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Why did microsoft end support for windows xp in april 18 2014? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Because its been too long that windows XP had updates.
    Monday, October 10, 2016 3:21 PM

Answers

  • More accurately, Windows XP was released in 2001. There are alternatives if you must use an XP system - such as Windows Embedded Standard 2009 and Windows POSReady 2009 that are still supported through updates.

    However, for XP itself, it is standard in a product lifecycle to have to discontinue support for obsolete items eventually - and for machines running XP still that cannot upgrade, there is not much practical use in keeping them in public service. I have seen some places use XP for POS systems - those can reasonably be moved to the supported embedded systems.

    Windows 7 and higher provides good compatibility for XP in terms of software; Windows 10 isn't as good in this regard, but 7 has had a very successful time (in the same sense as XP did) and in this day there isn't much reason *not* to upgrade to it.

    Hope this helps.

    Saturday, October 15, 2016 6:43 PM
  • Hi.

    Every Microsoft product has a supported lifecycle (here you can read more about that): Windows XP was released in 2002 and its lifecycle ended in 2014, 12 years later.
    When a software is too old, writing updates can require too much time and efforts compared to the benefits that those updates could add to the software itself, thus leading to the end of the software's lifecycle.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno
    MCP, MCTS, MOS, MTA

    Saturday, October 15, 2016 6:35 PM

All replies

  • Hi.

    Every Microsoft product has a supported lifecycle (here you can read more about that): Windows XP was released in 2002 and its lifecycle ended in 2014, 12 years later.
    When a software is too old, writing updates can require too much time and efforts compared to the benefits that those updates could add to the software itself, thus leading to the end of the software's lifecycle.

    Bye.


    Luigi Bruno
    MCP, MCTS, MOS, MTA

    Saturday, October 15, 2016 6:35 PM
  • More accurately, Windows XP was released in 2001. There are alternatives if you must use an XP system - such as Windows Embedded Standard 2009 and Windows POSReady 2009 that are still supported through updates.

    However, for XP itself, it is standard in a product lifecycle to have to discontinue support for obsolete items eventually - and for machines running XP still that cannot upgrade, there is not much practical use in keeping them in public service. I have seen some places use XP for POS systems - those can reasonably be moved to the supported embedded systems.

    Windows 7 and higher provides good compatibility for XP in terms of software; Windows 10 isn't as good in this regard, but 7 has had a very successful time (in the same sense as XP did) and in this day there isn't much reason *not* to upgrade to it.

    Hope this helps.

    Saturday, October 15, 2016 6:43 PM