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Windows 10 Build 10240 Managing Hyper-V on 2012 R2 Datacenter Cannot Connect

    Question

  • So, we have a total of six Hyper-V servers in our environment. All six were installed from the same Server 2012 R2 Datacenter ISO. I have been managing these from my Windows 8.1 machine with no issues. I got ahold of Windows 10 build 10240, and I am running into an issue connecting to the servers now.

    The strange thing is that I CAN connect to one of them. I cannot figure out what is different on this one server from the other five. Windows updates maybe? I migrated all the VMs off one of the servers I cannot manage remotely, performed all Windows Updates, and I still cannot connect to it.

    I am reading that Windows 10 should be backward-compatible with managing Hyper-V on 2012, but on connection, it appears a WMI namespace is missing that the Windows 10 tools are trying to connect to.

    I am not trying to use alternate credentials (I read this will NOT work from 10 to 2012 R2). Any ideas why this is not working? Several Google searches have not told me anything so far. I realize Windows 10 has not officially been released yet, but a few of us are testing the waters for compatibility issues.

    I would appreciate any help anybody can offer.

    Eric

    EDIT: Just to have the solution at the top of the thread, thanks to BrianEh below, the WMI namespace became corrupted due to an HP software update. Reregistering the MOF fixes the issue.

    Run Elevated:

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof


    • Edited by Mako-Wish Tuesday, January 31, 2017 4:17 PM
    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 5:28 AM

Answers

  • I just received an interesting reply:

    If the error message is “The WS-Management service cannot process the request.  The class Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace” it’s a bug in an HP specific update.  Recompiling the .mof should fix it.

    run “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof”

    If receiving “can’t connect” errors for other reasons, it could be because remote management isn’t enabled or alternate creds or an IP is being used to connect to a down-level host.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.

    • Marked as answer by Mako-Wish Tuesday, August 04, 2015 6:01 PM
    Tuesday, August 04, 2015 5:48 PM
    Moderator
  • Got it!!!

    I was thinking, if there is an issue with a WMI namespace, let's try rebuilding WMI. I tried the BAT file here:

    http://www.lansweeper.com/kb/47/How-to-repair-a-corrupt-WMI-installation.html

    And I am now able to connect to the servers via Windows 10 Hyper-V Manager. I had to add three "NET START" lines at the end for services that did not automatically restart with the script, but this worked on all my hosts. The strange thing is, even before rebuilding WMI, I could manage them without issue from my Windows 8.1 machine. Only my Windows 10 devices were giving me an issue.

    TAGS for any Internet Searches:

    Windows 10 10240 Hyper-V Manager 2012 R2 Server An error occurred while attempting to connect to server [SERVER]. Check that the Virtual Machine Management service is running and that you are authorized to connect to the server. The WS-Management service cannot process the request. The class Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace.

    • Marked as answer by Mako-Wish Wednesday, July 22, 2015 9:06 PM
    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 9:06 PM

All replies

  • If I understand correctly, you are running Hyper-V from a 2012 R2 Server Datacenter installation and using Windows 10 to do the actual management? 

    Brian Elhert makes an excellent comment, related to Hyper-V Server, but it's quite applicable to Hyper-V on the Windows Server platform (for the time being - this may change when Win 10 is released into the wilds of the marketplace).

    <quote>Historically the version of the management tools must match the release of the target system being managed.

    I am curious where you got the impression that Windows 10 Hyper-V Manager can manage Windows 8.1 / 2012 R2 Hyper-V.

    From a namespace standpoint it should work, but there will be some features that don't align.  Since the Hyper-V Manager is all about using WMI and the virtualization namespace.

    There are other management consoles that still used dcom, but Hyper-V is not one.

    In regards to the hvremote script.  That was technically deprecated with 2012 R2 when Hyper-V moved away from using Authorization Manager.  Yes, it could still work, but it is no longer the basis for authorizing actions to users.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.

    </quote>

    Here: https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/f7b4d00c-7808-4666-bd81-32e78fdb4087/using-windows-10-hyperv-manager-to-manage-hyperv-server-2012r2-hosts?forum=winserverhyperv

    The key thing is, Windows 10 "should be" compatible and whilst you may have some success, it is a bit of slog and definitely not pretty. 


