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Combining User and Computer Settings into a single GPO - Performance Considerations?

    Question

  • Hi

    After having a chat with some of my colleagues, we got to discussing combining GPOs with user and computer settings into a single policy to cut down on the total number of GPOS.

    We were trying to find some official documentation on performance impact of doing this, does anyone have any information on that topic? Most of the information around GPO performance I have found has been the usual stuff, don't have too many, don't have too many WMI filters etc but not really much around the impact of combining user and computer settings vs separate user and computer policies.

    Thanks

    Jonathan

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015 10:05 AM

Answers

  • I think that is more of a management issue that a performance issue. Unless you have loopback enabled, computers will not look at user configurations. Users will never look at computer configurations. So I don't see a real performance impact by combining them.

    If my answer helped you, check out my blog: Deploy Happiness

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015 12:00 PM
  • > I think that is more of a management issue that a performance issue.
    > Unless you have loopback enabled, computers will not look at user
    > configurations. Users will never look at computer configurations. So I
    > don't see a real performance impact by combining them.
     
    Even with loopback enabled, computers ignore user settings. Loopback
    only changes the search scope for user GPOs.
     
    In fact, it mostly is a simple matter of organization... It prevents
    accidental application of settings in a "forgotten" policy.
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    Wednesday, April 22, 2015 3:41 PM
  • Hi Jonathan,

    I would agree that you combine the computer setting and user setting in one GPO would not improve the performance.

    Only if you reduce the group policy settings, you might has a better performance.

    Hereby you can check the below link for more details about group policy design and best practice:

    http://windowsitpro.com/group-policy/group-policy-design-best-practices

    Best Regards,


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, April 23, 2015 9:47 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • I think that is more of a management issue that a performance issue. Unless you have loopback enabled, computers will not look at user configurations. Users will never look at computer configurations. So I don't see a real performance impact by combining them.

    If my answer helped you, check out my blog: Deploy Happiness

    Wednesday, April 22, 2015 12:00 PM
  • > I think that is more of a management issue that a performance issue.
    > Unless you have loopback enabled, computers will not look at user
    > configurations. Users will never look at computer configurations. So I
    > don't see a real performance impact by combining them.
     
    Even with loopback enabled, computers ignore user settings. Loopback
    only changes the search scope for user GPOs.
     
    In fact, it mostly is a simple matter of organization... It prevents
    accidental application of settings in a "forgotten" policy.
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    Wednesday, April 22, 2015 3:41 PM
  • Hi Jonathan,

    I would agree that you combine the computer setting and user setting in one GPO would not improve the performance.

    Only if you reduce the group policy settings, you might has a better performance.

    Hereby you can check the below link for more details about group policy design and best practice:

    http://windowsitpro.com/group-policy/group-policy-design-best-practices

    Best Regards,


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Thursday, April 23, 2015 9:47 AM
    Moderator