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User Home Folder problem RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all, 
    I am using Home folders via profile, (\\FS2\Users\%username%) on a 2003 file server.

    My problem is that I different users calling every so often not able to see their folder.  When you look at their explorer, the U: map is pointing at the Users folder instead of the user's home folder. 

    The share permissions are:
    Everyone - Change, Read
    Domain Admins - Full
    Administrators - Full

    The NTFS permissions are:
    C/O - Special - Full
    System - Full
    Domain Admins - Full
    Administrators - Full
    No permissions inherited from parent

    Anyone know why this would randomly happen?

    Thanks,
    Mark
    Wednesday, November 5, 2008 9:22 PM

Answers

  • Try setting a Group Policy to Always wait for network at computer startup and logon.

    Using gpedit.msc, navigate to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/System/Logon

    Set Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon to Enabled

    Link the Group Policy to an OU or the entire domain (I personally would only link it to the OU containing my client computers)

    Run gpupdate /force and then restart each client or just wait for the next policy refresh and a logon/startup to occur

    From the Help/Explain text of the Group Policy:

    Determines whether Windows XP waits for the network during computer startup and user logon. By default, Windows XP does not wait for the network to be fully initialized at startup and logon. Existing users are logged on using cached credentials, which results in shorter logon times. Group Policy is applied in the background once the network becomes available. Note that because this is a background refresh, extensions such as Software Installation and Folder Redirection take two logons to apply changes. To be able to operate safely, these extensions require that no users be logged on. Therefore, they must be processed in the foreground before users are actively using the computer. In addition, changes that are made to the user object, such as adding a roaming profile path, home directory, or user object logon script, may take up to two logons to be detected. If a user with a roaming profile, home directory, or user object logon script logs on to a computer, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized before logging the user on. If a user has never logged on to this computer before, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized. If you enable this setting, logons are performed in the same way as for Windows 2000 clients, in that Windows XP waits for the network to be fully initialized before users are logged on. Group Policy is applied in the foreground, synchronously. If you disable or do not configure this setting, Windows does not wait for the network to be fully initialized and users are logged on with cached credentials. Group Policy is applied asynchronously in the background. Note: If you want to guarantee the application of Folder Redirection, Software Installation, or roaming user profile settings in just one logon, enable this setting to ensure that Windows waits for the network to be available before applying policy. Note: For servers, the startup and logon processing always behaves as if this policy setting is enabled.

    Good Luck!

    Mike Goddard
    MCTS, Microsoft Windows Sever 2008 Active Directory Configuration

    Thursday, November 6, 2008 8:44 AM

All replies

  • Try setting a Group Policy to Always wait for network at computer startup and logon.

    Using gpedit.msc, navigate to Computer Configuration/Administrative Templates/System/Logon

    Set Always wait for the network at computer startup and logon to Enabled

    Link the Group Policy to an OU or the entire domain (I personally would only link it to the OU containing my client computers)

    Run gpupdate /force and then restart each client or just wait for the next policy refresh and a logon/startup to occur

    From the Help/Explain text of the Group Policy:

    Determines whether Windows XP waits for the network during computer startup and user logon. By default, Windows XP does not wait for the network to be fully initialized at startup and logon. Existing users are logged on using cached credentials, which results in shorter logon times. Group Policy is applied in the background once the network becomes available. Note that because this is a background refresh, extensions such as Software Installation and Folder Redirection take two logons to apply changes. To be able to operate safely, these extensions require that no users be logged on. Therefore, they must be processed in the foreground before users are actively using the computer. In addition, changes that are made to the user object, such as adding a roaming profile path, home directory, or user object logon script, may take up to two logons to be detected. If a user with a roaming profile, home directory, or user object logon script logs on to a computer, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized before logging the user on. If a user has never logged on to this computer before, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized. If you enable this setting, logons are performed in the same way as for Windows 2000 clients, in that Windows XP waits for the network to be fully initialized before users are logged on. Group Policy is applied in the foreground, synchronously. If you disable or do not configure this setting, Windows does not wait for the network to be fully initialized and users are logged on with cached credentials. Group Policy is applied asynchronously in the background. Note: If you want to guarantee the application of Folder Redirection, Software Installation, or roaming user profile settings in just one logon, enable this setting to ensure that Windows waits for the network to be available before applying policy. Note: For servers, the startup and logon processing always behaves as if this policy setting is enabled.

    Good Luck!

    Mike Goddard
    MCTS, Microsoft Windows Sever 2008 Active Directory Configuration

    Thursday, November 6, 2008 8:44 AM
  • Iv'e been fighting fires for 2 days with down lines to half my branches.  Thanks for responding so quickly.  I'm a little ashamed I didn't consider this before posting. 

    Thanks again,
    Mark

    Friday, November 7, 2008 5:44 PM
  • No need to be ashamed! The problem you are having is intermittent and I could definitely see where it would be hard to run down the root cause of the problem. Good luck and let us know what you find out.

    Mike
    Friday, November 7, 2008 11:20 PM
  • Hi Mike,

    I realize that this is a pretty old post, but i was wondering if you have any insight into why this issue occurs?  I've got a desktop manager who would like to know the workings behind why this fix works before implementing on a large scale basis.  Thanks for the fix, btw, it seems to work brilliantly!

    Eric L.

    Eric
    Friday, December 18, 2009 8:21 PM
  • Eric,
    The detail section below pretty much details why enabling this works. In a nut shell when user logons Windows XP may have not fully initialized the network connection thus Folder redirection, Raoming profiles, and Software installation may not be able to be processed because the network is not fully available to it yet. Especially over slow connections. By setting this you are basically telling Windows XP to wait until the network is fully available before performing any of these tasks.

    Hopefully this is the explanation your Desktop Manager is after.

    Policy Explanation

    Determines whether Windows XP waits for the network during computer startup and user logon. By default, Windows XP does not wait for the network to be fully initialized at startup and logon. Existing users are logged on using cached credentials, which results in shorter logon times. Group Policy is applied in the background once the network becomes available.

    Note that because this is a background refresh, extensions such as Software Installation and Folder Redirection take two logons to apply changes. To be able to operate safely, these extensions require that no users be logged on. Therefore, they must be processed in the foreground before users are actively using the computer. In addition, changes that are made to the user object, such as adding a roaming profile path, home directory, or user object logon script, may take up to two logons to be detected.

    If a user with a roaming profile, home directory, or user object logon script logs on to a computer, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized before logging the user on.

    If a user has never logged on to this computer before, Windows XP always waits for the network to be initialized.

    If you enable this setting, logons are performed in the same way as for Windows 2000 clients, in that Windows XP waits for the network to be fully initialized before users are logged on. Group Policy is applied in the foreground, synchronously.

    If you disable or do not configure this setting, Windows does not wait for the network to be fully initialized and users are logged on with cached credentials. Group Policy is applied asynchronously in the background.

    Note: If you want to guarantee the application of Folder Redirection, Software Installation, or roaming user profile settings in just one logon, enable this setting to ensure that Windows waits for the network to be available before applying policy.

    Note: For servers, the startup and logon processing always behaves as if this policy setting is enabled.

    Wednesday, December 30, 2009 7:01 PM