locked
Best practices for SQL Server setup with ConfigMgr 2012... RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hey guys,

    First off - Congrats on shipping ConfigMgr 2012 and launching the new forum!


    Second - I have two questions related to the install and configuration of SQL Server for the ConfigMgr 2012 database. I'm setting up ConfigMgr 2012 on a two disk box. I'll use it to manage about 1800+ clients at various offices across the country. Obviously I plan to locate my OS (Windows 2008 R2) on one drive and my ConfigMgr Database on the other. My question is this:


    Should I:

    Install SQL Server in the default Program Files location on the OS drive, and then change my default Database location AFTER the install?

    or

    Just change the SQL Server install location to point to my second drive from the outset? 



    • Edited by ZeusABJ Thursday, April 19, 2012 4:56 AM
    • Moved by Stan White [MSFT]Microsoft employee Friday, April 20, 2012 11:28 PM Moving to correct forum category for the topic (From:Configuration Manager 2012 - General)
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 4:56 AM

Answers

  • I would go with diff drive for SQL installation. Look at the real world experience which is shared by Shitanshu.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/shitanshu/archive/2012/04/10/configuration-manager-2012-hardware-configuration-used-in-microsoft-it.aspx


    Anoop C Nair - @anoopmannur

    MY BLOG:  http://anoopmannur.wordpress.com

    User Group:  ConfigMgr Professionals

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties/guarantees and confers no rights.

    • Marked as answer by ZeusABJ Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:27 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 5:51 AM
  • Should I:
    Install SQL Server in the default Program Files location on the OS drive, and then change my default Database location AFTER the install?
    or
    Just change the SQL Server install location to point to my second drive from the outset? 

    Hi,

    1# The OS drive should contain only OS files (the best practice for Windows).

    2# I always install SQL in a separate drive and never in the OS one.

    2# For better performance and SQL best practices, DB/TempDB/LogFile should be on seperate drives (different drives than OS and SQL install) with recommended RAID config of course.

    Anoop's link is good, read it.


    Bechir Gharbi | http://myitforum.com/myitforumwp/community/members/bgharbi/ | Time zone : GMT+1

    • Proposed as answer by Jörgen NilssonMVP Thursday, April 19, 2012 12:25 PM
    • Marked as answer by ZeusABJ Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:27 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 6:52 AM

All replies

  • I would go with diff drive for SQL installation. Look at the real world experience which is shared by Shitanshu.

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/shitanshu/archive/2012/04/10/configuration-manager-2012-hardware-configuration-used-in-microsoft-it.aspx


    Anoop C Nair - @anoopmannur

    MY BLOG:  http://anoopmannur.wordpress.com

    User Group:  ConfigMgr Professionals

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties/guarantees and confers no rights.

    • Marked as answer by ZeusABJ Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:27 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 5:51 AM
  • Should I:
    Install SQL Server in the default Program Files location on the OS drive, and then change my default Database location AFTER the install?
    or
    Just change the SQL Server install location to point to my second drive from the outset? 

    Hi,

    1# The OS drive should contain only OS files (the best practice for Windows).

    2# I always install SQL in a separate drive and never in the OS one.

    2# For better performance and SQL best practices, DB/TempDB/LogFile should be on seperate drives (different drives than OS and SQL install) with recommended RAID config of course.

    Anoop's link is good, read it.


    Bechir Gharbi | http://myitforum.com/myitforumwp/community/members/bgharbi/ | Time zone : GMT+1

    • Proposed as answer by Jörgen NilssonMVP Thursday, April 19, 2012 12:25 PM
    • Marked as answer by ZeusABJ Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:27 PM
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 6:52 AM
  • Anoop, Bechir - Thanks so much for the advice and link.

    I appreciate it!
    Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:28 PM
  • One additional point to add: when Anoop and Bechir (and anyone else talksing about perofrmance) says "drive", they mean an actual dedicated physical drive or dedicated set of physical drives. Drive letters, partitions, and LUNs are all logical separations of drive space that do not represent anything physical behind the scenes and can be shared between multiple resources thus reducing performance.

    Jason | http://blog.configmgrftw.com | Twitter @JasonSandys

    Monday, April 23, 2012 2:31 PM