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Windows server 2019 - RAID5 (disk managament vs storage spaces) RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi.

    I have a few questions.

    What is the best practise on Windows Server 2019 to create software raid? Is it OK to create RAID5 inside (old) disk management or should it be done over Server Manger / Storage spaces? What are the pros and cons of doing it in one and other GUI?

    What RAID would you recommend if you have 8 NVMe disks? RAID5 or sth else? We were thinking about creating 2xRAID5 inside old disk management is that ok?

    How can you check the stripe size of a RAID that has been created in disk management? Is it a default 64 in RAID5 scenario?

    with best regards


    bostjanc

    Tuesday, May 14, 2019 11:07 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your question.

    Windows Server 2012 introduces Storage Spaces, Storage Spaces lets you group drives together in a storage pool. Then you can use pool capacity to create storage spaces. 

    Which is a new capability in Windows that enables the aggregation and virtualization of physical disks into logical groups, known as storage pools and storage spaces. You can choose the resiliency type of a storage space based on business needs, with choices of Simple (no resiliency), Mirror, and Parity. That's three kinds of virtual disk. For different function, you may refer to the link below.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/15200.storage-spaces-designing-for-performance.aspx

    1)For your first question, the following is a short list of storage spaces best practices:

    • Set your interleave to be at least as large as the most common I/O size from
    • the applications that will be reading from and writing to the storage space. If
    • you are unsure, use the default interleave size of 256 KB.
    • Unless your workload has very specific needs and is unlikely to grow
    • significantly, utilize the default column count chose by Spaces at creation
    • time.
    • When mixing disk types in the same storage pool, utilize manual disk
    • selection (-PhysicalDisksToUse parameter) when creating a virtual disk, or
    • separate different disk types into separate storage pools. Alternatively,
    • utilize Storage Tiering (Windows Server 2012 R2)
    • Do not use simple spaces unless resiliency is provided by the application or
    • is unnecessary.
    • Do not use parity spaces for workloads that are predominantly random in
    • nature. Parity spaces are optimized for highly sequential / append-style
    • workloads, such as archiving.
    • When using dedicated journal disks for parity spaces, deploy SSDs.

    Besides, ReFS stands for Resilient File System. NTFS has its place, and so does ReFS. While ReFS may appear to have some similarity to NTFS, it does not contain all the underlying NTFS features and scales efficiently to handle data sets far larger than NTFS.

    We can refer to the following thread for this details,

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/2693ec8f-6a1b-4faf-8334-4cc94c4df445/best-practices-to-set-up-storage-spaces-on-simple-standalone-file-server?forum=winserver8setup

    2) Is it OK to create RAID5 inside (old) disk management or should it be done over Server Manger / Storage spaces?>>>

    Deploy Parity Storage Space (that is RAID5) over Server Manager is better.

    Storage space enables a completely new way to think about and administer storage. With Storage Spaces, the physical disks that provide underlying data storage are completely abstracted from the process of requesting new volumes, now known as spaces. The Storage Spaces technology automatically performs any necessary actions to restore data redundancy if a disk fails, provided that sufficient physical disks are available.

    Although you can open the Disk Management Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in, examine the physical disks, convert them to dynamic disks if necessary, and then create a volume that meets your requirements. If the volume needs to grow, you might be able to extend it (depending on the physical disks), but you can't add additional disks to an existing volume, to provide easy scalability. For small and midsized organizations or even large organizations with smaller remote locations (i.e., locations with just a couple servers and for which neither SAN nor NAS is economical), providing a good storage solution for services is a huge problem. At the other end of the scale, power users on desktops also struggle to organize their data across internal drives and USB-connected disks.

    Reference:

    https://www.itprotoday.com/windows-78/windows-server-2012-storage-spaces

    3) What RAID would you recommend if you have 8 NVMe disks? RAID5 or sth else? We were thinking about creating 2xRAID5 inside old disk management is that ok?>>>

    It is recommended to deploy 2 virtual disks in storage pool with the Parity Storage Space (that is RAID5) using storage space GUI. Or we can also use powershell commands for this implementation.

