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Sysprep validation failure on 10586, possibly related to kb4013198

    Question

  • When building images for 10586 Enterprise CBB, I'm getting the following error from sysprep:

    "Sysprep was not able to validate your Windows installation. Review the log file at %WINDIR%\System32\Sysprep\Panther\setupact.log for details. After resolving the issue, use Sysprep to validate your installation again"

    Referring to that log file shows that the source of the error is:

    "SYSPRP Package Microsoft.WindowsCalculator_10.1510.9020.0_x76__8wekyb3d8bbwe was installed for a user but not provisioned for all users. This package will not function properly in the sysprep image."

    On different attempts the exact details vary - the previous attempt was a similar message about WindowsMaps. i.e. it isn't consistently Calculator that is the problem.

    These messages don't really say what's going on here, and they certainly don't say what to do about it.

    Where things get more confusing is that, in our environment, we automate the process of building base images, so the application of the original image, progress through later stages and eventual invocation of sysprep is all completely  automated, and neither the scripting or starting materials (10586 CBB Enterprise 64bit) have changed since this was last known to be working. Nothing has intentionally been provisioned for the current user or any user.

    However, we include a Windows Update cycle (and reboots until no updates needed) before invoking sysprep. The most plausible cause of the problem is therefore the latest cumulative update. Looking at the logs, this was KB4013198.

    Is this a known issue with trying to sysprep after this update has gone on?

    (I notice that the 14393 cumulative update released at the same time has "Addressed issue that causes the System Preparation (Sysprep) tool to fail" in its list of changes, but there's no mention of sysprep in the notes for KB4013198.)

    More generally, what is really going on that's causing sysprep to fail, and can we do anything in the scripting to detect this and fix it before invoking sysprep?

    Friday, March 17, 2017 12:38 PM

Answers

  • Just to clarify, I'm not talking about the upgrades to later windows versions - I know to avoid those when building an image. I'm talking about the latest cumulative hotfix for 10586 - the hotfix that takes it from 10586.753 to 10586.839.

    Sysprep works fine to take an image on 10586.753, and has done for all the earlier 10586.whatever builds that we've tried. This seems to be a new issue with 10586.839.

    As for clean installations, this IS a clean installation, i.e. starting from the vanilla MS image as a bare metal install. It is not an upgrade from an earlier build.

    On this specific issue, we've worked around it for the time being by blocking KB4013198 during the image building process. This allows us to build the image, but means it's only current up to January, not March (there was no Februray cumulative update). This is less than ideal but will hopefully be resolved for the next cumulative.

    As for including cumulative updates in the image at all, that is part of the point of building images - that they are as up to date as possible and have as little work to do as possible post-imaging. The fact that the latest cumulative for 14393 includes fixes for sysprep strongly implies that you are meant to be able to do this.

    Monday, March 20, 2017 9:54 AM

All replies

  • Hi ,

    >>The most plausible cause of the problem is therefore the latest cumulative update.
    Yes, you are right. Please note: Sysprep must not be used on upgrade installation types. Run Sysprep only on clean installations. But, install cumulative update will upgrade your system to a newer version of Windows. It acts like upgrade. So, do not install cumulative update before running Sysprep. Run Syrprep on a clean installed machine again, check if it works.

    Best regards

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, March 20, 2017 9:09 AM
    Moderator
  • Just to clarify, I'm not talking about the upgrades to later windows versions - I know to avoid those when building an image. I'm talking about the latest cumulative hotfix for 10586 - the hotfix that takes it from 10586.753 to 10586.839.

    Sysprep works fine to take an image on 10586.753, and has done for all the earlier 10586.whatever builds that we've tried. This seems to be a new issue with 10586.839.

    As for clean installations, this IS a clean installation, i.e. starting from the vanilla MS image as a bare metal install. It is not an upgrade from an earlier build.

    On this specific issue, we've worked around it for the time being by blocking KB4013198 during the image building process. This allows us to build the image, but means it's only current up to January, not March (there was no Februray cumulative update). This is less than ideal but will hopefully be resolved for the next cumulative.

    As for including cumulative updates in the image at all, that is part of the point of building images - that they are as up to date as possible and have as little work to do as possible post-imaging. The fact that the latest cumulative for 14393 includes fixes for sysprep strongly implies that you are meant to be able to do this.

    Monday, March 20, 2017 9:54 AM
  • Hi ,

    I may have misunderstood it, thanks for your clarification. Based on your description, it does be caused by KB4013198. Your workaround is effective. The simplest way is blocking it during the image building process. Thanks for your sharing.

    Best regards

    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017 9:30 AM
    Moderator
  • But, install cumulative update will upgrade your system to a newer version of Windows. It acts like upgrade.

    A cumulative update is not the same thing as a version upgrade.

    A version upgrade is something much more major, like the creator's or anniversary edition. The build number of windows changes (e.g. 10586 to 14393) and it is applied via the old in-place upgrade mechanism.

    A cumulative update is just a set of hotfixes to the current windows version. The build number of windows stays the same and only the revision field changes, and it doesn't go through the in-place upgrade process.

    So, in this case, I'm talking about problems caused by KB4013198, which brings build 10586 up to 10586.839. Those problems did not exist with the earlier cumulative update KB3210721 which brought it up to 10586.753. It's still 10586 in either case.

    There is no problem (generally) in applying cumulative or other hotfix-type updates as part of preparing an image, and in some cases cumulative updates like this may include fixes to sysprep (e.g. the latest cumulative for 14393). So you're clearly meant to be able to apply them. I agree that allowing full-blown version upgrades before sysprep is a bad idea, but that's a very different thing.

    In any case, one of the points of preparing an image is to have updates like that already included, to ensure that machines installed from that image do not have security vulnerabilities or large amounts of update work to do following installation.

    Tuesday, March 21, 2017 10:46 AM