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Installing Windows SteadyState/Slowed down startup RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have downloaded and installed Windows Steady state successfully.

    I have not done any settings to the tool.

    Since then, My computer has slowd down in starting up.

    My Computer is Intel Pentium 4 CPU 2.40GHz 1.00 GB of RAM.

    How can this issue overcome

    Thursday, June 28, 2007 2:41 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    Is this a slow startup  or slow logon issue?

     

    If it is a slow logon issue, you can do so:

     

    1.Refer to this thread for an known issue after the installation of steadystate:Enormous

     

    Bootslowdown because of SCTSvc.exe (link)

     

    2. Clean boot to the system to avoid unkown factors caused by third-party softwares. For

     

    how to enable a clean boot, please refer to:

    How to configure Windows XP to start in a "clean boot" state

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310353/en-us

     

    3.If problem is still there after a clean boot, please enable userenv debug logon to monitor the logon process.

     

      add (if the registry key does not exist) or to modify the following registry entry:

     

        Subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

        Entry: UserEnvDebugLevel

        Type: REG_DWORD

        Value data: 10002 (Hexadecimal)

     

    For more information about to how to enable User Environment Debug Logging, see: http://support.microsoft.com/?id=221833>

     

    If possible, zip the files under  %Systemroot%\Debug\UserMode\Userenv.log and send it to me for further analysis, my emai: v-samyu@online.microsoft.com (No online).

     

    4. Also you can run a setup MPS report after reproduing the issue and send me the reports, the setup version MPS tool can be downloaded from:

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=CEBF3C7C-7CA5-408F-88B7-F9C79B7306C0&displaylang=en

     

    The log is written to a cab file under: %systemroot%\MPSReports\Setup\Reports\cab

     

    ------------

     

    If it is a slow startup issue, please let me know which step did the startup process stop at?

     

    Also you can perform a clean boot to see if the problem persists.

    ------------

    Sincerely,

    Sammy Yu

     

    Friday, June 29, 2007 9:06 AM
  • I am glad that the information is helpful. Hope everything goes well when students come back. J

    Friday, July 6, 2007 10:43 AM

All replies

  • I'm running into the same problem logging in as an admin. I checked the System event viewer and there's a message in there stating that it hung on startup. If anyone has a solution to this, please post. Thanks
    Thursday, June 28, 2007 5:41 PM
  • Seems to be a common issue.

     

    I've encountered the same problem. My next step is to reload the PC clean and install WSS to see if the same problem occurs.

     

    Thanks,

    Dan

     

    Thursday, June 28, 2007 5:49 PM
  • Hi,

     

    Is this a slow startup  or slow logon issue?

     

    If it is a slow logon issue, you can do so:

     

    1.Refer to this thread for an known issue after the installation of steadystate:Enormous

     

    Bootslowdown because of SCTSvc.exe (link)

     

    2. Clean boot to the system to avoid unkown factors caused by third-party softwares. For

     

    how to enable a clean boot, please refer to:

    How to configure Windows XP to start in a "clean boot" state

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310353/en-us

     

    3.If problem is still there after a clean boot, please enable userenv debug logon to monitor the logon process.

     

      add (if the registry key does not exist) or to modify the following registry entry:

     

        Subkey: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon

        Entry: UserEnvDebugLevel

        Type: REG_DWORD

        Value data: 10002 (Hexadecimal)

     

    For more information about to how to enable User Environment Debug Logging, see: http://support.microsoft.com/?id=221833>

     

    If possible, zip the files under  %Systemroot%\Debug\UserMode\Userenv.log and send it to me for further analysis, my emai: v-samyu@online.microsoft.com (No online).

     

    4. Also you can run a setup MPS report after reproduing the issue and send me the reports, the setup version MPS tool can be downloaded from:

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=CEBF3C7C-7CA5-408F-88B7-F9C79B7306C0&displaylang=en

     

    The log is written to a cab file under: %systemroot%\MPSReports\Setup\Reports\cab

     

    ------------

     

    If it is a slow startup issue, please let me know which step did the startup process stop at?

     

    Also you can perform a clean boot to see if the problem persists.