    Cheers! Andrew

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 11:26 AM
  • Hi Andrew,

    Thank you for the reply. I am seeing the reference to Windows 10 managing 2012 in many places, but here is the first one I found again just this morning:

    http://windowsitpro.com/hyper-v/windows-10-hyper-v-management

    Q: I'm using Windows 10 Hyper-V Manager with an older Hyper-V server, but using alternate credentials isn't working; why not?

    A: The new Hyper-V Manager in Windows 10 has several nice features, including the ability to manage down-level Hyper-V servers such as Windows Server 2012. In addition, it provides the ability to use alternate credentials, which is possible because of its shift to WS-MAN for configuration. However, the alternate credential capability is only for Windows 10 instances; alternate credentials can't be used with older Hyper-V servers that don't use WS-MAN.

    In addition to pages like this saying it can be done, I have seen other forums where users mention, "I can connect to my 2012 Hyper-V servers, but why can't I connect to  my 2008 R2 Hyper-V servers." The responses to these have been exactly the quote above. So, people have been able to successfully connect to 2012 servers. As I said, I can connect to one, just not the other five. The one is on older hardware, but the same exact OS build.

    I am thinking maybe a feature that isn't installed? I am going to dig deeper today as to why I can connect to the one, but not the others.

    Thank you,

    Eric

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:14 PM
  • I am checking with the product team regarding some tips to manage downlevel Hyper-V Servers.

    There are obviously some hitches, since I got one reply very quickly and a second immediate comment they needed a full keyboard.  So, there must be a few potential things to consider.

    BTW - There will be no way to manage versions of Hyper-V older than 2012 with a 2012 R2 or newer version of Hyper-V Manager.  This is due to a change in the API that happened with the 2012 release.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 3:26 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Brian,

    Thank you also for the reply. Managing 2008 R2 will not be an issue, as we are not running any 2008 R2 Hyper-V servers, and I was already aware of the down-level management not working from there. I just want it to work with our 2012 R2 servers. :-)

    Thank you,

    Eric

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 4:09 PM
  • Just to give an update, I queried all installed roles and features of all six 2012 R2 Datacenter servers. The only discrepancy that all servers had except the one that I CAN manage is SNMP Service, and SNMP WMI Provider being installed. Those were installed for the use of HP SIM. I am removing it from one of the non-manageable servers now. I really do not think the is the issue, but why not try, right?

    You know what? Just as I was about to restart the host, I realized from my Windows 8.1 VM that the one server I can manage does not have a license key installed. It is showing in Server Manager as "Not activated". We do have the license, but I have not installed it yet. That is the only other difference I have found so far. I doubt that could do it, but who knows?

    Eric

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 4:49 PM
  • Another update, but still no resolution...

    In order to perform live migrations remotely, Kerberos delegation must be enabled on all the hosts. I just realized/remembered that the one server I CAN connect to is our lab server. We have never, nor did we ever plan to migrate any VMs to or from our lab server, so we never enabled Kerberos delegations on this host. Just as a test, I removed the delegations from one of the machines I cannot connect to, but this has made no difference.

    I am still baffled as to how I can connect to one machine, but not the other five. The license idea is the only remaining difference I can think of.

    To note: I also tried opening MMC and adding the Hyper-V Snap-In, but I get the same error from there.

    Sigh...

    Eric

    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 8:42 PM
  • Got it!!!

    I was thinking, if there is an issue with a WMI namespace, let's try rebuilding WMI. I tried the BAT file here:

    http://www.lansweeper.com/kb/47/How-to-repair-a-corrupt-WMI-installation.html

    And I am now able to connect to the servers via Windows 10 Hyper-V Manager. I had to add three "NET START" lines at the end for services that did not automatically restart with the script, but this worked on all my hosts. The strange thing is, even before rebuilding WMI, I could manage them without issue from my Windows 8.1 machine. Only my Windows 10 devices were giving me an issue.

    TAGS for any Internet Searches:

    Windows 10 10240 Hyper-V Manager 2012 R2 Server An error occurred while attempting to connect to server [SERVER]. Check that the Virtual Machine Management service is running and that you are authorized to connect to the server. The WS-Management service cannot process the request. The class Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace.

    • Marked as answer by Mako-Wish Wednesday, July 22, 2015 9:06 PM
    Wednesday, July 22, 2015 9:06 PM
  • I just received an interesting reply:

    If the error message is “The WS-Management service cannot process the request.  The class Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace” it’s a bug in an HP specific update.  Recompiling the .mof should fix it.

    run “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof”

    If receiving “can’t connect” errors for other reasons, it could be because remote management isn’t enabled or alternate creds or an IP is being used to connect to a down-level host.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.

