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Recurring Meetings - Multiple resources RRS feed

  • Question

  • Have MS Project 2010 std.  Have set up a 1 hour recurring meeting which will last more than 1 year.  Have assigned 25 resources to the meeting.  Issue: Currently Project wants to split the 1 hour among the 25 resources when in fact they will be allocated each a full hour to attend.  I don't want it to change the 'total work' for individual task to go to 25 hours, when the task is really 1 hour.

    Friday, November 4, 2011 7:27 PM

Answers

  • GEM,

    I agree with your assessment in that the meetings could be tracked via other means.  However, IMHO, the purpose of the tool (in this case MS Project) is to schedule tasks & resources as well as a high level cost forecasting and planning tool.  With 25 person-hours per meeting, even if it was bi-weekly, calculates out to 650 hours of effort in a year.  That is a considerable sum even at a modest pay or billable rate.  Entering recurring tasks also allows the PM or scheduler to see where resource conflicts exist between the meetings and tasking. 

    Some organizations like seeing the effects of meetings on a schedule and some do not.  My litmus test usually consists of two questions: "Will it add value to the information we already have?" and "What does the client want?"


    Gregg D. Richie, PMP, MCTS; Author, Microsoft Project 2010, Microsoft Official Academic Course Series
    • Marked as answer by thundergray1 Tuesday, November 8, 2011 3:42 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 11:46 PM

All replies

  • thundergray1 --

    The calculation you see is correct.  What Microsoft Project 2010 is trying to demonstrate is that you are expending 25 "man hours" on each of those meetings.  This means that the 25 hours of Work that the software calculates for the meeting is absolutely correct, and I would recommend that you do NOT attempt to change it.

    The 1 hour to which you refer is the Duration of the meeting.  The meeting lasts for a duration of 1 hour, but there are 25 man hours of Work expended among all of the people who attend the meeting.  This explains the reality of why meetings are so expensive for companies to hold, and why purposeless meetings cost a company a lot of wasted time and money.  Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Friday, November 4, 2011 7:54 PM
    Moderator
  • What Dale said is correct - my question is:  Why are you tracking this in a schedule sofware tool?  Is this what your leadership wants?  You might want to offer an alternative.

    Those meetings can be tracked in Outlook or some other calendar SW.  Project is designed to track discrete tasks that define and impact the final end date of the project.  My experience is that recurring meetings don't do that - soooo... why track them in Project?  Put them in a calendar and you won't clutter up your schedule.

    Not a criticism - just an observation.

     

    GEM

    Friday, November 4, 2011 8:21 PM
  • GEM,

    I agree with your assessment in that the meetings could be tracked via other means.  However, IMHO, the purpose of the tool (in this case MS Project) is to schedule tasks & resources as well as a high level cost forecasting and planning tool.  With 25 person-hours per meeting, even if it was bi-weekly, calculates out to 650 hours of effort in a year.  That is a considerable sum even at a modest pay or billable rate.  Entering recurring tasks also allows the PM or scheduler to see where resource conflicts exist between the meetings and tasking. 

    Some organizations like seeing the effects of meetings on a schedule and some do not.  My litmus test usually consists of two questions: "Will it add value to the information we already have?" and "What does the client want?"


    Gregg D. Richie, PMP, MCTS; Author, Microsoft Project 2010, Microsoft Official Academic Course Series
    • Marked as answer by thundergray1 Tuesday, November 8, 2011 3:42 PM
    Friday, November 4, 2011 11:46 PM