    ------------

    Sincerely,

    Sammy Yu

     

    Friday, June 29, 2007 9:06 AM
  • Hi Sammy,

     

    To answer your questions about the boot processes, the computer took longer than it normally did to get to the user login screen and when I logged in as an admin, it took about 45 seconds to a minute before the desktop would finally show. I followed the instructions provided on the Microsoft page you directed us to and it did decrease the boot time but I have a question. Won't disabling all the startup programs prevent items like anti virus from starting with the computer? I would think that would be a bit on the risky side and since I'm using these computers at a school, the students here tend to always find websites that contain spyware, etc. We do have a Wensense server in place but as I'm sure you know, it can't prevent everything. I cannot enable the disk protection since some of the software we use here requires that students save data to the hard drives so if they were to get a virus on the computer, it could very well spread throughout the entire network. Please let me know what your thoughts are on this. Call me paranoid, but I feel that this could be a bit on the dangerous side.

    Friday, June 29, 2007 3:35 PM
  • Hi,

     

    You mentioned that "Won't disabling all the startup programs prevent items like anti-virus from starting with the computer? ", yes it would. But we should enable the anti virus software after we finally isolate the root cause of the issue through clean boot and userenv log. For more information about how to use this tool to perform troubleshooting, please refer to the following Microsoft Knowledge Base article:

     

    Q310560 How to Troubleshoot By Using the Msconfig Utility in Windows XP

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/310560

     

    Also you mentioned that "I cannot enable the disk protection since some of the software we use here requires that students save data to the hard drives", does the software you use allow you to save the data to other disk partitions. If so, you can redirect students’ My Document folder or user profile to another partition and then turn on Windows Disk Protection. To do so, please see the “Redirecting the My Documents Folder” and “Creating Permanent User Profiles on a Separate Partition” sections in SteadyState Handbook.

    Tuesday, July 3, 2007 7:17 AM
  • Hi again Sammy,

     

    I could very well create a partition and lock the computers down using WDP but would not be able to allow access to the folder that would be created on the partition. If I were to grant access to the folder in question, I would run into problems with students deleting other student's work like I have in the past. I have found in my past experience with using SCT that as long as you lock the profile, it prevents most anything including any illegal software installation. Plus, I have a program that monitors the entire network for any illegal software that might have been installed. Had I thought about the partition before I started using Steady State, I might have done this. Honestly, I was glad to hear that partitions wouldn't be needed anymore since it required that I re-image all of the computers. As I stated before, I followed the instructions provided in the above post and it did succeed in increasing the boot time and shortly after, I re-enabled the AV. All is in pretty good shape as of now. Next week will be the the first true test for Steady State as the students will be returning to school after their July 4th break. If it works like the SCT did, I don't think I'll run into too many problems. Thanks for your reply.  

    Thursday, July 5, 2007 11:22 AM
  • I am glad that the information is helpful. Hope everything goes well when students come back. J

    Friday, July 6, 2007 10:43 AM
  • I have done a clean boot as described in the Microsoft website, and that action solved the problem of the slow startup after installing the Windows Steady State. But I noticed that that action disabled my Anti Virus software (despite the fact that I did not uncheck its service from the Services tab in the System Configuration Utility, so after that I have enabled the SYSTEM.INI and the WIN.INI (in the General tab of the System Configuration Utility) and I enabled all the startup items and all the services except for some services of old programs that I have installed earlier and except for the Windows Steady State Service (i.e. it is disabled now) .

     

    Now, after performing the above mentioned steps, my computer is starting up fast as it was before I install the Windows Steady State.. But I have a question: Does the stoping of the Windows Steady State service disable the Windows Steady State program from running properly?? (please note that the Windows Steady State service did not hide after I checked the Hide All Microsoft Services because an "Unknown" word was written under the Manufacturer tab)

     

    Please post if you have an answer..

