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Exporting Data and Importing Data RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a SCDPM 2012R2 install with an ISCSI connection to a NAS for the Data Store. The NAS has 5TB of DPM data from an older version that was never properly imported. I would like to remove all of this old data from the disk but the DPM console cannot see it, and I cannot see it in file explorer. When I go into Disk manager I see nearly 100 partitions which have no description that would allow me to identify the old data from the current. My questions are:

    • Is there an easy way for me to remove the old data and reclaim that space for my current DPM install
    • If there is not I would like to export the current data, rebuild the volume on the nas and server it back up to DPM, then import the data and continue my backups... Is this possible? I do not see an area in DPM to export the protected data?

    I know this is a unique situation to be in but any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

     
    Monday, May 11, 2015 7:24 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    If you run mountvol.exe - that will list all volumes in the system and their mount paths (drive letters or mount points)

    You can use this SQL script to list volume used by current installation of DPM.  Volumes not listed here can be deleted except the system and boot partitions or other local data drives.  

    select ag.NetbiosName as servername, ds.DataSourceName,vol.Usage,vol.MountPointPath,vol.GuidName 
    from tbl_IM_DataSource as ds
    join tbl_PRM_LogicalReplica as lr
    on ds.DataSourceId=lr.DataSourceId
    join tbl_AM_Server as ag
    on ds.ServerId=ag.ServerId
    join tbl_SPM_Volume as vol
    on lr.PhysicalReplicaId=vol.VolumeSetID
    and vol.Usage in (1,2) -- Replica=1, DiffArea=2
    order by ag.NetbiosName

    To make it easy to delete, assign an unused drive letter to the bogus volume using mountvol.exe - then delete it in disk management.  Example - assign drive letter R: to volume \\?\Volume{4f44e0ff-1f79-11e2-be82-2c768ae16487}\

    C:\>Mountvol.exe R: \\?\Volume{4f44e0ff-1f79-11e2-be82-2c768ae16487}\

    Then delete R: volume in disk management if it's located on the disk in question.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Monday, May 11, 2015 8:21 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi,

    If you run mountvol.exe - that will list all volumes in the system and their mount paths (drive letters or mount points)

    You can use this SQL script to list volume used by current installation of DPM.  Volumes not listed here can be deleted except the system and boot partitions or other local data drives.  

    select ag.NetbiosName as servername, ds.DataSourceName,vol.Usage,vol.MountPointPath,vol.GuidName 
    from tbl_IM_DataSource as ds
    join tbl_PRM_LogicalReplica as lr
    on ds.DataSourceId=lr.DataSourceId
    join tbl_AM_Server as ag
    on ds.ServerId=ag.ServerId
    join tbl_SPM_Volume as vol
    on lr.PhysicalReplicaId=vol.VolumeSetID
    and vol.Usage in (1,2) -- Replica=1, DiffArea=2
    order by ag.NetbiosName

    To make it easy to delete, assign an unused drive letter to the bogus volume using mountvol.exe - then delete it in disk management.  Example - assign drive letter R: to volume \\?\Volume{4f44e0ff-1f79-11e2-be82-2c768ae16487}\

    C:\>Mountvol.exe R: \\?\Volume{4f44e0ff-1f79-11e2-be82-2c768ae16487}\

    Then delete R: volume in disk management if it's located on the disk in question.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. Regards, Mike J. [MSFT] This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

    Monday, May 11, 2015 8:21 PM
    Moderator
  • Mike,

    Thanks so much for the help. The SQL portion worked great. The rest was not quite as straight forward as I would have hoped as there were 50-60 dynamic volumes and assigning a letter to each then trying to delete manually would have been very difficult. I was able to use powershell  get-volume to export to a CVS, and then export the SQL query to a CSV, use powershell to compare objects and get the differences, import them into an array and utilize a for each statement to delete the un-needed volumes. I have now reclaimed all 7TB of my disk! Thanks again for the help! 

    Wednesday, May 13, 2015 7:48 PM