    For the setup, we can refer to the following articles and video,

    https://redmondmag.com/articles/2018/07/31/storage-spaces-windows-server-2016-1.aspx

    https://redmondmag.com/articles/2018/08/02/storage-spaces-windows-server-2016-2.aspx

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzDotl9NKdY

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/storage-spaces/deploy-standalone-storage-spaces

    4How can you check the stripe size of a RAID that has been created in disk management? Is it a default 64 in RAID5 scenario?>>>

    Stripe size, also referred to as block size, refers to the size of the stripes written to each disk in a RAID array. Stripe size is typically measured in block sizes from 2 kiB to 512 kiB.  For optimum performance it is recommended to choose 64KB as the stripe size* when creating a RAID 5 logical drive.

    After researched, I didn’t observe default stripe size for soft RAID in MS disk management, whereas currently Microsoft Storage Spaces optimizes performance by striping data across multiple physical disks. The stripe size (interleave size) is set by default to 256 KB. This means that Microsoft Storage Spaces stores 256 KB of data per stripe on each disk.

    https://www.dell.com/support/manuals/sg/en/sgdhs1/storage-md1400-dsms/dsms_bpg_pub-v2/interleave-size?guid=guid-3b4b3770-242b-401d-b9f5-9502565cb994&lang=en-us

    We can try the following powershell commands to show the stripe value.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh848643.aspx

    Get-VirtualDisk -friendlyname <diskname> | fl

    Another blog which discussed performance for storage space in windows server 2012, within this OS version, default stripe size was still 64KB.

    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/wincat/2012/05/21/optimizing-windows-server-2012-storage-management-via-powershell-for-both-performance-and-resiliency/  

    Hope above information can help you. If you have any question or concern, please feel free to let me know.

    Best regards,

    Michael


    Please remember to mark the replies as an answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com

    • Marked as answer by B_C_R Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:03 AM
    Wednesday, May 15, 2019 7:19 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    Thanks for your question.

    Windows Server 2012 introduces Storage Spaces, Storage Spaces lets you group drives together in a storage pool. Then you can use pool capacity to create storage spaces. 

    Which is a new capability in Windows that enables the aggregation and virtualization of physical disks into logical groups, known as storage pools and storage spaces. You can choose the resiliency type of a storage space based on business needs, with choices of Simple (no resiliency), Mirror, and Parity. That's three kinds of virtual disk. For different function, you may refer to the link below.

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/15200.storage-spaces-designing-for-performance.aspx

    1)For your first question, the following is a short list of storage spaces best practices:

    • Set your interleave to be at least as large as the most common I/O size from
    • the applications that will be reading from and writing to the storage space. If
    • you are unsure, use the default interleave size of 256 KB.
    • Unless your workload has very specific needs and is unlikely to grow
    • significantly, utilize the default column count chose by Spaces at creation
    • time.
    • When mixing disk types in the same storage pool, utilize manual disk
    • selection (-PhysicalDisksToUse parameter) when creating a virtual disk, or
    • separate different disk types into separate storage pools. Alternatively,
    • utilize Storage Tiering (Windows Server 2012 R2)
    • Do not use simple spaces unless resiliency is provided by the application or
    • is unnecessary.
    • Do not use parity spaces for workloads that are predominantly random in
    • nature. Parity spaces are optimized for highly sequential / append-style
    • workloads, such as archiving.
    • When using dedicated journal disks for parity spaces, deploy SSDs.

    Besides, ReFS stands for Resilient File System. NTFS has its place, and so does ReFS. While ReFS may appear to have some similarity to NTFS, it does not contain all the underlying NTFS features and scales efficiently to handle data sets far larger than NTFS.