    • Marked as answer by Mako-Wish Tuesday, August 04, 2015 6:01 PM
    Tuesday, August 04, 2015 5:48 PM
    Moderator
  • That makes total sense. Completely rebuilding WMI worked for me, but I suppose just the one MOF would have worked. The servers are HP G7's, so I have no doubt this could have been the cause.

    Thank you for looking further into this Brian!

    Tuesday, August 04, 2015 6:01 PM
  • beware if you run  “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof” it does fix the issue but  afterwards  you will have issues with System center virtual  machine manage running  jobs on that particular host. Some things worked but  most reconfigurations  via VMM would fail  or behave as completed but changes never made. All seemed to be working  until I tried to  apply a logical switch configuration to the host. I rolled back the host  back to the  its configuration prior to a running the mofcom command and all is back to normal. Since I have several test hosts  I was able to replicate the identical issue on another Hyper-v 2012R2 host (just to rule out it was not the particular host). Though I have VMM there are certain functionalities that it does not have that are available in the native Hyper-v manager. All my test hosts are  on  Dell  servers (11th and 12th  generation PowerEdge)  so the issue is not isolated to HP servers. The windows 10 clients are running windows 10 enterprise ( new install rtm). removing the host and re-adding the host in VMM I did not try but could be a resolve to the issue of VMM no longer able to manage the host after the  running the  mof command but due to time constraints and needing the test host did not try this but will try at a latter time.
    • Edited by Phil_Jehl Saturday, August 22, 2015 9:22 PM
    Saturday, August 22, 2015 8:52 PM
  • I just received an interesting reply:

    If the error message is “The WS-Management service cannot process the request.  The class Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace” it’s a bug in an HP specific update.  Recompiling the .mof should fix it.

    run “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof”

    If receiving “can’t connect” errors for other reasons, it could be because remote management isn’t enabled or alternate creds or an IP is being used to connect to a down-level host.


    Brian Ehlert
    http://ITProctology.blogspot.com
    Learn. Apply. Repeat.

    Thanks so much for this!

    We had one HP Proliant ML350 Gen8 server running win 2012 r2 which was showing mentioned error hyper-v manager upon connection attempt from windows 10 pro x64. simple MOF recompilation fixed it on the go, thanks!

    Monday, August 24, 2015 7:42 PM
  • Hello
    as soon as the command executed works connecting Windows 10.
    However, no boot sequence except file appears then at Gen2 VMs under firmware.
    It can therefore no longer be booted from DVD.

    Event log error 14026:

    "Neuer virtueller Computer" fehlt ein Prüfpunkt. Die fehlenden Datenträgerpfade werden normalerweise im folgenden Pfad gespeichert: H:\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks\Neuer virtueller Computer.vhdx. Das System kann die angegebene Datei nicht finden. (0x80070002) (ID des virtuellen Computers: CBDB9206-9F72-4E18-9821-02893D78D0AC)

    On PowerShell is the same:

    Can anyone help me please?

    Monday, August 31, 2015 2:54 PM
  • That worked for me too.
    Tuesday, September 01, 2015 9:32 PM
  • Hello
    as soon as the command executed works connecting Windows 10.
    However, no boot sequence except file appears then at Gen2 VMs under firmware.
    It can therefore no longer be booted from DVD.

    Event log error 14026:

    "Neuer virtueller Computer" fehlt ein Prüfpunkt. Die fehlenden Datenträgerpfade werden normalerweise im folgenden Pfad gespeichert: H:\Hyper-V\Virtual Hard Disks\Neuer virtueller Computer.vhdx. Das System kann die angegebene Datei nicht finden. (0x80070002) (ID des virtuellen Computers: CBDB9206-9F72-4E18-9821-02893D78D0AC)

    On PowerShell is the same:

    Can anyone help me please?

