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From RMS to AD-RMS -- which upgrade option is better? RRS feed

  • Question

  • My current rights management services is on Server 2003 with SQL Server 2005. I plan on upgrading to AD-RMS and want to know which method is preferable. Currently the database resides on the same server as RMS so I want to separate the two into 2x Server 2012 R2 machines with one dedicated to AD-RMS and one dedicated as a SQL Server 2012 box.

    After reading the technet articles, the migration process seems to assume you want to keep the SQL database intact on what ever server it is. This is not the case for me since we are getting rid of Server 2003 machines. For what I want to do, is it as simple as exporting the three databases attached to RMS and then importing them to the new SQL box? From there I can go ahead and follow the migration policies?

    Or is that a no-no, and starting from scratch may be a better idea?

    p.s. Migrating/Upgrading to Server 2008R2 isn't out of the question. I would just prefer to skip it since 2012 is my goal.

    Wednesday, May 7, 2014 6:36 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    you want follow this article - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj835767(v=ws.10).aspx. The migration strategy is the same to 2008 R2 or 2012/2012 R2.

    Hope that helps,

    Lutz

    • Marked as answer by IAMGR00T Wednesday, May 7, 2014 11:15 PM
    Wednesday, May 7, 2014 11:14 PM
  • That article will work, but I honestly think it is overly complicated.

    You could:

    1.back up and move the databases

    2.edit the DRMS_ClusterPolicies table in the configuration database to change reference to the old db server to point to the new one.

    3.Add the ADRMS role to a 2012 server an point to that database for migration.

    4.Point your DNS CNAME record to the new server. DONE

    The advantage to this is you can test the new server between #3 and #4 by editing the hosts file of a client to point to it.  All other machines will go to the old one until you change DNS.  Once your happy you can bring it online. If something goes wrong, point it back to the old one.

    • Marked as answer by IAMGR00T Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:46 PM
    Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:40 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    you want follow this article - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj835767(v=ws.10).aspx. The migration strategy is the same to 2008 R2 or 2012/2012 R2.

    Hope that helps,

    Lutz

    • Marked as answer by IAMGR00T Wednesday, May 7, 2014 11:15 PM
    Wednesday, May 7, 2014 11:14 PM
  • Hi,

    you want follow this article - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj835767(v=ws.10).aspx. The migration strategy is the same to 2008 R2 or 2012/2012 R2.

    Hope that helps,

    Lutz

    Thank you very much. I totally skipped that.
    Wednesday, May 7, 2014 11:15 PM
  • That article will work, but I honestly think it is overly complicated.

    You could:

    1.back up and move the databases

    2.edit the DRMS_ClusterPolicies table in the configuration database to change reference to the old db server to point to the new one.

    3.Add the ADRMS role to a 2012 server an point to that database for migration.

    4.Point your DNS CNAME record to the new server. DONE

    The advantage to this is you can test the new server between #3 and #4 by editing the hosts file of a client to point to it.  All other machines will go to the old one until you change DNS.  Once your happy you can bring it online. If something goes wrong, point it back to the old one.

    • Marked as answer by IAMGR00T Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:46 PM
    Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:40 PM
  • That article will work, but I honestly think it is overly complicated.

    You could:

    1.back up and move the databases

    2.edit the DRMS_ClusterPolicies table in the configuration database to change reference to the old db server to point to the new one.

    3.Add the ADRMS role to a 2012 server an point to that database for migration.

    4.Point your DNS CNAME record to the new server. DONE

    The advantage to this is you can test the new server between #3 and #4 by editing the hosts file of a client to point to it.  All other machines will go to the old one until you change DNS.  Once your happy you can bring it online. If something goes wrong, point it back to the old one.

    Wow I was just having a discussion about this with my colleague and that was exactly what we came up with as a good way to keep both RMS and AD-RMS since both can't exist in the same environment.

    Thanks for the response!

    Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:45 PM
  • Cool. I'm glad you didn't go to through all the complicated hoops yet of the other article.

    This really does work well. I have used it many times. You will just need to know you cluster key password and service account password and make absolutely sure you point to the new database when it asks you.

    The ONLY downside I can think of is you might have a logging gap because anything going to the old server while you test wont be reflected in the new server. Most people don't use the logging unless they are troubleshooting something so it's probably not an issue.

    -Eddie

    Thursday, May 8, 2014 10:55 PM