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Task Approval before Publishing RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    I have received a requirement to customize our Project Server 2013 implementation as follows:

    * Several project managers can add tasks to the same project plan

    * A centralized focal point is  responsible of auditing and validating added tasks

    * When a project manager adds new tasks, the focal point gets notified by email.

    * The focal point has to approve or reject the added tasks. If he / she approves them, the tasks are published. If he / she rejects them, the tasks are removed from the plan.

    Are there any recommendations on the best way to implement these requirements? I have looked into Project Server workflow but they does not seem to support such requirements.

    Thanks in advance.

    Monday, April 9, 2018 6:23 AM

Answers

  • Hello Moezz.

    It's a complex requirement but I'll try to break it down.

    If your "focal point" is a user and he/she will be responsible for the schedule, then, regarding PWA, he/she is the project owner. The users you add to the project team, by default can "propose" new tasks. That is, they can create new tasks from "My tasks" and this new task will be redirected to the Project Owner for approval. PWA also notifies (if alers and notifications are configured) the Project Owner about this request and if he/she approves the new task, it will appear in the project schedule.

    That's default behaviour of PWA so you really do not need to develop a workflow for this to work.

    Workflows (developed with SharePoint Designer) act on the project level so you cannot control tasks with them.

    Hope it helps.


    Rene Alvarez

    Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:34 PM
  • In that case, you certainly can tackle down this using a different approach.

    If you set permissions for all those users as project managers, then you have two options:

    1. On the same project, even if you only have one project owner, you could have other users with permissions to modify the schedule and add their own tasks. Two things here: the user that first publishes a task is the "status manager" for that task, meaning that he/she will be the one to receive task updates, not the project owner; this scenario can be difficult to manage because of several users trying to modify the very same schedule.
    2. You can use master projects and subprojects. Project managers create their own project (as a piece of a major project) and then, the focal point creates a project where he/she will insert the other projects. Like this, you can summarize data from all smaller projects and still maintain control over who changes what.

    Best regards.


    Rene Alvarez

    Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:31 PM

All replies

  • Hello Moezz.

    It's a complex requirement but I'll try to break it down.

    If your "focal point" is a user and he/she will be responsible for the schedule, then, regarding PWA, he/she is the project owner. The users you add to the project team, by default can "propose" new tasks. That is, they can create new tasks from "My tasks" and this new task will be redirected to the Project Owner for approval. PWA also notifies (if alers and notifications are configured) the Project Owner about this request and if he/she approves the new task, it will appear in the project schedule.

    That's default behaviour of PWA so you really do not need to develop a workflow for this to work.

    Workflows (developed with SharePoint Designer) act on the project level so you cannot control tasks with them.

    Hope it helps.


    Rene Alvarez

    Wednesday, April 25, 2018 7:34 PM
  • Thanks for the clarification Rene. My aim mainly was to confirm that there should be one project owner / manager per project since the business requirement here was to have multiple project managers adding tasks for their team members, not themselves. 
    Thursday, April 26, 2018 6:39 AM
  • In that case, you certainly can tackle down this using a different approach.

    If you set permissions for all those users as project managers, then you have two options:

    1. On the same project, even if you only have one project owner, you could have other users with permissions to modify the schedule and add their own tasks. Two things here: the user that first publishes a task is the "status manager" for that task, meaning that he/she will be the one to receive task updates, not the project owner; this scenario can be difficult to manage because of several users trying to modify the very same schedule.
    2. You can use master projects and subprojects. Project managers create their own project (as a piece of a major project) and then, the focal point creates a project where he/she will insert the other projects. Like this, you can summarize data from all smaller projects and still maintain control over who changes what.

    Best regards.


    Rene Alvarez

    Thursday, April 26, 2018 1:31 PM