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defragment problem win 8 pro RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • I opened windows 8 defragment program and did an analysis. it stated my drive was 11% fragmented so I let it run which it did for 3 hours. After I rebooted and everything worked as usual so I did another analysis on C drive and it still reads 11%.
    • Changed type Leo Huang Thursday, July 11, 2013 9:09 AM
    Saturday, June 29, 2013 10:08 PM

All replies

  • Defragment tool in Windows 8 enabled by default. So, it's not necessary to run one manually. Check your status after few days or use third-party software for advanced defragmentation (o&o defrag, for example)

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com

    Sunday, June 30, 2013 8:16 AM
  • I was using a diff defrag program and my system was getting gradually slower. So, I decided to check windows defrag that the other program had disabled. It's analysis stated 11% fragmentation. So, I told it to run windows defrag but when it was done, it still stated 11% fragmentation instead of 0%.
    Sunday, June 30, 2013 12:53 PM
  • How much free space do you have? As I know, defragmentation tool uses free space as a sorting area for file fragments. So, If you have not enough free space ( 10%-15%) , yout fragmentation won't change

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com


    Sunday, June 30, 2013 5:52 PM
  • How much free space do you have? As I know, defragmentation tool uses free space as a sorting area for file fragments. So, If you have not enough free space ( 10%-15%) , yout fragmentation won't change

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com



    Well, I'm pretty sure that's not the issue as I have roughly 1.2tb free. I ran windows defragger 2 more times and on the end of the second run it went from 11% to 4%. I'm guessing that if I do it enough it will finally get to Zero. LOL. It used to only take 1 run
    Sunday, June 30, 2013 6:28 PM
  • Defrag from Windows skips files which are larger than 64MB:

    In Windows XP, any file that is split into more than one piece is considered fragmented. Not so in Windows Vista if the fragments are large enough – the defragmentation algorithm was changed (from Windows XP) to ignore pieces of a file that are larger than 64MB. As a result, defrag in XP and defrag in Vista will report different amounts of fragmentation on a volume. So, which one is correct? Well, before the question can be answered we must understand why defrag in Vista was changed. In Vista, we analyzed the impact of defragmentation and determined that the most significant performance gains from defrag are when pieces of files are combined into sufficiently large chunks such that the impact of disk-seek latency is not significant relative to the latency associated with sequentially reading the file. This means that there is a point after which combining fragmented pieces of files has no discernible benefit. In fact, there are actually negative consequences of doing so. For example, for defrag to combine fragments that are 64MB or larger requires significant amounts of disk I/O, which is against the principle of minimizing I/O that we discussed earlier (since it decreases total available disk bandwidth for user initiated I/O), and puts more pressure on the system to find large, contiguous blocks of free space. Here is a scenario where a certainly amount of fragmentation of data is just fine – doing nothing to decrease this fragmentation turns out to be the right answer!

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/e7/archive/2009/01/25/disk-defragmentation-background-and-engineering-the-windows-7-improvements.aspx


    "A programmer is just a tool which converts caffeine into code"

    Sunday, June 30, 2013 6:42 PM
    Answerer
  • "File fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentation statistics".

    You can run from Powershell to see that fact

    Optimize-Volume -DriveLetter C -Analyze -Verbose

    But you can perform full defragmentation (including file fragments >64 Mb)

    1. Open CMD or from powershell with adm rights

    2. Type and run the following string:

    defrag C: /v /w  

    (C - is your drive letter)

    3. Also you can do a defragmention of boot files, using

    defrag C: /b

    OR just add /b parameter to step 2

    defrag C: /v /w /b
    After successfull defragmentation please provide your fragmentation %

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com





    Sunday, June 30, 2013 7:00 PM
  • "File fragments larger than 64MB are not included in the fragmentation statistics".

    You can run from Powershell to see that fact

    Optimize-Volume -DriveLetter C -Analyze -Verbose

    But you can perform full defragmentation (including file fragments >64 Mb)

    1. Open CMD or from powershell with adm rights

    2. Type and run the following string:

    defrag C: /v /w  

    (C - is your drive letter)

    3. Also you can do a defragmention of boot files, using

    defrag C: /b

    OR just add /b parameter to step 2

    defrag C: /v /w /b
    After successfull defragmentation please provide your fragmentation %

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com






    It was still 4%. I dl O&O defragmenter and it did the trick, now at 0% fragmentation. Thank guys. Now have to wait for microsoft to fix my hidden menu
    Monday, July 1, 2013 6:06 PM
  • Nice To hear! Noticed about O&O in post above. But I'm really sure, defrag with /w parameter is enough for the most situations

    Roman Levchenko, MCITP, MCTS http://www.rlevchenko.com



    Monday, July 1, 2013 6:10 PM
  • I have the same problem.  Started when I upgraded to 8.1
    Monday, December 9, 2013 2:09 PM
  • I have the same problem, 11% fragmented, ran twice still fragmented.
    Thursday, March 13, 2014 11:16 AM
  • The above command doesn't seem to do anything except evaluate and report.  How do you defrag? 

    Thanks

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 11:24 AM
  • Consider using the new PerfectDisk 13. You can use it free for 30 days. (Be sure to use the unique off-line Boot Time Defrag).

    Carey Frisch

    Thursday, March 13, 2014 7:18 PM