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C: drive is again and again getting filled up itself!!! RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all, i have found out that my c: drive is getting filled up itself, it was of 64GB Total space but 37GB was free then this start happening. i tried to disk cleanup and then it showed me the free space of 37GB but after some time i again check the status it was again got filled up only showing free space of 500MB. i noticed that during disk cleanup the max space was taken up by "system error memory dump file" around 36.8GB. I also ckeck the %systemroot%/minidump after disk cleanup it is showing "no file exist". Any help will be greatly appreciated!!!

    Thank you all.

    Tuesday, November 6, 2012 7:32 PM

Answers

  • Sounds like an SSD.  The things filling the HD could be restore points, temp files, back ups, etc. DMP files (even when they are full DMP files) dont take up more than the memory you have in the computer 4gigs memory=4 gig DMP file.  Usually Systems are configured to use small DMPs (under a MB).

    You can get a trial of an applications called Treesize pro (by Jam software) to see what is taking up the space

    I will tell you a 64 gig OS drive is too small.  If you have 8 gigs of ram you also have a 12 gig page file, and an 8 gig hibernation file.  By themselves 20 gigs.  Then add a 64 bit OS and you are around 50 gigs.  There isnt even room for a backup


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Sysnative.com Team ZigZag

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Tuesday, September 24, 2013 5:24 AM
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 2:18 AM

All replies

  • Sounds like an SSD.  The things filling the HD could be restore points, temp files, back ups, etc. DMP files (even when they are full DMP files) dont take up more than the memory you have in the computer 4gigs memory=4 gig DMP file.  Usually Systems are configured to use small DMPs (under a MB).

    You can get a trial of an applications called Treesize pro (by Jam software) to see what is taking up the space

    I will tell you a 64 gig OS drive is too small.  If you have 8 gigs of ram you also have a 12 gig page file, and an 8 gig hibernation file.  By themselves 20 gigs.  Then add a 64 bit OS and you are around 50 gigs.  There isnt even room for a backup


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Sysnative.com Team ZigZag

    • Marked as answer by ZigZag3143x Tuesday, September 24, 2013 5:24 AM
    Wednesday, November 7, 2012 2:18 AM
  •  

    Hi, thanks for reply, i m using win7 with 32 bit and my ram is 2GB. Will you please tell me a step wise procedure of your information to make it work to overcome this problem.

    i m not a tech guy just a user so please make it easier to understand.

    thanks

    Friday, November 9, 2012 10:08 AM
  • E

    Did you get Treesize?  What troubleshooting have you done?

    For us to be helpful we need your system specs, the free space on the HD and for you to see what file is taking up the space

    You really need to get treesize.


    MS-MVP 2010, 2011, 2012 Sysnative.com Team ZigZag

    Friday, November 9, 2012 11:34 PM
  •  

    Hi, thanks for reply, i m using win7 with 32 bit and my ram is 2GB. Will you please tell me a step wise procedure of your information to make it work to overcome this problem.

    i m not a tech guy just a user so please make it easier to understand.

    thanks

    Emmaunel,

      1.  Unspoken rule of thumb:  The more memory you cram into windows the better.  Your sys is way under memoried.  Your probably lucky you can do any multi-tasking.  Get more ram.

      2.  Search either within these forums, or on the net for the "dism cleanup superceded (yada yada)" command and run it.

      3.  Anything you do on your sys is going to generate file upon file which does continue to increase the  size of your root directory.

      4.  If you're continually installing and un-installing, in addition to seeing #3 above, use windows Add/Remove programs.  Start>Control Panel>Add/Remove Software(Programs and Features).  This'll help keep the clutter down as windows remembers all entry/installation files/points and removes them.

      5.  Get additional disk cleaners, there's a lot of them out there for free that will supplement your maintenance procedures.  CCleaner is one that comes to mind as being safe, use the default settings.

      6.  And, follow the other posts in your thread, these guys know what they're talking about.

      7.  Do more research, cross reference the suggestions, you'll notice the ones that say the same thing are probably the direction you should go in.

    Seasons Greetings

    horatio


    horatio

    Thursday, December 27, 2012 12:03 PM