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Copying Vector Art from Word RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    Ever since we got Word 2010, I've experienced a bug when copying vector graphics from Word and trying to paste into Adobe Illustrator. Haven't found a solution yet, but I've seen discussions of others having the same problem when pasting into other graphics programs. So, it's not just with Illustrator. When I select and copy a vector image in Word, and then try to paste it into Illustrator, the pasted results have been rasterized. The image is no longer vector art. However; if I paste that same image into PowerPoint, copy it again while in PPT, and THEN paste it into Illustrator, it remains fully editable vector art. This problem did not exist before we got Word 2010. It appears that whatever is broken did not get broken in PPT 2010, but it did in Word 2010. Anybody know a solution? This workaround is somewhat simple. But I have LOTS of these to do.

    Thanks,
    Charlie Yarwood

    Monday, June 10, 2013 7:59 PM

Answers

  • Here is a link to a current discussion on the Word for the Mac forum. It involves a discussion about Vector graphics not maintaining their color when inserted. John McGhie's comments about how Vector graphics are stored in Word are interesting as it relates to your issue and I would conclude that when you use the copy/paste method that you are actually picking up is a placeholder, "watered down version", of the actual image. I've read elsewhere that Word converts images to PNG for its internal working.

    I can confirm your findings that PowerPoint functions differently and the images it displays are from their original format. I don't know if it always worked that way but I found it does now with 2007 and later. If you are copy/pasting images programmatically between PowerPoint and Word you can easily overload the clipboard... all due to the size of the EMF images.

    I don't know if it will help but I do have a plug-in app for Word and PowerPoint that will pull the images from a Word file (or PowerPoint) and make image files (PNG, JGP, EMF, and more) and it does it selectively or all at one time. You can try it for free and see if it helps for your work process.

    I would be interested to hear your comments on the image quality it extracted from a Word document. In theory, if the original images inserted in a Word document were EMF format then what is extracted and saved into an EMF format image file should be the same. zAPPs-apps-Collection


    Kind Regards, Rich ... http://greatcirclelearning.com

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Monday, June 17, 2013 3:31 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 5:36 PM
  • Thanks to Rich's suggestion, I just did some experimenting and learned one more tidbit of info. I opened one of the problem documents and saved it as a Word 97-2003 doc. After doing that, the copy/paste issue was corrected. Somehow; copying vector graphics from a DOCX rasterizes, but copying from a DOC (97-2003) does not. Go figger.

    :-)
    C Ya

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Monday, June 17, 2013 3:31 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 9:03 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Open the document in WordPad, copy the Vector Art again. Does issue occur?

    Best regards,


    Rex Zhang
    TechNet Community Support

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 9:09 AM
  • Thanks for the suggestion. It did the same thing when copied from WordPad. I know this suggests that the image might already be rasterized. But I'm pretty sure it's vector art. When in Word, I can select Edit Picture and Word will convert it to MS Office drawing (even though it totally discombobulates it). And as I mentioned before; if I use PowerPoint in between, vectors are maintained. MS Weird.  :-)

    C Ya

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 2:49 PM
  • There's always the ZIP method:
    Make a copy of the DOCX file, rename the file extension to ZIP, open the ZIP, extract the EMF files, open EMFs in AI. Not sure which saves more time - ZIP method, or PPT-middle-man. Direct copy/paste would be quickest if it worked.

    C Ya

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 2:54 PM
  • Here is a link to a current discussion on the Word for the Mac forum. It involves a discussion about Vector graphics not maintaining their color when inserted. John McGhie's comments about how Vector graphics are stored in Word are interesting as it relates to your issue and I would conclude that when you use the copy/paste method that you are actually picking up is a placeholder, "watered down version", of the actual image. I've read elsewhere that Word converts images to PNG for its internal working.

    I can confirm your findings that PowerPoint functions differently and the images it displays are from their original format. I don't know if it always worked that way but I found it does now with 2007 and later. If you are copy/pasting images programmatically between PowerPoint and Word you can easily overload the clipboard... all due to the size of the EMF images.

    I don't know if it will help but I do have a plug-in app for Word and PowerPoint that will pull the images from a Word file (or PowerPoint) and make image files (PNG, JGP, EMF, and more) and it does it selectively or all at one time. You can try it for free and see if it helps for your work process.

    I would be interested to hear your comments on the image quality it extracted from a Word document. In theory, if the original images inserted in a Word document were EMF format then what is extracted and saved into an EMF format image file should be the same. zAPPs-apps-Collection


    Kind Regards, Rich ... http://greatcirclelearning.com

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Monday, June 17, 2013 3:31 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 5:36 PM
  • Thanks Rich,

    That is indeed interesting - and probably the explanation. I'm not sure what version of Word we had been using before 2010. Must have been pre-2007, because I didn't have this issue problem then. I'll look into your plug-in ASAP.

    To elaborate on the ZIP method I outlined above. I had read somewhere that DOCX was really a souped-up ZIP file. If you re-name a DOCX file's extension to ZIP, and then open it as a ZIP file, you will find all the components of the document neatly stored in folders. One folder, named "Word", contains several subfolders; one of which is named "Media". The Media folder contains the original images that were inserted into the Word file, apparently still in their original formats. I tend to forget about this method when I get in a hurry. But 95% of the time, it gives me excellent results.

    I publish scientific journals (using Adobe InDesign) and I'm usually working with Word files supplied/created by university researchers who have created their graphs in exotic graphing programs, and then inserted them into Word. Their work flow is unknown to me and I'm not inclined to buy and install all the exotic programs they use. These research papers come in from all corners of the globe. It's occasionally a headache to deal with their inserted graphs, but I guess it's better than trying to work with their native files. I produce enough of these that I'm always on the lookout for ways to save hours, minutes, seconds.  :-)
    That having been said, sometimes I secretly like it when their graph is a pitifully low res JPG and I must resort to using it as a template and re-drawing it in Illustrator.  :-)

    But now I'm rambling.
    Thanks again!
    C Ya

    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 8:33 PM
  • Thanks to Rich's suggestion, I just did some experimenting and learned one more tidbit of info. I opened one of the problem documents and saved it as a Word 97-2003 doc. After doing that, the copy/paste issue was corrected. Somehow; copying vector graphics from a DOCX rasterizes, but copying from a DOC (97-2003) does not. Go figger.

    :-)
    C Ya

    • Marked as answer by Rex Zhang Monday, June 17, 2013 3:31 AM
    Wednesday, June 12, 2013 9:03 PM