    I, too, can confirm this behavior.  After rebuilding the .mof I have lost all firmware files, and I can no longer create new Gen2 virtual machines in secure boot mode.
    Wednesday, September 09, 2015 9:15 PM
  • beware if you run  “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof” it does fix the issue but  afterwards  you will have issues with System center virtual  machine manage running  jobs on that particular host. Some things worked but  most reconfigurations  via VMM would fail  or behave as completed but changes never made. All seemed to be working  until I tried to  apply a logical switch configuration to the host. I rolled back the host  back to the  its configuration prior to a running the mofcom command and all is back to normal. Since I have several test hosts  I was able to replicate the identical issue on another Hyper-v 2012R2 host (just to rule out it was not the particular host). Though I have VMM there are certain functionalities that it does not have that are available in the native Hyper-v manager. All my test hosts are  on  Dell  servers (11th and 12th  generation PowerEdge)  so the issue is not isolated to HP servers. The windows 10 clients are running windows 10 enterprise ( new install rtm). removing the host and re-adding the host in VMM I did not try but could be a resolve to the issue of VMM no longer able to manage the host after the  running the  mof command but due to time constraints and needing the test host did not try this but will try at a latter time.

    Heya Phil,

    Is there any way that you know of to repair the damage caused by rebuilding the .mof if rolling back is not an optoin?

    Thanks,
    Jeff

    Wednesday, September 09, 2015 9:18 PM
  • Okay All, I think I've figured out how to repair the damage caused by the MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof command.

    Take note of all your Hyper-V settings, such as Virtual Hard Drive location, Config File locations, Virtual Switches, etc. and then simply remove and re-install the Hyper-V role.  You shouldn't need to worry about the guest configs, only the Hyper-V configurations, but feel free to be cautions.

    After the removal and reinstallation of Hyper-V all of your VMs will still be listed and configured as they were prior to the removal of the role.  Your boot firmware files will be restored and you can still manage Hyper-V from Windows 10.  I suspect it may even fix the System Center issue you were having Phil, as that I was no longer able to manage my VMs on a Windows 7 box using 5nine Manager after the MOFCOMP command, but it too is working now.

    The only re-config I did on my guests was to change the boot firmware on each from "File bootmgfw.efi" to the system .vhdx, but otherwise no configuration required.

    I wonder if simply removing and re-adding the role would have corrected the Windows 10 issue to start out with? :-)

    Thanks,
    Jeff

    • Proposed as answer by Fregi Ventum Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:15 AM
    Thursday, September 10, 2015 12:00 AM
  • Okay All, I think I've figured out how to repair the damage caused by the MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof command.

    Take note of all your Hyper-V settings, such as Virtual Hard Drive location, Config File locations, Virtual Switches, etc. and then simply remove and re-install the Hyper-V role.  You shouldn't need to worry about the guest configs, only the Hyper-V configurations, but feel free to be cautions.

    After the removal and reinstallation of Hyper-V all of your VMs will still be listed and configured as they were prior to the removal of the role.  Your boot firmware files will be restored and you can still manage Hyper-V from Windows 10.  I suspect it may even fix the System Center issue you were having Phil, as that I was no longer able to manage my VMs on a Windows 7 box using 5nine Manager after the MOFCOMP command, but it too is working now.

    The only re-config I did on my guests was to change the boot firmware on each from "File bootmgfw.efi" to the system .vhdx, but otherwise no configuration required.

    I wonder if simply removing and re-adding the role would have corrected the Windows 10 issue to start out with? :-)

    Thanks,
    Jeff

    Hello Jeff,

    correctly, it solves the problem on the affected servers when remove and reinstall the Hyper-V-Role.

    Access the Windows 10 Hyper-V-Manager is still possible after that.

    Your question is entitled:

    Is enough of a remove and reinstall the Hyper-V-Role, to enable access on Windows 10 Hyper-V-Manager, without having to compile the MOF file?

    Greeting, John

    Friday, September 11, 2015 6:46 AM
  • Thanks for reporting back John! :-) Jeff
    Saturday, September 12, 2015 1:15 AM
  • This was the exact solution.  I have an HP ProLiant DL380 G5 running Server 2012 R2 with Hyper-V and I was unable to use the Hyper-V Manager in Windows 10 until I ran "MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof"
    • Proposed as answer by kentpo Wednesday, March 16, 2016 3:17 PM
    Wednesday, September 23, 2015 5:38 AM
  • (...) and then simply remove and re-install the Hyper-V role (...)

    I cannot do this, as I am running Hyper-V server. It is not possible to remove the Hyper-V role in this variant, if I recall correctly.

    Is there any other way to repair the damage?

