, rename the machine to the "original" DPM server name and join the same domain as the original DPM server. This is a must.

    6) Install DPM 2010 and make sure the NEW san disks are visible in disk management as RAW (unallocated) disks.

    7) Attach the old dpm storage pool disks to the new DPM server and import the foreign disks in disk management.

    8) Copy the DPM 2010 dpmdb.bak file from the network share to the new DPM 2010 server local drive (IE: C:\dpmbackup\dpmdb.bak).

    9) Open a command prompt and change to C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin.
        Run DpmSync –restoredb –dbloc <DPMDB location>, and then press ENTER.  See example below.

          DpmSync –restoredb –dbloc  “C:\dpmbackup\dpmdb.bak”

    10) Once the above command completes run C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin\DpmSync –sync.

    11) After that completes, open the DPM console and run consistency checks for all the data sources.

    12) After consistency checks are completed, ADD the new RAW SAN disks to the DPM storage pool.

    13) Now you can use the MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 and migrate data from the OLD SAN disk(s) to the NEW SAN disk(s).


    Run these DPM power-shell commands:

     $disk= get-dpmdisk dpm_server_name
     $disk

    PS C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin> $disk = get-dpmdisk My-DPM-Server
    PS C:\Program Files\Microsoft DPM\DPM\bin> $disk

    Name                  Status                             NtDiskId        Total Capacity    Unallocated Space Type
    ----                  ------                             --------        --------------    ----------------- ----
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   1                233 GB                13 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   2                233 GB               153 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   3                233 GB                95 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   4                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   5                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic
    WDC WD2500JS-75NCB... Healthy                                   6                233 GB               233 GB Dynamic

     

    The output of the $disk variable list is indexed as an array, so the 1st disk listed is element [0] and the second disk is element [1], etc.. so don't use the ntdiskID number, that will results in a mess !!.

    Say you have 6 disks ($disk-0..5]) where the $disk[0..2] is old SAN Disks and $disk[3..5] is new SAN disks.


    You can now migrate using $olddisk as source and $newdisk as target (as arrays rather than disk by disk).


    MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName <dpmservername> –Source $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[1],$disk[2]) –Destination $newdisk=@($disk[3],disk[4],disk[5])


    If the new and old disks mixed & matched and are out of order you can do the following:

    $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[2],$disk[4])
    $newdisk=@($disk[1],disk[3],disk[5])


    When Migrating disk to disk mode, The only concern is that new SAN needs to have sufficient total unallocated space to hold all the source disks replica and recovery point volumes.


    I do recommend to use 1 or 2 steps more rather than trying to funnel all in 1 command line although more than perfectly possible with Powershell.

    For instance do this first:

    $olddisk=@($disk[0],$disk[1],$disk[2])
    $olddisk

    $newdisk=@($disk[3],$disk[4],$disk[5])
    $olddisk

    Check that the outputs contain expected values and if so, you can pass $olddisk and $newdisk as single arguments rather than an expression leading to same.

    MigrateDatasourceDataFromDPM.ps1 –DPMServerName <dpmservername> –Source $olddisk –Destination $newdisk

    14)  As the old recovery points expire on the old SAN disks, the volumes will automatically be deleted by DPM.
         Once all the OLD San disks show 100% unallocated, you can remove them from the system.

    Good luck.


    Regards, Mike J [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.
    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 5:56 PM
    Moderator
  • WOW...   That is awesome.  Thank you very much.
    Wednesday, August 11, 2010 8:21 PM