     

    Sincerely,

    Sam      

     

    Sunday, August 26, 2007 12:37 AM
  • Hi Sam,

     

    The logon time issue is a known issue which is documented in the readme file of SteadyState:

     

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/7/8/C/78C3C3AA-A091-46BB-92A3-A74EBD2DC517/Readme.txt

     

    Windows SteadyState Service (SCTSvc.exe) is a critical component and should not be disabled. This service is responsible for these things:

     

    • Running software updates at the prescribed time
    • Disabling user accounts during sensitive times (during software updates, during operations that require multiple reboots like uninstalling WDP, and if it detects that WDP failed to initialize successfully), or if the system is booted in Safe Mode, and enabling them again after the trigger event has been corrected
    • Detecting which antivirus products are installed
    • Catching and reverting attempts to change the pagefile size on the system drive while WDP is installed
    • Disabling AutoLogon and restoring AutoLogon in these scenarios:
      • During software updates
      • WDP needs to reboot the machine (e.g., after changing the cache file size)
      • During intermediate reboots when WDP is being uninstalled
    • Applying and removing NTFS ACLs to restrict the user’s access to the desktop folder if the “Prevent users from saving files to the desktop” restriction is enabled
    • Enforcing the time limit specified by “Log off after xx minutes of use” on the General page of User Settings.

     

    Thus, if Windows SteadyState Service is disabled, many SteadyState features will not work properly.

     

    Best Regards,

     

    Monday, August 27, 2007 8:01 AM
  • Shawn,

    I'm having the same slow logon issue after installing the SteadyState.  However, my primary use of SteadyState is to use Disk Protection.  This is for my home laptop and no one else really uses this laptop except two people and we both normally use the same account for all our uses.  By using disk protection I'd like the laptop to go into a default state after anyone of us has used the laptop.  So all the above that you mentioned are not really relevent to my use.  So my question is: does this mean that I can disable this service without losing Disk protection functionality?  Please let me know.  Thanks.
    Friday, August 31, 2007 7:32 PM
  • Although Windows Disk Protection (WDP) still runs with the SteadyState Service disabled. It is not recommended to disable SCTSvc.exe. The following functions of SCTSvc.exe are still needed even though only WDP is required:

     

    1. Catching and reverting attempts to change the pagefile size on the system drive while WDP is installed.

    2. Install/Uninstall WDP.

    3. Running software updates at the prescribed time.

     

    As WDP without SCTSvc.exe usage scenario has not been tested, we cannot guarantee that it will work as expected. Thank you for your understanding.

     

    Regards,

     

    Monday, September 3, 2007 10:52 AM
  • I just inspected the service configuration; the service is based on the SCTSvc.exe in the program directory. I tried to stop the service and manually start the *.exe but to no avail. That's a point I don't unterstand. Would it be possible to start the service by "activating" the *.exe manually then you could copy a link in All Users\Autostart so that the *.exe gets started with a short delay but long enough to get the rest of the system in a usable state. :-)

     

    By the way, I tried the clean boot too - it worked. Alternatively you just have to deactivate the SteadyState service but that's no good solution.

     

    Are there any infos why the service takes that long to start? It is definitively the service that slows down the logon procedure!

     

    Regards,

     

    FFM_Admin

     

     

    PS: the problem we deal with is that the teachers will surely post a mass of error messages saying that the logon procedure is too slow and that we should solve it. We don't want to abandon SteadyState because it works much better than its predecessor but that is no option we can work with - and surely nobody else.

    Friday, September 21, 2007 6:55 AM
  •  

    1. Click start > run > services.msc

     

    2. Find the service "Windows SteadyState  Service" > Right Click > Properties

     

    3. Change "Startup type:" to "Manual" click on OK

     

    Reboot the computer.

     

    I actually looked in the task manager and noticed the  process image name  "SCTSvc.exe" was running and in services.msc it had started.

     

    Friday, September 21, 2007 8:31 AM
  • Then you are very lucky. Neither the process nor the service should start when set to "Manual". I just tried for myself and had no success (as expected). When a service is set to "Manual" it has to be started by a user or by activating an application that uses this service.

     

    Another question is (as mentioned before): why isn't it possible to start the service by executing SCTSvc.exe like the service that does nothing else?

    Friday, September 21, 2007 9:02 AM
  • Might be a silly question, however if you have disk protect perhaps the changes you are making are not "commiting" (permanent) therefore not working.

     

    I had this problem as well, so i decided to start with a fresh install of windows xp, and only installed steadystate. I did not turn on Disk protect (it did not create a cache file) the cache file was created after boot up speed problem was fixed. my method below is a exactly what i did, which i summarised in my above post. 

     

    Brief background.

     

    Fresh install of windows XP SP2, Installed & launched steadystate.

