none
hyper-v and a cisco router RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all,

    i am trying to work out how routing between VMs in different subnets will work in hyper-v.

    If each subnet has its own dedicated physical network card does this mean i could use a cisco router with a static route configured to route between my subnets? I understand a VM rras server is an alternative?

    Which would be best? Any suggestions please?

    Thanks

    Thursday, May 3, 2012 8:19 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    It depends.

    You can either use a router or a computer to provide routing for different subnets. If all the virtual machines are running on the same Hyper-V host machine, you can use a virtual machine with RRAS as alternative.

    Friday, May 4, 2012 1:49 AM
    Moderator
  •   A little more info would not go astray!

       If the virtual networks are external virtual networks (ie linked to physical NICs which are in different IP subnets) then a hardware router can certainly route the traffic between them. If the virtual networks are internal networks then you need a vm (with an interface in each internal network) to route between them, since a physical router will never see any of the traffic. The router vm can run any OS and any router software. A Windows client OS can do simple routing and Windows Server with RRAS will do just about anything you might need. If you don't have a Windows OS bulk licence the Linux PFSense appliance works fine in vms.  


    Bill

    Friday, May 4, 2012 5:20 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    It depends.

    You can either use a router or a computer to provide routing for different subnets. If all the virtual machines are running on the same Hyper-V host machine, you can use a virtual machine with RRAS as alternative.

    Friday, May 4, 2012 1:49 AM
    Moderator
  •   A little more info would not go astray!

       If the virtual networks are external virtual networks (ie linked to physical NICs which are in different IP subnets) then a hardware router can certainly route the traffic between them. If the virtual networks are internal networks then you need a vm (with an interface in each internal network) to route between them, since a physical router will never see any of the traffic. The router vm can run any OS and any router software. A Windows client OS can do simple routing and Windows Server with RRAS will do just about anything you might need. If you don't have a Windows OS bulk licence the Linux PFSense appliance works fine in vms.  


    Bill

    Friday, May 4, 2012 5:20 AM
  • thanks Bill just what i was looking for.

    These virtual networks are confusing me.

    So with an external virtual network i will need a physical NIC per VM (domain)

    And with an internal virtual network i will not need any other physical NICs other than the one that is in the hyper-v machine?

    Is that correct?

    Thanks

    Friday, May 4, 2012 12:16 PM
  • Hi,

    If you want to create an External Virtual Network, you have to bind it to a physical network adapter, this is an expected behavior. Internal Virtual Network and Private Virtual Network don’t need a physical network adapter.

    For more information, you can refer to:

    Hyper-V: What are the uses for different types of virtual networks?

    http://blogs.technet.com/jhoward/archive/2008/06/17/hyper-v-what-are-the-uses-for-different-types-of-virtual-networks.aspx

    Monday, May 7, 2012 6:10 AM
    Moderator