    BTW, I am facing this problem in a HP 360 G7, but not in a non-branded Intel barebone server that sits right next to it. Both are running 2012R2 and living in the same network, so hardware is definitely a factor in this bug.

    Fernando

    Friday, September 25, 2015 12:06 PM
  • (...) and then simply remove and re-install the Hyper-V role (...)

    I cannot do this, as I am running Hyper-V server. It is not possible to remove the Hyper-V role in this variant, if I recall correctly.

    Is there any other way to repair the damage?

    BTW, I am facing this problem in a HP 360 G7, but not in a non-branded Intel barebone server that sits right next to it. Both are running 2012R2 and living in the same network, so hardware is definitely a factor in this bug.

    Fernando

    Have you tried re-compiling MOFs from elevated command prompt (or powershell)?

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    That's what fixed 2 hyper-v servers here, one was a Proliant ML350 Gen8, other was Proliant DL60 Gen9, both running 2012 R2 and up to date. No problems since when trying to manage them remotely from Windows 10 x64 Pro.


    • Edited by Kuba_L Friday, September 25, 2015 2:42 PM
    • Proposed as answer by kentpo Wednesday, March 16, 2016 3:17 PM
    Friday, September 25, 2015 2:41 PM
  • (...) and then simply remove and re-install the Hyper-V role (...)

    I cannot do this, as I am running Hyper-V server. It is not possible to remove the Hyper-V role in this variant, if I recall correctly.

    Is there any other way to repair the damage?

    BTW, I am facing this problem in a HP 360 G7, but not in a non-branded Intel barebone server that sits right next to it. Both are running 2012R2 and living in the same network, so hardware is definitely a factor in this bug.

    Fernando

    Have you tried re-compiling MOFs from elevated command prompt (or powershell)?

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    That's what fixed 2 hyper-v servers here, one was a Proliant ML350 Gen8, other was Proliant DL60 Gen9, both running 2012 R2 and up to date. No problems since when trying to manage them remotely from Windows 10 x64 Pro.


    Have you checked if you still can configure the firmware of Generation 2 VMs? Because executing this command has caused this for us. Fregi Ventum wrote that after using the command he had to reinstall the Hyper-V role only to be able to configure the firmware again.

    Monday, September 28, 2015 7:08 AM
  • beware if you run  “MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof” it does fix the issue but  afterwards  you will have issues with System center virtual  machine manage running  jobs on that particular host. Some things worked but  most reconfigurations  via VMM would fail  or behave as completed but changes never made. All seemed to be working  until I tried to  apply a logical switch configuration to the host. I rolled back the host  back to the  its configuration prior to a running the mofcom command and all is back to normal. Since I have several test hosts  I was able to replicate the identical issue on another Hyper-v 2012R2 host (just to rule out it was not the particular host). Though I have VMM there are certain functionalities that it does not have that are available in the native Hyper-v manager. All my test hosts are  on  Dell  servers (11th and 12th  generation PowerEdge)  so the issue is not isolated to HP servers. The windows 10 clients are running windows 10 enterprise ( new install rtm). removing the host and re-adding the host in VMM I did not try but could be a resolve to the issue of VMM no longer able to manage the host after the  running the  mof command but due to time constraints and needing the test host did not try this but will try at a latter time.

    Heya Phil,

    Is there any way that you know of to repair the damage caused by rebuilding the .mof if rolling back is not an optoin?

    Thanks,
    Jeff

    Jeff,

    I my case  I rolled back  by restoring the OS. I am  going to experiment  when I get a chance as I have an idea as to how to fix the issues caused by  rebuilding the mof.  My thoughts are to  remove the host from VMM, then remove the Hyper-V role from the host then re-add the role. Once that is completed re-add the Hyper-V host to VMM. I believe  that the  removal and re-add of the role and re-add to VMM will rebuild the missing entries that the mof rebuild caused (I am guessing the rebuild strips out all the entries that were created by VMM as well as the hyper-V role install). Not sure if this makes any differences ( it shouldn't ) but  my Hyper-v host are all in core mode. What I am not quite understanding is the cause of the issue in the first place when all works fine until one tries to manage with a Win 10 machine. This issue is with Win 10 we should not have to repair  our 2012-R2  Hyper-V host for an issue  introduced by the windows 10 Hyper-v manager which is suppose to be backward compatible with lower version hosts. Nor is this an issue  with just HP servers as all my servers are Dells. Its one thing to do this  for one Hyper-v host (in my case two in non-production) but no way  am I going to do this for 50+ host  in a production environment as it certainly not worth the benefit at the moment> do most of my work with the Hyper-v hosts via VMM but occasionally it is simpler for a minor task  or if I need to connect to the VM via the console in enhanced mode (something I have not been able to do via VMM) rather than via RDP or the non-enhanced console

    Saturday, October 03, 2015 7:13 AM
  • This issue I have seen even on an old 6 year old dell server just recently retired from production and running server 2012 Hyper-v. So does not seem to be hardware specific or even OS specific of an issue.

