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Accessing Restricted Folders RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a secondary hard drive attached through an external enclosure.  I've noticed that though I have only 48 GB of files on it, the drive has 96 GB used up.  The size grows continuously.  After a bit of research , I found that it was in F:/System Volume Information.  I am the sole administrator of the computer, and when I try to open it, it says that access is restricted.  I turned the computer on in safe boot, but I still can't access the folder.

    Can anyone give me tips as to how to get in there?  If this is a common problem with a common solution, how do I fix it?  Please note that I am still using W7 RC1, as I don't quite have the money to buy the full thing yet.
    Friday, January 15, 2010 8:27 PM

Answers

  • I have a secondary hard drive attached through an external enclosure.  I've noticed that though I have only 48 GB of files on it, the drive has 96 GB used up.  The size grows continuously.  After a bit of research , I found that it was in F:/System Volume Information.  I am the sole administrator of the computer, and when I try to open it, it says that access is restricted.  I turned the computer on in safe boot, but I still can't access the folder.

    Can anyone give me tips as to how to get in there?  If this is a common problem with a common solution, how do I fix it?  Please note that I am still using W7 RC1, as I don't quite have the money to buy the full thing yet.
    Hi

    The System Volume Information folder is the where all of the System Restore Points are kept. The permissions on that folder are set to Everyone/Access Denied.

    It's a good idea to clean up the System Restore Points as part of a normal maintenance routine.

    1. Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories / System Tools / Disk Cleanup.

    2. In the drop down menu, select the drive you want to clean up and click OK. The drive will be scanned.

    3. In the next window, select the Clean up system files button.

    4. Select the drive again and click OK.

    5. In the next window, select the More Options Tab. In the System Restore and Shadow Copies section, click the Clean up button and click OK.

    6. In the next window, select the Delete Button.

    This will remove all of the temporary files, recycle Bin, etc, and all but the latest System Restore Points.

    Check the free space on that drive again.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP



    Friday, January 15, 2010 9:05 PM

All replies

  • I have a secondary hard drive attached through an external enclosure.  I've noticed that though I have only 48 GB of files on it, the drive has 96 GB used up.  The size grows continuously.  After a bit of research , I found that it was in F:/System Volume Information.  I am the sole administrator of the computer, and when I try to open it, it says that access is restricted.  I turned the computer on in safe boot, but I still can't access the folder.

    Can anyone give me tips as to how to get in there?  If this is a common problem with a common solution, how do I fix it?  Please note that I am still using W7 RC1, as I don't quite have the money to buy the full thing yet.
    Hi

    The System Volume Information folder is the where all of the System Restore Points are kept. The permissions on that folder are set to Everyone/Access Denied.

    It's a good idea to clean up the System Restore Points as part of a normal maintenance routine.

    1. Go to Start / All Programs / Accessories / System Tools / Disk Cleanup.

    2. In the drop down menu, select the drive you want to clean up and click OK. The drive will be scanned.

    3. In the next window, select the Clean up system files button.

    4. Select the drive again and click OK.

    5. In the next window, select the More Options Tab. In the System Restore and Shadow Copies section, click the Clean up button and click OK.

    6. In the next window, select the Delete Button.

    This will remove all of the temporary files, recycle Bin, etc, and all but the latest System Restore Points.

    Check the free space on that drive again.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP



    Friday, January 15, 2010 9:05 PM
  • That did it!  Thirty more GB are now free...  Thanks.

    But do you know why system restore points are taking up ~18 GB apiece?  My main drive is 38 GB with 20 GB used, a lot of which is media (to be moved), and the secondary drive is 232 GB with 60 GB used (48 GB of my stuff, and apparently a 12 GB system restore point).  I don't run many and/or large programs (other than MS Office), and there's not a ton of details associated with the computer...  I'm not sure how the system restore points are so many GB, when the only information to back up outside of media would be the bare OS.
    Friday, January 15, 2010 10:39 PM
  • That did it!  Thirty more GB are now free...  Thanks.

    But do you know why system restore points are taking up ~18 GB apiece?  My main drive is 38 GB with 20 GB used, a lot of which is media (to be moved), and the secondary drive is 232 GB with 60 GB used (48 GB of my stuff, and apparently a 12 GB system restore point).  I don't run many and/or large programs (other than MS Office), and there's not a ton of details associated with the computer...  I'm not sure how the system restore points are so many GB, when the only information to back up outside of media would be the bare OS.
    Hi

    You can easily control the allocated disk space that System Restore is allowed to use.

    Open Control Panel / System.

    On the left side menu, select System Protection.

    In the Disk Space Usage section, move the slider to set the maximum amount of disk space.

    5-8 GB is usually enough space to store a dozenl system restore points.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP


    Saturday, January 16, 2010 3:56 AM
  • That did it.  Again, thanks.
    Saturday, January 16, 2010 5:55 PM