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Helping understanding System State vs Volumes RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi...

    I'm hoping that someone can help explain System States, Bare Metal Recovery, and individual volumes. I'm wondering if I'm currently doing "over kill" when backing up some of my servers. 

    If I'm doing a System State backup and a Bare Metal Recovery on a server, do I need to do a full backup of all files and folders on drive C:\ as well or should I only be backing up files and folders on drive C:\ that contain important data and NOT operating system files and folders? I'm thinking that because I'm doing a System State and a Bare Metal Recovery, that I only need to do the important data on Drive C:\ to help conserve on the the amount of physical storage it takes to back everything up. 

    In case it helps, I'm backing up to disk and not tape. I need to ensure when backing up that I can do a full disaster recovery and also be able to restore individual files / folders when the need arises. 

    Thanks in advance! :) 


    Thanks... Frank

    Monday, January 21, 2013 5:20 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    BMR will backup all files on the volumes determined to be critical which of course is C: - but the question is how often are you doing the BMR backup.  If the user data on C: that is important changes more frequently than the BMR backups, then yes, you probably want to select them separately in another PG. 


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 1:45 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    BMR will backup all files on the volumes determined to be critical which of course is C: - but the question is how often are you doing the BMR backup.  If the user data on C: that is important changes more frequently than the BMR backups, then yes, you probably want to select them separately in another PG. 


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Mike...

    Basically, my servers are being backed up once a night. During each backup... BMR, System State, and C:\ is being backed up. I really dont need these particular servers being backed up more than that. 

    If I just did a BMR nightly on these servers, would I be killing two birds with one stone?? Another words, with just the BMR backup, could I restore the server if there was a total disaster AND if just a few files or folders got deleted / corrupt, I could just restore those individual files and folders without having to do a complete disaster recovery??

    Thanks for your reply and I look forward to your next one


    Thanks... Frank

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 1:54 AM
  • Hi,

    OK, from a recovery perspective, it's definitely easier to recovery individual files / folders from C:\ protection than from BMR.  To do item level from BMR you would need to restore the entire BMR backup to a folder on a Windows 2008 server (which could be the DPM server), then mount the .VHD in Windows disk management and copy the desired data out of it can copy back to the production server.  As usual, the data copied from one NTFS volume to another gets NTFS permissions inherited (unless you use robocopy), so if you have a lot of granular NTFS permissions, then DPM restore from C:\ protection is the better idea.  You could probably reduce the BMR backups from daily to something less if they are not DC's, and you are protecting user data separately.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 2:09 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    OK, from a recovery perspective, it's definitely easier to recovery individual files / folders from C:\ protection than from BMR.  To do item level from BMR you would need to restore the entire BMR backup to a folder on a Windows 2008 server (which could be the DPM server), then mount the .VHD in Windows disk management and copy the desired data out of it can copy back to the production server.  As usual, the data copied from one NTFS volume to another gets NTFS permissions inherited (unless you use robocopy), so if you have a lot of granular NTFS permissions, then DPM restore from C:\ protection is the better idea.  You could probably reduce the BMR backups from daily to something less if they are not DC's, and you are protecting user data separately.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Would I be "ok" if I limited my Drive C:\ backup to just data folders rather than also backing up all the operating system files too? Since I'm also doing a BMR, operating system files are being backed up in that. I cant see needing operating system files and program files unless a disaster recovery is needed anyway. Or am I forgetting about something?

    Thanks... Frank

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 2:14 AM
  • Hi,

    Absolutly, I would not include any OS files - just user files or other files that you believe might need to recovered individually outside of a full BMR restore. 


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.


    Tuesday, January 22, 2013 3:32 AM
    Moderator