    So after some repeated  testing with Hyper-v servers, all managed by system center 2012 R2 virtual machine manager (latest RU and all servers with latest patches). All are deployed with same configuration including logical switches. running the following steps resolves the issue of not being able to add to windows 10 Hyper-v manager and resolves the issues caused by running the   MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof command to fix that issue

    below is the order to proceed that I successfully used after some trial and errors

    Step 1 Migrate all machines off of the Hyper-V host (if you don't , even if turned off the VMs , you will end up having to remove and reinstall each of the network adapter on each of the VMs on the host)

    Step 2 remove the Hyper-v  host from VMM (make sure the job completes before going to next step)

    Step 3 Launch PowerShell or command prompt with administrative right (does not matter which one you use)

              execute the following command MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    Step 4 remove the Hyper-v role (will require a reboot)

    Step 5 install the hyper-v role (will require a reboot). Be careful to select the same Path you had before for the VMs and VHDs

    Step 6 add the Hyper-V host to VMM (make sure job completes and ensure  that the status of the host shows no issues. If it does resolve the issues before  continuing to next step. If you see WMI error in status, stop and restart the system center agent on the hyper-V host then refresh the host. If still not clear of issues reboot the hyper-v host . If still not without issues you may need to remove the VMM agent and have VMM reinstall the agent (repair)

    Step 7 access the NIC teaming applet via server manager, delete the NIC team (s) created by VMM logical switch deployment (does not get removed when you remove the host from VMM nor when removing the hyper-v role. You will need to remove the NIC team so that you can recreate the logical switch, if you don't Logical switch deployment will fail. These have to be redeployed for VMM to see the Logical switch as being installed on the host.

    Step 8 From VMM  redeploy the Logical switch

    Step 9 Migrate your VMs back to the host

    You now will be able to add the host to the windows 10 Hyper-v manager, VMM will work properly and the Gen 2 firmware issue will also be resolved (reinstall of Hyper-V role resolves that)

    My concern is  we don't know what causes this in the first place and the issue may be reintroduced. This might work  if you just have a few hosts to fix but is unrealistic  in a production environment, especially a large one. I think the issue is with windows 10 rather than the Hyper-V hosts and hopefully a hotfix will be issued to resolve this



    • Edited by Phil_Jehl Monday, October 05, 2015 6:35 AM
    Sunday, October 04, 2015 11:23 PM
  • I just wanted to note that I have the same issues with a weird exception. My 2012 R2 Hyper-V hosts that were built this year with Datacentre are fine (13th Gen Dell servers), but my 2012 R2 Hyper-V hosts that were built last year with 2012 R2 Standard (also 13th Gen Dell servers) cannot be managed from a Hyper-V console on a Windows 10 Enterprise 32, or 64-bit client. (Same "Msvm_RegisteredProfile does not exist in the root/interop namespace" error as the original Post.) All of my hosts are patched to the same levels.

    I also wanted to note that I have a Fast Ring windows 10 machine on 10565 which experiences the issue, so it hasn't been resolved in later builds.

    The amount of work needed to get the hosts running properly is not worth the effort for me as I have some Windows 8.1 management clients, but it certainly looks as though a hotfix needs to be made for this issue as more clients get upgraded to Windows10.

    Friday, October 16, 2015 7:43 PM
  • There has been an issue identified in managing Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V from Windows.  It was reported in the Failover Clustering that Microsoft has identified an issue and they expect to have a fix soon.

    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Friday, October 16, 2015 9:37 PM
  • Thanks for the Update Tim. I also wanted to add that my hosts are all Datacenter 2012R2 in reference to TheWalker1's post
    Friday, October 23, 2015 1:15 AM
  • This fixed all of my HP hosts that Hyper-V Manager (Windows 10) had issues with.

