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Windows Server Technical Preview Done Right RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Thank You, thank you, thank you, thank you!  This is how Windows Server 2012/2012 R2 should have been from the start.

    Friday, October 3, 2014 12:15 AM

All replies

  • How few necessary for people from new versions of Windows Server
    Friday, October 3, 2014 10:17 AM
  • Its been a long time coming.  Glad you like the return

    Thanks, John Marlin Microsoft Server Beta Team

    Monday, October 6, 2014 8:40 PM
  • The different reactions are interesting on this.  I pretty much stopped using the Start menu when Vista and 2008 came out.  Yes, I would click the button (or pearl) but then I would immediately start typing and the system would find what I was looking for a heck of a lot faster than I could trying to navigate the menu.  So when Windows 8/Windows Server 2012 came along, I never even missed it.  Got used to hitting the Windows key and typing what I'm looking for.  That way I can keep my hands on the keyboard.

    But, variety is the spice of life.  Whatever makes you happy, happy, happy.


    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Tuesday, October 7, 2014 10:57 PM
  • I had become quite comfortable with Server 2012 R2 as I have been using it, and Windows 8, since the release of the Developer’s Preview.  To administer any of my servers, I typically use RSAT and Server Manager from my workstation.  Nonetheless, there were some times when physically at a server, I would find it annoying to have to navigate the Start screen.  The built-in search feature—although very useful—is at times slow.

    At my place of employment, there are other sysadmins who refuse to even look at Server 2012 R2.  One guy just walked away once he saw the Start screen and vowed to never touch it again.

    With the return of the Start Menu, I believe Microsoft will now have the ability to coax users and businesses to upgrade to the latest version.  There are people who are just now migrating to Server 2008 R2.

    Wednesday, October 8, 2014 6:55 PM
  • Understood. But that's why I chuckle. I remember people who refused to even look at Windows 95 because the GUI was introduced and they still wanted to do everything via the command line. Of course, now that nearly everything can be done from the command line (PowerShell) again, you have those people who want their GUI. Yes, I agree that the change enables the satisfaction of more users.

    Of course, it is very simple to modify the Tools menu on Server Manager to pretty much replace the Start button (a feature that was there from the Windows 95 days through the present), but if someone walks away, well ...


    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Wednesday, October 8, 2014 8:02 PM
  • The different reactions are interesting on this.  I pretty much stopped using the Start menu when Vista and 2008 came out.  Yes, I would click the button (or pearl) but then I would immediately start typing and the system would find what I was looking for a heck of a lot faster than I could trying to navigate the menu.  So when Windows 8/Windows Server 2012 came along, I never even missed it.  Got used to hitting the Windows key and typing what I'm looking for.  That way I can keep my hands on the keyboard.

    But, variety is the spice of life.  Whatever makes you happy, happy, happy.


    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Well, now it allows it to be done both ways and it doesn't bounce you out of the desktop for the search.

    I found it convenient to have frequently used items pinned to the Start Menu and Task Bar, but if it was a less-used item that was buried levels deep in hierarchy of the Start Menu, I would use the search field in the Start Menu.

    Searching was rarely needed because I didn't use that many different apps.


    • Edited by MyGposts Sunday, October 12, 2014 4:38 PM
    Sunday, October 12, 2014 4:36 PM