none
Swapping servers on a domain RRS feed

  • Question

  • What is the proper way to swap out an old server with a new server of the same name (old server to new server) in the same domain.

    It is a bit complicated so I will try to clarify, current server name serv1, new server name serv1n, I want server1n in place of server1 and both are on the domain. I always thought that you had to remove both servers from the domain, shit down the current server, rename the new server and add it to the domain, SAM and SID issues...not interested in AD based slutions, just straight forward replacement.

    Thx

    Tuesday, April 12, 2011 10:12 PM

Answers

  • Hey Low Gee :)

    All you need is use ghostwalk.exe to walk the ssid over.. alternative is you can use shadow protect software to image the entire existing OS and clone it over using universal drivers cloning.. save your time.. in doing fresh installation :D let me know if you need any help on that :) will be great to assist you :)


    Guowen Su | CCNA, CCIP, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCTS, MCITP, CEH | http://www.microsoft.com/en/sg/default.aspx Our Goal? VERY SATISFIED Customers. If you're not...let's talk!!
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Thursday, April 14, 2011 10:59 AM
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:04 PM
  • If I understand you correctly (and please clarify if I don't), you want to replace one physical piece of hardware with another, but have the new server take on the identity of the old one.  Is that correct?  Ordinarily, I think people choose to do fresh installations on new hardware. But I assume there is some application or requirement for some service that is causing you to have to keep the original machine's identity.

    If so, a full image backup of the first server could be restored to the new hardware. 

    If the physical server you'rve moving to is already in the domain by another identity, then yes, you'll want to remove it from the domain first.  The restore of the original machine backup to the new machine will then simply make the new hardware into the original server (wiith name, SIDs, etc.)  It's important of course that, once you've tested that the new server is running correctly, that you never again boot up the original server onto the network again.  Wipe the hard disk and re-pupose or recycle that machine.

    Hope that helps,


    Kevin Remde US IT Evangelism - Microsoft Corporation http://blogs.technet.com/kevinremde
    • Proposed as answer by Soh.M Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:04 PM
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Thursday, April 14, 2011 10:59 AM
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 10:03 AM

All replies

  • If I understand you correctly (and please clarify if I don't), you want to replace one physical piece of hardware with another, but have the new server take on the identity of the old one.  Is that correct?  Ordinarily, I think people choose to do fresh installations on new hardware. But I assume there is some application or requirement for some service that is causing you to have to keep the original machine's identity.

    If so, a full image backup of the first server could be restored to the new hardware. 

    If the physical server you'rve moving to is already in the domain by another identity, then yes, you'll want to remove it from the domain first.  The restore of the original machine backup to the new machine will then simply make the new hardware into the original server (wiith name, SIDs, etc.)  It's important of course that, once you've tested that the new server is running correctly, that you never again boot up the original server onto the network again.  Wipe the hard disk and re-pupose or recycle that machine.

    Hope that helps,


    Kevin Remde US IT Evangelism - Microsoft Corporation http://blogs.technet.com/kevinremde
    • Proposed as answer by Soh.M Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:04 PM
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Thursday, April 14, 2011 10:59 AM
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 10:03 AM
  • One option if you just want apps or users to be able to reach the new server with the old name is to use a CNAME record in DNS. As soon as the old server is down you can create a CNAME record that points serv1.domain.com to serv2.domain.com.

    BTW, you should never sh** on your servers :)


    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 10:22 AM
  • Hey Low Gee :)

    All you need is use ghostwalk.exe to walk the ssid over.. alternative is you can use shadow protect software to image the entire existing OS and clone it over using universal drivers cloning.. save your time.. in doing fresh installation :D let me know if you need any help on that :) will be great to assist you :)


    Guowen Su | CCNA, CCIP, MCP, MCSA, MCSE, MCTS, MCITP, CEH | http://www.microsoft.com/en/sg/default.aspx Our Goal? VERY SATISFIED Customers. If you're not...let's talk!!
    • Marked as answer by Kevin Remde Thursday, April 14, 2011 10:59 AM
    Wednesday, April 13, 2011 1:04 PM