    We can refer to the following thread for this details,

    https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/2693ec8f-6a1b-4faf-8334-4cc94c4df445/best-practices-to-set-up-storage-spaces-on-simple-standalone-file-server?forum=winserver8setup

    2) Is it OK to create RAID5 inside (old) disk management or should it be done over Server Manger / Storage spaces?>>>

    Deploy Parity Storage Space (that is RAID5) over Server Manager is better.

    Storage space enables a completely new way to think about and administer storage. With Storage Spaces, the physical disks that provide underlying data storage are completely abstracted from the process of requesting new volumes, now known as spaces. The Storage Spaces technology automatically performs any necessary actions to restore data redundancy if a disk fails, provided that sufficient physical disks are available.

    Although you can open the Disk Management Microsoft Management Console (MMC) snap-in, examine the physical disks, convert them to dynamic disks if necessary, and then create a volume that meets your requirements. If the volume needs to grow, you might be able to extend it (depending on the physical disks), but you can't add additional disks to an existing volume, to provide easy scalability. For small and midsized organizations or even large organizations with smaller remote locations (i.e., locations with just a couple servers and for which neither SAN nor NAS is economical), providing a good storage solution for services is a huge problem. At the other end of the scale, power users on desktops also struggle to organize their data across internal drives and USB-connected disks.

    Reference:

    https://www.itprotoday.com/windows-78/windows-server-2012-storage-spaces

    3) What RAID would you recommend if you have 8 NVMe disks? RAID5 or sth else? We were thinking about creating 2xRAID5 inside old disk management is that ok?>>>

    It is recommended to deploy 2 virtual disks in storage pool with the Parity Storage Space (that is RAID5) using storage space GUI. Or we can also use powershell commands for this implementation.

    For the setup, we can refer to the following articles and video,

    https://redmondmag.com/articles/2018/07/31/storage-spaces-windows-server-2016-1.aspx

    https://redmondmag.com/articles/2018/08/02/storage-spaces-windows-server-2016-2.aspx

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzDotl9NKdY

    https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/storage-spaces/deploy-standalone-storage-spaces

    4How can you check the stripe size of a RAID that has been created in disk management? Is it a default 64 in RAID5 scenario?>>>

    Stripe size, also referred to as block size, refers to the size of the stripes written to each disk in a RAID array. Stripe size is typically measured in block sizes from 2 kiB to 512 kiB.  For optimum performance it is recommended to choose 64KB as the stripe size* when creating a RAID 5 logical drive.

    After researched, I didn’t observe default stripe size for soft RAID in MS disk management, whereas currently Microsoft Storage Spaces optimizes performance by striping data across multiple physical disks. The stripe size (interleave size) is set by default to 256 KB. This means that Microsoft Storage Spaces stores 256 KB of data per stripe on each disk.

    https://www.dell.com/support/manuals/sg/en/sgdhs1/storage-md1400-dsms/dsms_bpg_pub-v2/interleave-size?guid=guid-3b4b3770-242b-401d-b9f5-9502565cb994&lang=en-us

    We can try the following powershell commands to show the stripe value.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh848643.aspx

    Get-VirtualDisk -friendlyname <diskname> | fl

    Another blog which discussed performance for storage space in windows server 2012, within this OS version, default stripe size was still 64KB.

    https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/wincat/2012/05/21/optimizing-windows-server-2012-storage-management-via-powershell-for-both-performance-and-resiliency/  

    Hope above information can help you. If you have any question or concern, please feel free to let me know.

    Best regards,

    Michael


    Please remember to mark the replies as an answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com

    • Marked as answer by B_C_R Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:03 AM
    Wednesday, May 15, 2019 7:19 AM
    Moderator
  • Havent got sucha good and perfect answer for a long time. Thank u very much.

    bostjanc

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019 10:03 AM
  • You're welcome. I'm very glad the information is helpful to you. 

    Thanks for your sharing and support.

    Have a nice day!

    Best regards,

    Michael


    Please remember to mark the replies as an answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com

    Wednesday, May 15, 2019 2:43 PM
    Moderator