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Replacing HDD drive with new SSD RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, I have purchased a new laptop today with Windows 10 pre-installed.  It was on offer and my budget was tight and so I got it with HDD drive, which is much slower than SDD.  I was told by few sales assistants that I can replace the drive myself to SSD but they both explained with 2 different method.

    1. To make a full system recovery backup (I am doing write now) to USB drive. Then replace the drive and copy or boot from USB after the replacement.

    2. To put SSD into a "container" and connect it to a laptop through USB.  Then using some sort of software to "mirror" or "clone" everything from HDD to SSD, including apps etc.

    My question is what method should I use, what is the best method?

    For instance, if I use method 1, will I get all other apps that comes with Windows 10 as well? I know that my personal files would not copy, but that's fine as I haven't got any yet.

    Thank you in advance for your suggestions.

    Wednesday, October 28, 2015 4:36 PM

Answers

  • Hi Alex,

    You may have Interests reading the thread below:

    Windows 10 cloning ssd to ssd and hdd to ssd

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/11313d41-68f7-4875-b22e-022858c06900/windows-10-cloning-ssd-to-ssd-and-hdd-to-ssd?forum=win10itprohardware

    Option 1 should work, which you need to do is to boot using Windows 10 Recovery Media(your recovery USB disk), choose the repair your computer, and then select system restore, after that, system would inform you to format the disk and do the restore.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:17 AM
    • Marked as answer by Deason Wu Tuesday, November 24, 2015 2:15 AM
    Thursday, October 29, 2015 8:38 AM
  • Hi Alex,

    No. Backup and Restore should be the same thing.

    We make a system image backup to the USB drive, then restore the backup to the new drive.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/restore-computer-from-system-image-backup#1TC=windows-7

    A system image is an exact copy of a drive. By default, a system image includes the drives required for Windows to run.  It also includes Windows and your system settings, programs, and files. You can use a system image to restore the contents of your computer  if your hard disk or computer ever stops working. When you restore your computer from a system image, it's a complete restoration—you can't choose individual items to restore, and all of your current programs, system settings, and files are replaced with the contents of the system image.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:17 AM
    • Marked as answer by Deason Wu Tuesday, November 24, 2015 2:15 AM
    Thursday, November 5, 2015 3:25 AM

All replies

  • Hi Alex,

    You may have Interests reading the thread below:

    Windows 10 cloning ssd to ssd and hdd to ssd

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/11313d41-68f7-4875-b22e-022858c06900/windows-10-cloning-ssd-to-ssd-and-hdd-to-ssd?forum=win10itprohardware

    Option 1 should work, which you need to do is to boot using Windows 10 Recovery Media(your recovery USB disk), choose the repair your computer, and then select system restore, after that, system would inform you to format the disk and do the restore.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:17 AM
    • Marked as answer by Deason Wu Tuesday, November 24, 2015 2:15 AM
    Thursday, October 29, 2015 8:38 AM
  • Hi Michael,

    Thank you for your reply.  The link you've provided above uses method 2 (cloning from one to another disk).  You also said the method 1 should work.

    I am a bit confused, should I use cloning or should i fresh re-install win 10 from bootable USB?

    Can I also ask on how to make bootable USB from installed win10.  I made recovery USB using win10 built-in utility, but not sure whether that is bootable USB or is it just a recovery USB.  Are they the same thing?

    Thank you again

    Thursday, October 29, 2015 9:11 AM
  • Any disk cloning solution will go:

    Norton Ghost, Acronis TruImage, etc

    just google for hd clone


    If you find this post helpful, spend a second to vote up. Smoking~~

    Thursday, October 29, 2015 9:22 AM
  • As my disk and laptop is new and I have nothing yet stored on the drives should I not use the clean-install? Ie create Win 10 on USB, then insert new ssd drive and clean install from USB?
    Thursday, October 29, 2015 2:17 PM
  • Hi Alex,

    If you choose the backup method, yes some of the application may not work, as you just did a fresh install, I think that would be OK to go.

    For the Recovery disk, yes that is your USB disk, which contains your system image backup.

    For the clone method, if you would like to take this way, some additional pay outs should be considered, as the clone software might not be free. For the other considerations, please seek at the related software website.

    Here I would prefer the method one.

    Even the option fails, we could still restore back. :)

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, October 30, 2015 1:29 AM
  • Thank you Michael,

    Can I confirm once more to make sure I am doing the right thing.  So there are 3 methods to do this as oppsed to 2 (as I initially thought).

    1. Backup method

    2. Recovery method

    3. Clone method

    You've suggested to take method 1 (Backup method).  I was also planning this method, but wasn't sure and now will take this route.  However, I am still confused about the difference between methods 1 and 2, Backup and Recovery. 

    Is Backup method means creating Factory Backup on a USB, then clean install?

    Is Recovery means creating copy of the drive, windows and my personal files?

    If the above not right can you please explain the difference between them two.

    Thank you

    Saturday, October 31, 2015 9:28 AM
  • Can anyone please suggest when creating bootable USB media, should I use built-in Windows Creation Tool OR Rufus application?

    I would appreciate your suggestions, thank you

    Tuesday, November 3, 2015 12:01 PM
  • Hi Alex,

    No. Backup and Restore should be the same thing.

    We make a system image backup to the USB drive, then restore the backup to the new drive.

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/restore-computer-from-system-image-backup#1TC=windows-7

    A system image is an exact copy of a drive. By default, a system image includes the drives required for Windows to run.  It also includes Windows and your system settings, programs, and files. You can use a system image to restore the contents of your computer  if your hard disk or computer ever stops working. When you restore your computer from a system image, it's a complete restoration—you can't choose individual items to restore, and all of your current programs, system settings, and files are replaced with the contents of the system image.

    Regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help, and unmark the answers if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Michael_LS Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:17 AM
    • Marked as answer by Deason Wu Tuesday, November 24, 2015 2:15 AM
    Thursday, November 5, 2015 3:25 AM