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    Thanks Brian

    Wednesday, November 11, 2015 1:26 AM
  • I found this forum while looking for a fix for the same problem.  A quick fix that works, is to add your VMHost(s) to the host file.  It will fix the problem and doesn't break anything else.
    Wednesday, November 11, 2015 8:26 PM
  • If you're using SCVMM your virtual switches will be lost. In that case don't apply this workaround!!!
    Thursday, December 31, 2015 12:14 PM
  • Hi,

    W10 build 10586.

    Have the same Hyper-V Manager popup box as in the initial post...

    Getting it when try to add Server 2008 R2 and 2012 R2 with Hyper-V roles to the console on fresh install of W10 Pro.

    Is there some official patch. Don't want to play with workarounds.

    Thx.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Thursday, February 18, 2016 3:32 PM
  • I've got this error message trying to connect to one of my HyperV servers, installed on HP server. This helped

    You need to start CMD as Administrator on server you trying to connect to and run

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    After this I could connect to my server from my Windows 10 HyperV console

    • Proposed as answer by pob579 Tuesday, May 24, 2016 5:05 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Mako-Wish Tuesday, March 07, 2017 4:22 PM
    Friday, May 20, 2016 3:10 AM
  • Illya,

    I tried to connect from my W10 machine to freshly mounted W10 with Hyper-V role. When tried to add Hyper-V

    "host" (another W10) I got the error. So run the command provided.

    Here is the result:

    Microsoft Windows [Version 10.0.10586]
    (c) 2015 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
    C:\WINDOWS\system32>MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof
    Microsoft (R) MOF Compiler Version 10.0.10586.0
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp. 1997-2006. All rights reserved.
    File 'C:\WINDOWS\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof' not found!

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>

    I will try the command on one of production Hyper-V server that is less critical.

    Thanks.


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016 4:06 PM
  • Illya,

    simply a m a z i n g     :)

    Works great for Server 2012 R2, will add multiple 2008R2.

    If you have an idea how to add W10 with Hyper-V role will be good.

    Thanks (spasibo).


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016 5:05 PM
  • the command provided in upper post:

    MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    instantly allowed to add 2012 servers to Hyper-V manager on W10 machine.

    However, it shows file not found (est introuvable) on servers 2008 R2(they running French OS) and the same on Windows 10 machine with Hyper-V role installed. Any clue were the file is located on 2008 servers?

    From Server 2008 R2 Standard:

    C:\>MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof
    Compilateur MOF Microsoft (R) - Version 6.1.7600.16385
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp. 1997-2006. Tous droits réservés.
    Le fichier 'C:\Windows\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof' est introuvable.

    C:\>

    From Windows 10 with Hyper-V role installed:

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>MOFCOMP %SYSTEMROOT%\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof
    Microsoft (R) MOF Compiler Version 10.0.10586.0
    Copyright (c) Microsoft Corp. 1997-2006. All rights reserved.
    File 'C:\WINDOWS\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof' not found!

    C:\WINDOWS\system32>


    --- When you hit a wrong note its the next note that makes it good or bad. --- Miles Davis

    Tuesday, May 24, 2016 5:28 PM
  • There has been an issue identified in managing Windows Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V from Windows.  It was reported in the Failover Clustering that Microsoft has identified an issue and they expect to have a fix soon.

    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Almost 1 year later.  I still see no update for windows 10 (even the anniversary edition) to fix this issue.

    With HV Core and SCVMM this "workround" is far more work then needed.


    jeff ferguson

    Tuesday, September 06, 2016 5:48 PM
  • Yes, a patch was released some time ago.

    What issue are you seeing?  You might want to open a new post rather that posting to a stream that was last active a year ago.


