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Show duration according to the task calendar instead of standard from options menu RRS feed

  • Question

  • How can you in the same view show duration of task according to their task calendar (i.e weekend or 24H) instead of the default settings in calendar options (e.g. 8 hours per day, 5 days a week, 20 days a month etc.)?

    Perhaps if there is an option to show elapsed days in stead of working days or similar?

    example.

    A task with a 24 hour calendar is shown in the Gantt Chart view to have a duration of 1,5 days which to people unfamiliar to MPP would be quite confusing.


    Friday, March 23, 2012 12:48 PM

Answers

  • Kasper,

    Can you explain what you mean by "show duration of a task according to their task calendar..."?  It appears you are aware of the fact that duration is different than elapsed time.  Project adheres to the true definition of duration, which is the "number of work periods required to complete a task or project." 

    I had a client that requested something similar and here was my solution:

    Create a custom calculated duration field and call it "Actual Time" or whatever works.  In the formula dialog box enter the following formula: ([Finish]-[Start])*60*8.  This will calculate the actual number of days from the planned start to the planned finish and will calculate eplapsed time (weekends, non-working periods).

    Hope this helps.


    Gregg D. Richie, PMP, MCTS; Author, Microsoft Project 2010, Microsoft Official Academic Course Series

    Friday, March 23, 2012 3:25 PM
  • Kasoer,

    The only way I know to do that is to use an extra duration field (e.g. Duration1) customized with a formula. For example, if you only need to worry about task calendars of "none" and "24 hours", you could use the following forumla:

    IIf([Task Calendar]="None",[Duration],[Duration]/24)

    The formula would be a little more complex if you had additional customized task calendars (e.g. 4 hours per day, 5 days a week)

    Just a side comment: There are many other things about Project that might be confusing to someone unfamiliar with the application. No knowledge can be dangerous but sometimes inadequate knowledge can be even more dangerous. If your users are going to use or even view Project, make sure they have sufficient knowledge to understand what they are doing/viewing. Life will just be a whole lot easier.

    John


    Friday, March 23, 2012 3:32 PM

All replies

  • Hello Kasper,

    Pls ignore the previous two posts deleted. What is your purpose ? Overriding "hours per day" calculation ?

    Regards.

    Friday, March 23, 2012 3:25 PM
  • Kasper,

    Can you explain what you mean by "show duration of a task according to their task calendar..."?  It appears you are aware of the fact that duration is different than elapsed time.  Project adheres to the true definition of duration, which is the "number of work periods required to complete a task or project." 

    I had a client that requested something similar and here was my solution:

    Create a custom calculated duration field and call it "Actual Time" or whatever works.  In the formula dialog box enter the following formula: ([Finish]-[Start])*60*8.  This will calculate the actual number of days from the planned start to the planned finish and will calculate eplapsed time (weekends, non-working periods).

    Hope this helps.


    Gregg D. Richie, PMP, MCTS; Author, Microsoft Project 2010, Microsoft Official Academic Course Series

    Friday, March 23, 2012 3:25 PM
  • Kasoer,

    The only way I know to do that is to use an extra duration field (e.g. Duration1) customized with a formula. For example, if you only need to worry about task calendars of "none" and "24 hours", you could use the following forumla:

    IIf([Task Calendar]="None",[Duration],[Duration]/24)

    The formula would be a little more complex if you had additional customized task calendars (e.g. 4 hours per day, 5 days a week)

    Just a side comment: There are many other things about Project that might be confusing to someone unfamiliar with the application. No knowledge can be dangerous but sometimes inadequate knowledge can be even more dangerous. If your users are going to use or even view Project, make sure they have sufficient knowledge to understand what they are doing/viewing. Life will just be a whole lot easier.

    John


    Friday, March 23, 2012 3:32 PM