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Login in times are execessive after reboot or startup RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a client site where all PCs are running Windows 7 Professional SP1, all up to date on patching. DC runs Server 2012 and a file server also runs Server 2012. Both servers are VMs in a Hyper-V 2012 server.

    One user is having a problem no one else has. After the computer is started up from power off or after a reboot, when the user logs in, it almost always takes an excessive amount of time from when she enters her password to when she gets the desktop and can start working. It can be anywhere from 5-11 minutes.

    After a reboot, if I login with our company's domain account, we get the desktop right away. Also, if she logs in after having logged out or after I have logged out, then her login is quick and she gets to the desktop right away. Her lengthy login is only after a reboot or power up.

    She is using folder redirection like all other users, though our account doesn't. I don't think that is the cause of the problem though as if it was then all other users would have the same problem and when she logs in after a logoff it should also be lengthy.

    I've looked in the event logs and the only thing I can find are warnings from Winlogon of 6005 and 6006. But they're so generic it really doesn't point me in any direction.

    Any help in diagnosing this would be appreciated. I'm stumped as to where to look next.


    Jonathan

    Thursday, October 2, 2014 3:10 PM

Answers

All replies

  • Perform a clean boot and check the results : support.microsoft.com/kb/929135


    Arnav Sharma | http://arnavsharma.net/ Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.

    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:51 AM
    Thursday, October 2, 2014 11:32 PM
  • Check the logon script GPO which maps the printers.

    computer->policies->admin templates->printers->Point and Print Restrictions->Disabled


    Joseph Ndlovu

    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:51 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by SmallBizAdmin Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:10 PM
    Friday, October 3, 2014 2:09 AM
  • Hi,

    Slow logon can be caused by many factors, such as network, group policy processing, logon script, patches, etc. You can find more infromation in the link below:

    Root Causes for Slow Boots and Logons

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/10130.root-causes-for-slow-boots-and-logons-sbsl.aspx

    You can refer to the following link to collect the logon trace file and make a further analysis

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/askpfeplat/archive/2012/06/09/slow-boot-slow-logon-sbsl-a-tool-called-xperf-and-links-you-need-to-read.aspx

    And this link cna also be helpful

    So you have a slow logon…?

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/askds/archive/2009/09/23/so-you-have-a-slow-logon-part-1.aspx


    Yolanda Zhu
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by arnavsharma Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:51 AM
    Friday, October 3, 2014 5:23 AM
  • Check the logon script GPO which maps the printers.

    computer->policies->admin templates->printers->Point and Print Restrictions->Disabled


    Joseph Ndlovu

    Thanks for the idea. I checked the GPO and that option was already set to Disabled.


    Jonathan

    Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:09 PM
  • Thanks for the answers everyone.

    I was going to use xperf but I found that after rebooting if you wait 3-5 minutes after the password prompt appears before trying to login, then login takes place quite quickly. So it's not something in the user profile or something triggered by a login but rather something that has to complete what it's doing before you login. I was able to reproduce this over and over.

    The manager at this client site is rather cost conscious and she did not want me spending anymore time on it since we now know what a workaround for the problem is.

    The user was shutting down her PC almost every night due to something she had been told a long time ago. I explained it wasn't necessary except when installing updates every month or when there is one of those problems that just requires a reboot. I told her to just logoff or lock the desktop and she was happy with that and is now aware that when she does have to reboot, to just wait a few minutes after the password prompt appears before trying to login.

    I would have liked to have tried xperf to see just what the problem is, but I'm not giving my time away. If they ever decide they want to pay to get the problem actually fixed, then I'll use xperf.


    Jonathan

    Wednesday, October 8, 2014 1:17 PM