    . : | : . : | : . tim

    Tuesday, September 06, 2016 7:59 PM
  • Absolutely Amazing!  Months of problems fixed with a single line! Well done Brian!!!!
    Tuesday, September 06, 2016 9:28 PM
  • Can you point me that patch, please?
    Friday, September 16, 2016 3:30 PM
  • There is no way to manage Server 2012 R2 Hyper-V from either Windows Server 2016 or Windows 10 LTSB 2016

    Each gives the same error:

    Obviously all the Hyper-V role removal & re-add as suggested by Phil_Jehl

    after the "solution" buggered other things!:

    "...it does fix the issue but  afterwards  you will have issues with System center virtual  machine manage running  jobs on that particular host. Some things worked but  most reconfigurations  via VMM would fail  or behave as completed but changes never made..."

    is ABSOLUTELY NOT A SOLUTION for PRODUCTION environment (only testing environment would be OK for these drastic actions)





    • Edited by scerazy Wednesday, October 05, 2016 10:14 AM
    Monday, September 26, 2016 11:44 AM
  • I ran into this issue as well. I have HP servers and I applied the latest 2016 SPP from HP. It updated the HP WBEM components and broke my Hyper-V MMC from my Windows 10 1607 client. I applied the suggested MOF file re-registration and that immediately fixed my Hyper-V management console from my PC, but broke VMM switches.

    The fix is to simply uninstall VMM agent from the Hyper-V host(s) (Programs and Features - Uninstall), refresh the Cluster in VMM (if applicable), then the Hosts itself in the VMM Console. If you look at the host properties in VMM you should then see a WinRM ERROR, now re-install VMM Agent from the original media/ISO. (Done locally on the Hyper-V server in question). Once re-installed go back to VMM and refresh the cluster (if applicable) and then the host, you should now have an "Attention", rather than an "ERROR", and will need to do a "Repair All" of the Hyper-V host to update the VMM agent software. Once software is updated, reboot the Hyper-V host. Repeat with each Hyper-V host that has the issue. If you install the agent software and still see any issues with Performance Counters in the host properties, you just need a Hyper-V hosts reboot and then another refresh of the host in VMM.

    This procedure has worked for me numerous times with not only HP software but other 3rd party software that messes with WMI. VMM is very sensitive to WMI changes.

     


    Sean

    • Proposed as answer by Hollisorama Tuesday, March 07, 2017 3:51 PM
    Tuesday, November 15, 2016 12:52 AM
  • Hi,

    great  ! this worked for us

    Thursday, December 22, 2016 3:04 PM
  • hey,

    we had "connection like" errors on some clients from different subnets.

    the mofcomp command helps us to get a working connection with hyper-v manager again!

    GREAT :-)

    Tuesday, January 31, 2017 10:34 AM
  • So, I completely forgot about this and updated my baseline HP baseline to 2016.10.0.  Suddenly I could no longer manage my Hyper-V from Windows 10 again. :)

    This time, rather than doing the destructive MOFCOMP method, I simply removed and re-added the Hyper-V role.  As I stated previously, I only had to gather the settings for Hyper-V itself and all was good.  I did have to re-select my virtual switches on each of my guests, but that wasn't a big deal.  Take note of those as well. :D

    In short, simply removing and re-adding the Hyper-V role corrects this problem, assuming you're not running the Hyper-V server version that is.
    Thursday, March 02, 2017 5:40 PM
  • Hi Fregi,

    Unfortunately, while removing and reinstalling the Hyper-V role will correct the issue, this would be very disruptive on a production server. Not to mention time-consuming when a G7 can take 10+ minutes for a restart. I have now run into the issue five times, and reinstalling the namespace with

    MOFCOMP C:\Windows\System32\WindowsVirtualization.V2.mof

    Is much faster, less disruptive, far simpler, and it does the job.

    Eric

    Thursday, March 02, 2017 5:46 PM
  • Mako,

    Yours are indeed valid points.  It is a great short-term fix which does not require down-time, assuming that the issues it introduces do not cause downtime themselves.  The fact remains that the MOFCOMP solution does have a negative impact the Hyper-V installation on the hypervisor, and at some point may well need to be addressed.

    I strongly recommend that upon the first available outage window, 30 minutes should be taken to repair the damage by a removal and re-installation of the role (if not using the Windows Hyper-V server stand-alone product).  After all, you can still manage the VMs on the host via its console until such a time that the role can be removed and re-added.

    It is important that the cost of the MOFCOMP solution is understood by any who might choose to employ it, and that a resolution to the damage / alternate fix for the underlying cause is also documented within this thread, lest anyone makes the choice ill-informed.

    Friday, March 03, 2017 5:41 PM
  • This worked perfectly and dealt with both issues without having to remove/reinstall the Hyper-V role.  This occurred for me on Windows Server 2016 Core.

    Thanks Sean.


    • Edited by Hollisorama Tuesday, March 07, 2017 3:52 PM
    Tuesday, March 07, 2017 3:52 PM