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Restoring a folder to an alternate location preserving folder permissions RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello everyone,

    I've recently came across a situation of data migration where simply moving the data around or using a file copy software was not an option. That scratched, the next obvious option was to use the backed up data using DPM by restoring it to the alternate locations.

    Surprisingly enough I learned that I could not restore a folder without all the "trash" (full path name) on the folder's back. It's bad, it takes twice as time to do what is needed, but I can live with that.

    What I've learned next, is why I need some sort of technical explanation. I Have the following tree aspect.

     \watermelon (with permissions water and round)

          \seed (with permissions oblique and light)

              \atom (with permissions electron and proton)

    When I restored 'atom' using the - restore to an alternate location and preserve restore point security settings to 'atom', the folder 'atom', down all the path restored along, kept it's permissions (electron and proton).

    Next I moved it to watermelon and so, the tree changed to

    \watermelon

         \atom 

    \atom

             \watermelon (DPM restore created folder)

         \seed

             

    When I checked, the 'atom' folder just under watermelon changed to "water and round".

    When I restored  'atom' using the - restore to an alternate location and preserve restore point security settings to 'watermelon', the folder 'atom', down all the path restored along, kept it's permissions (electron and proton).

    Next I moved it to watermelon and so, the tree changed to

    \watermelon

         \watermelon (DPM restore created folder)

          \atom

         \seed

              \atom

    When I checked, the 'atom' folder just under watermelon kept its permissions of "electron and proton".

    Can someone explain me in technical talk, this is, what is happening under the hood, why this happens?

    Much appreciated!







    • Edited by evolvtyon Wednesday, March 28, 2012 7:35 PM
    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 6:00 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    If you CUT and PASTE the restored data to remove the prepended DPM path, then ntfs permissions are preserved.  If you copy the files, then permissions get inherited from the parent folder.   That is the way NTFS permissions work.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    • Marked as answer by evolvtyon Monday, February 18, 2013 7:28 PM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 10:41 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Anyone can shed some light on this? What I wrote before is understandable ?

    Thanks

    Thursday, March 29, 2012 4:50 PM
  • I will give away cookies for an answer!
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 9:12 PM
  • Hi,

    If you CUT and PASTE the restored data to remove the prepended DPM path, then ntfs permissions are preserved.  If you copy the files, then permissions get inherited from the parent folder.   That is the way NTFS permissions work.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    • Marked as answer by evolvtyon Monday, February 18, 2013 7:28 PM
    Wednesday, December 19, 2012 10:41 PM
    Moderator