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How to legally run XP Mode VM with Windows 10 host. RRS feed

  • Question

  • Is it legal to run a windows 10 host and purchase a windows 7 pro license then run xp mode vm?

    Friday, September 1, 2017 3:47 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    XP Mode was introduced for Windows 7 (Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate) users as a way to run software designed for XP in Windows 7. Since Wiindows 8 or 10 does not support XP Mode, we'll need to extract the virtual hard drive included in XP Mode and run it as a virtual machine. Here's reference that may be helpful for you :

    https://www.download3k.com/articles/How-to-add-an-XP-Mode-Virtual-Machine-to-Windows-10-or-8-using-Hyper-V-00770

    Please Note: Since the website isn’t hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft doesn’t guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    In addition, for XP VM, you should purchase the required licenses to go with your scenario.

    If your devices are accessing a Windows desktop OS VM from a server, then they need to be covered with either Windows SA or Windows VDA. This info can be found via Microsoft here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Licensing/product-licensing/windows10.aspx


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    The XP VM is licensed to the Windows 7 host.  It is not a separate license that can be transferred to another host.
    • Marked as answer by BillDuser Tuesday, September 5, 2017 8:41 PM
    Tuesday, September 5, 2017 6:09 PM

All replies

  • If you run Windows 7 in a VM, and then a child VM with XP Mode.  You can
    stack them like that.  Not the best performance though.
     
    XP Mode isn't licensed to run directly under Windows 10.
     
     
    Friday, September 1, 2017 4:09 PM
  • Hi,

     

    XP Mode was introduced for Windows 7 (Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate) users as a way to run software designed for XP in Windows 7. Since Wiindows 8 or 10 does not support XP Mode, we'll need to extract the virtual hard drive included in XP Mode and run it as a virtual machine. Here's reference that may be helpful for you :

    https://www.download3k.com/articles/How-to-add-an-XP-Mode-Virtual-Machine-to-Windows-10-or-8-using-Hyper-V-00770

    Please Note: Since the website isn’t hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft doesn’t guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    In addition, for XP VM, you should purchase the required licenses to go with your scenario.

    If your devices are accessing a Windows desktop OS VM from a server, then they need to be covered with either Windows SA or Windows VDA. This info can be found via Microsoft here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Licensing/product-licensing/windows10.aspx


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, September 4, 2017 6:16 AM
  • If I understand correctly, even though I purchase a valid Windows 7 Pro license it is illegal to then run the XP VM under Windows 10 without running the Windows 7 VM. This make no sense since I would have a legal Windows 7 license to allow use of the XP VM.

    Tuesday, September 5, 2017 4:13 PM
  • You may think it doesn't make sense, but the XP VM is licensed to the Windows 7 host.  It is not a separate license that can be transferred to another host.
    Tuesday, September 5, 2017 6:05 PM
  • Hi,

     

    XP Mode was introduced for Windows 7 (Professional, Enterprise, or Ultimate) users as a way to run software designed for XP in Windows 7. Since Wiindows 8 or 10 does not support XP Mode, we'll need to extract the virtual hard drive included in XP Mode and run it as a virtual machine. Here's reference that may be helpful for you :

    https://www.download3k.com/articles/How-to-add-an-XP-Mode-Virtual-Machine-to-Windows-10-or-8-using-Hyper-V-00770

    Please Note: Since the website isn’t hosted by Microsoft, the link may change without notice. Microsoft doesn’t guarantee the accuracy of this information.

    In addition, for XP VM, you should purchase the required licenses to go with your scenario.

    If your devices are accessing a Windows desktop OS VM from a server, then they need to be covered with either Windows SA or Windows VDA. This info can be found via Microsoft here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/Licensing/product-licensing/windows10.aspx


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    The XP VM is licensed to the Windows 7 host.  It is not a separate license that can be transferred to another host.
    • Marked as answer by BillDuser Tuesday, September 5, 2017 8:41 PM
    Tuesday, September 5, 2017 6:09 PM
  • Like RTFM said, the XP Mode license is tied to the host (Windows 7 Pro+)
    only, it's not a normal Windows XP License, nor is it a normal XP
    install.
     
     
     
    Tuesday, September 5, 2017 9:56 PM
  • This resurrects numerous old complications that plague renegade hacker-types, whenever they try to incorporate creative outside-the-box thinking to Virtual Machines. I labored forever, unsuccessfully attempting to get an old Win XP moved as a VM in order to run ancient but vital business programs which could not be installed on later OS. I would, seemingly randomly, get one to work, then fail with no rhyme nor reason. Finally, I learned about the OEM loaded into typical office computers, and how its license is tied inextricably to that physical machine; one can create a VM, and likely get it to work on that same machine, but never onto another. Then, like magic, I got one to work consistently - lo and behold, it was because that used laptop had an original fully licensed XP install, and so the XP OS was not bound to the physical machine in the same way. It could be passed onto an entirely new one, running Win 7, Linux, or whatever OS had a VM application in place, and happily run no problem.

    Of course, I have tried to reserve this strategy for isolated programs that need no internet, so I can avoid risks from intrusion as well as inadvertent "updates" which might either introduce unwanted changes, alerts regarding the program's obsolescence, or complications should Microsoft get some feedback about an extra copy of a Win XP being run without another license.

    My personal pinnacle of sophistication was creating a VM XP running my desired programs, on a Win 7 Pro machine, accessed by remote desktop from both Win 7 and other XP computers on a secured closed network, all working long enough to last until the close of our small business. To this day I resent the manner in which MS and the software providers colluded to enforce usury renewal and 'support' rates of thousands of dollars every two or three years, while the marketplace drove costs vastly lower, for gaming programs that were obviously much more advanced, but by selling into the millions, could go for $50-200. I still have to preserve a viable copy of the two business programs, for the seven years during which any audit might occur, a situation that thousands of other small closed businesses must face - and considering out-of-pocket expenses to update software for seven years in this unlikely eventuality is the final insult we would bear, without workarounds like mine.

    Thursday, March 8, 2018 7:08 PM