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Fix apps that are blurry RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    Has anybody found a real root cause of the error with blurry apps? Why this is happening on Windows 10 only? Some new fancy feature in Win10 makes this possible?

    Is it expected to get fixed by GPU drivers, display drivers, or some other way?


    Petri

    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 10:59 AM

All replies

  • Hi Petri X,

    I'm a software developer (self-employed).

    If you have a high-resolution monitor (e.g. 4K) and use it with high-DPI (e.g. over 96:100%), some applications look blurry, because they are not DPI-aware. (A DPI-aware software looks clear and sharp.)

    But you can make a blurry application clear, by [Change high DPI settings].

    (1) right-click .exe file of a blurry application, or right-click its shortcut icon.

    (2) in Properties, [Compatibility] tab > [Change high DPI settings]
         

    (3) check two check boxes > [OK]
         

    (4) finally [Sign out] > [Sign in] of Windows

    Regards,

    Ashidacchi -- https://ssl01.rocketnet.jp/hokusosha.com/default.html


    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 1:06 PM
  • Hey Ashidacchi,

    Thank you for sharing this. But do you know what is the different on previous versions of the Windows and W10? I believe nobody have the problem with e.g. W7. Is the DPI-scaling the new stuff arrived with W10?

    Also when you describe the 4k resolution, that is still only a dream =) I have very standard 1920x1080 screens. This is the main display on the laptop, but also on the extended screens.

    Do you know how to check which applications are DPI-aware? And is this really so, that only applications can fix the issue?

    The text you can see on the latest window: "A program migth look blurry if the DPI for your main display changes after you sign in to Windows." But this is not the case, I do not swich the screens after I have done the sign in to Windows.


    Petri

    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 5:36 PM
  • Windows 10 tries to do more with DPI scaling than previous version, but this does not always work..
    A program that is DPI aware should declare in its manifest: open the .exe in any text editor and search for "manifest".
    f.e. notepad.exe contains:
    <application xmlns="urn:schemas-microsoft-com:asm.v3">
        <windowsSettings>
            <dpiAwareness xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/SMI/2016/WindowsSettings">PerMonitorV2</dpiAwareness>
        </windowsSettings>
    </application>
    There was also an older settings called simply dpiAware.

    In ProcessExlorer you can add the column "DPI Awareness"  to list the setting for running processes
    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 6:00 PM
  • Hi Petri X,

    As EckiS mentioned, you can know whether an app. is DPI-aware by opening "*.exe" file in text editor.
    We describe in "app.manifest" file (in short, make it UnCommented) like this.
    If <application xmlns=...> ... </application> is commented, or this description is not found in *.exe file, it is not DPI-aware. (and also Form needs to be "AutoScaleMode = DPI").

     
    Handling DPI is somewhat different between versions of Windows 10.
    (1) Which version do you have? 
    (2) What is your DPI scaling (100%, 125%, etc.)?

    Regards,

    Ashidacchi -- https://ssl01.rocketnet.jp/hokusosha.com/default.html


    • Edited by Ashidacchi Tuesday, February 12, 2019 10:39 PM
    Tuesday, February 12, 2019 10:34 PM
  • Hey Ashidacchi,

    Thank you for sharing this. But do you know what is the different on previous versions of the Windows and W10? I believe nobody have the problem with e.g. W7. Is the DPI-scaling the new stuff arrived with W10?

    Petri

    Hi Petri X,

    To provide an answer is difficult with my poor English. 

    DPI-aware (Dpi conscious) is a recent matter.  About 20 years ago, we were not conscious about DPI.  Most monitors used CRT (analog), instead of LCD (digital).  Sharpness or blur depends on (mostly) resolution of a CRT monitor or quality of its magneto-optic circuit.

    On the other hand, a LCD monitor has a digital panel, i.e. it shows characters or images dot by dot. And now, we have LCD monitors which resolution is over 1920 x 1080.  When a software is running on a small display (such as 13", 14"...), we can hardly read characters, so we have to think about DPI (100:100%, 120:125%...)

    Time goes by.  Windows 7 is fading, and Window 10 flourishes.  In Windows 7 age, high-resolution monitors were rare, but now, even a smaller screen is high-resolution. 

    That's all I can say.

    Regards,



        






     

    Ashidacchi -- https://ssl01.rocketnet.jp/hokusosha.com/default.html

    Tuesday, February 19, 2019 7:20 AM