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Emails rejected by some domains RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have an exchange server configuration for a company with its on internal none routeable IP and internal domain. Occasionally when users send emails out they get #554 Transaction Failed. Spam Message not queued. The exchange server has an internal IP address like 192.168.5.5 and the internal domain name for the company is company.int. If I look at the message header of a rejected message it has the internal information like Received: from exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5) by exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5). The exchange server is behind a nated firewall so when it sends messages it sends from an internet IP address. The internet domain name is company.com and has an MX record that points to a service that receives the email for the company. Could I be getting these spam rejects because it is seeing the company.int domain name instead of company.com or the 192.168 IP address? If so how do I configure exchange so it is sending that information instead of internal info
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 12:19 AM

Answers

  • On Thu, 22 Apr 2010 00:19:12 +0000, earl23 wrote:

    >I have an exchange server configuration for a company with its on internal none routeable IP and internal domain. Occasionally when users send emails out they get #554 Transaction Failed. Spam Message not queued. The exchange server has an internal IP address like 192.168.5.5 and the internal domain name for the company is company.int. If I look at the message header of a rejected message it has the internal information like Received: from exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5) by exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5). The exchange server is behind a nated firewall so when it sends messages it sends from an internet IP address. The internet domain name is company.com and has an MX record that points to a service that receives the email for the company. Could I be getting these spam rejects because it is seeing the company.int domain name instead of company.com or the 192.168 IP address? If so how do I configure exchange so it is sending that information instead of internal info

    The rejection text says the other machine thinks your e-mail is spam.
    That usually a content-based detection. Since you have no control over
    how the other system deals with spam (or what criteria they user in
    deciding what's spam and what's not) you'll have to contact the admins
    of the other system and work it out with them. They may white list
    your IP addreses, or they decide that they've made a bad choice to
    include one test or another --or they may use the Exchange IMF and
    just have the SCL values wrong. It's up to you to find out from them
    what's going on.

    Anyone the trusts the "Received:" headers in a message that are
    inserted by any server not under their control is just asking for
    trouble. If that's what the other site is using then they're
    overly-paranoid and probably dumping a lot of "good" email. You
    shouldn't have to worry about IP addresses in Received headers if
    they're in the private IP ranges.

    Your server shoulf be putting a FQDN into the HELO\EHLO that's
    resolvable in a public DNS. That name should resolve to the IP address
    that was used to deliver the e-mail to the target system (i.e. the
    external IP address of your firewall, if that's what's doing the NAT).
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Xiu Zhang Wednesday, May 5, 2010 6:33 AM
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 3:17 AM
  • Hi,

    I agree with Rich.

    You may contact the administrator for thoes domains to solve the problem.

    Regards,

    Xiu

    • Marked as answer by Xiu Zhang Wednesday, May 5, 2010 6:33 AM
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 6:12 AM

All replies

  • Do you have SPF records set up?
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 12:52 AM
  • On Thu, 22 Apr 2010 00:19:12 +0000, earl23 wrote:

    >I have an exchange server configuration for a company with its on internal none routeable IP and internal domain. Occasionally when users send emails out they get #554 Transaction Failed. Spam Message not queued. The exchange server has an internal IP address like 192.168.5.5 and the internal domain name for the company is company.int. If I look at the message header of a rejected message it has the internal information like Received: from exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5) by exchange.company.int (192.168.5.5). The exchange server is behind a nated firewall so when it sends messages it sends from an internet IP address. The internet domain name is company.com and has an MX record that points to a service that receives the email for the company. Could I be getting these spam rejects because it is seeing the company.int domain name instead of company.com or the 192.168 IP address? If so how do I configure exchange so it is sending that information instead of internal info

    The rejection text says the other machine thinks your e-mail is spam.
    That usually a content-based detection. Since you have no control over
    how the other system deals with spam (or what criteria they user in
    deciding what's spam and what's not) you'll have to contact the admins
    of the other system and work it out with them. They may white list
    your IP addreses, or they decide that they've made a bad choice to
    include one test or another --or they may use the Exchange IMF and
    just have the SCL values wrong. It's up to you to find out from them
    what's going on.

    Anyone the trusts the "Received:" headers in a message that are
    inserted by any server not under their control is just asking for
    trouble. If that's what the other site is using then they're
    overly-paranoid and probably dumping a lot of "good" email. You
    shouldn't have to worry about IP addresses in Received headers if
    they're in the private IP ranges.

    Your server shoulf be putting a FQDN into the HELO\EHLO that's
    resolvable in a public DNS. That name should resolve to the IP address
    that was used to deliver the e-mail to the target system (i.e. the
    external IP address of your firewall, if that's what's doing the NAT).
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Xiu Zhang Wednesday, May 5, 2010 6:33 AM
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 3:17 AM
  • Hi,

    I agree with Rich.

    You may contact the administrator for thoes domains to solve the problem.

    Regards,

    Xiu

    • Marked as answer by Xiu Zhang Wednesday, May 5, 2010 6:33 AM
    Thursday, April 22, 2010 6:12 AM