     

    On the main console created a user ("Add a New User"), I named it Internet with no password

     

    In the "User Settings" > "Windows Restrictions" tab I set it to "No Restrictions"

     

    In "General" Tab ("Lock profile to prevent the user from making permanet changes") was left unticked

     

    Rebooted the computer and logged in as user "Internet"

     

    At this stage the computer was running slow to boot up, even when applying the profile during login.

     

    Opened up explorer c: right clicked on windows folder and did a search for the file "services.msc"

     

    I right clicked on "services.msc" and selected "Run As" I used an administrator account.(Btw your administrator account needs to have a password otherwise it will not run)

     

    I found the service to windows SteadyState > Right Click > Properties

     

    and changed Startup type to "Manual" clicked on ok

     

    Rebooted the computer and it all worked fine booted up very quick.

     

    I actually looked in the task manager and noticed the  process image name  "SCTSvc.exe" was running and in services.msc it had started.


     

     

    Friday, September 21, 2007 1:34 PM
  • There are no silly questions... ;-)

    I did not activate WDP as well, therefore no cache file was created. The problem lies in the service; normally a service starts very fast and does not affect user interaction after logon like an autostart option.

     

    To shorten it up a bit: you logged on as "standard user", then switched the service to "manual" and it is still starting and working? :-O Makes me wonder... I will test it now for myself, let's see...

    Friday, September 21, 2007 1:42 PM
  • I'm sorry I have to disappoint you: it does not work. By the way, it makes no difference whether you switch the service to "Manual" being logged on as administrator or as user.

     

    This would work if you had the WDP switched on and then making the changes but in this case that would logically be no effort. :-)

     

    If this was a system-depending bug, I would not be that disappointed I am right now. On every system I installed this bug appeared/appears. This cannot be possible...

     

    I just installed a fresh system and installed SteadyState right after. No change.

    Friday, September 21, 2007 2:10 PM
  •  

    I am not at the computer at the moment and wont be until monday. So what i will type is from memory.

     

    In event viewer under application or system log i received an error

    The Windows SteadyState Service service hung on starting, every time i booted up the PC, if you do not get this then we are perhaps tackling different issues.

     

    Originally i thought perhaps it didnt have the correct credentials to run, so under services i checked the dependancies of steadystate and discovered remote procedure call. i checked the log on credentials and saw

    AUTHORITY\NetworkService so i set the same for steady state to that. I dont think that did anything. Because i rebooted and it was still slow.

     

    Then i thought what if Steady State is running and another process is calling it to start again? could it be because of that why it hangs? ....

     

    Mind you in my msconfig in startup i think i had a reference to bubble.exe which is an icon next to the time which says something about saving files on a removable disk.

     

    My thought is if i set the service to manual. Does bubble.exe in the msconfig start steadystate service indirectly?? i do remember seeing bubble in the task manager as well

     

    Apart from that i will check the configuration on monday. will post more information.

     

    However i am curious to know when you set the steadystate service to manual, you mention that that service does not start. Even though it does not start does the pc boot quick?

     

    if you go into services and start the steadystate service, how long does it take to start?

     

    if it starts instantly, then it could be something related to the order of which the services start.

     

    Good luck i hope you solve it.

     

    Friday, September 21, 2007 3:18 PM
  • I didn't have problems with a hanging service. It is just slow. When you deactivate the service the system logs on as fast as it should. The service itself starts as fast as the other services...

     

    The Bubble.exe has nothing to do with the service. The Bubble.exe doesn't function either (because of a specific registry configuration we use here)

     

    I have a few ideas:

    1. GPO: "Wait everytime for the network when logging on" (I don't know how it is called in english)

    --NO

     

    2. Network configuration; I will configure static information.

    --NO

     

    3. Just forgot.......

     

     

    Friday, September 21, 2007 3:35 PM
  • try this out, one has tried and told me it worked. i dunno if this will work both ways with NT and XP or with single and multiple accounts, let me know if this works with you.

    1. Run your RegEdit
    2. Locate: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Windows SteadyState
    3. Replace the value of DependOnGroup (from blank) with "C:\WINDOWS\System32\wscsvc.dll"
    4. Restart your System


    if you have multiple accounts, i think WSS will do the work for all at the same time, just make sure to TEST it first before you apply with multiple accounts and other units.
    Tuesday, July 1, 2008 12:38 PM