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Daylight Savings Time & SteadyState RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all,

    I finally installed Windows SteadyState on 18 computers for our library and no major problems to report, however I had a couple of questions. 

    1.) How will the system update to the new Daylight Savings Time coming this weekend. Do all machines need to reboot for this change to take affect or will it occur automatically with no intervention.

    2.) The computers are to be on all the time, even at night.  During the day, when users are on sites like myspace.com, youtube.com, etc., the cookies, application data must get downloaded, right? Well, when the user logs off and the profile is locked, is all this data removed from the profile as well?  I would prefer that this happen, otherwise would I have to restart the machine using WDP to start fresh daily.  Currently, I have set no restrictions under the Features restrictions tab because I've noticed that some websites do not work properly.

    Please let me know ASAP, it will be a big help.

    Thanks for such a great product.

    Thanks
    Saturday, March 7, 2009 5:39 PM

Answers

  •  Hi waggypup_99, DST should work as expected if we enable Windows Disk Protection and we do not need to change the settings. For the second one, the answer is yes. If you do not lock the user, you can also use the restriction "Empty the Temporary Internet Files folder when Internet Explorer closes" under Feature Restrictions – Internet Explorer restrictions.
    Sean Zhu - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu - Monday, March 16, 2009 3:39 AM
    Friday, March 13, 2009 6:44 AM

All replies

  •  Hi waggypup_99, DST should work as expected if we enable Windows Disk Protection and we do not need to change the settings. For the second one, the answer is yes. If you do not lock the user, you can also use the restriction "Empty the Temporary Internet Files folder when Internet Explorer closes" under Feature Restrictions – Internet Explorer restrictions.
    Sean Zhu - MSFT
    • Marked as answer by Sean Zhu - Monday, March 16, 2009 3:39 AM
    Friday, March 13, 2009 6:44 AM

  • I am posting to the most recent thread regarding Daylight Savings Time synchronization in the hopes that someone in development with Microsoft SteadyState will put this on an enhancement/future-release wish list. I have 77 computers in a library workgroup environment, 38 of which are on an Internet booking system (which, now that we've migrated to another time management product, I am certain is not the issue). I've battled this problem with daylight savings time for about 7 years now, ever since the Gates PAC tool and the Shared Computer Toolkit.

    I won't go into nauseating detail about the problem, because multiple threads in this forum describe it pretty well. But for the most part all 77 computers, which are essentially the same image, have similar problems. Namely, they jump ahead one to two hours twice a year on DST day. I have to work on-site @ 2 library branches on these two Sundays every year to be certain that every single clock is manually corrected, then I have to reboot saving changes at least twice. I have tried many things, such as removing the checkmark that automatically updates for DST, pointing the PC to different time servers (which sometimes fail), scheduling automatic updates to run Sunday mornings, etc. I don't want to use third-party software because I'd have to pay for a product that prevents patrons from changing the settings.

    Here's my point: Could those of you at Microsoft please, please PLEASE work Daylight Savings Time synchronization into the next release? I have gone through all of the SteadyState forum hyperlinks at Microsoft regarding time synchronization, and some of it is overly-complex, time-consuming, and very worky. I need automated simplicity, especially since I am the only PC tech in our library and we are growing again next year (plus I have 95 staff PCs to support)! For now, if you could give me a script to add to SteadyState automatic update schedule, that would help.

    Sorry this is so long. Thanks for listening,
    PCC
    Monday, November 9, 2009 9:20 PM