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Huge DPM database, possible problems with daily garbage collection RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have a DPM 2012 server with a tape library.  For the last three years we have not been allowed to prune the tape catalog.  Our DPM database is 488GB in size.  Last week we were allowed to turn on tape catalog pruning and set it to 30 days.  Our ARM_DirAndFile table is 402GB and our TE_TaskTrail table is 26GB.  Will these tables shrink now that we're purging our tape catalog?  Or, will need to manually run garbage collection?
    Thursday, February 14, 2019 12:34 AM

All replies

  • Hello!

    The tbl_TE_TAskTrail table contains the history of all DPM jobs that have run or failed.

    The ARM_DirAndFile table is used for recovery from tape, it is basically an online catalog of your tapes.

    DPM maintains a 30 days worth of job history and it's pruned nightly (every day at midnight) to delete jobs history older than 30 days, it should shrink these tables.

    Best regards,
    Leon


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Thursday, February 14, 2019 9:11 AM
  • Our tbl_TE_TaskTrail table has 8,146,445 rows.  It appears that the nightly clean up isn't working.  Is there a way to fix this?

    Thanks,

    Jim

    Thursday, February 14, 2019 7:29 PM
  • You could try shrinking the database manually:

    Please create a backup of your DPM DB before!

    1. Open  SQL Server Management Studio:

    2. Right-click your DPMDB and choose New Query.

    3. Enter the query below and run it:

    USE DPMDatabase
    ALTER DATABASE DPMDatabase SET RECOVERY SIMPLE
    DBCC SHRINKFILE (DPMDatabase_LogD, 50);
    ALTER DATABASE DPMDatabase SET RECOVERY FULL
    (Change the "DPMDatabase" to your DPM database name).


    4. Change back your DPM database recovery mode to Simple (Right-click your DPMDB > Properties > Options > Change recovery Model to Simple.)

    or you can shrink it as follows:

    Please create a backup of your DPM DB before!

    1. Open the SQL Management Studio.

    2. Right-click your DPMDB and choose New Query.

    3. Enter the query below and run it:

    GO
    DBCC SHRINKFILE('Database_Log', 1)
    GO


    You can refer to the link below for more information:

    DPMDB Maintenance Part 3: Dealing with a large DPMDB
    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/dpm/2015/04/01/dpmdb-maintenance-part-3-dealing-with-a-large-dpmdb/


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    • Proposed as answer by Leon Laude Friday, March 8, 2019 12:07 AM
    Thursday, February 14, 2019 7:55 PM
  • Hello!

    Just checking in to see if you have any update?


    Blog: https://thesystemcenterblog.com LinkedIn:

    Monday, February 18, 2019 10:46 PM