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Office 2013 customizations RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, looking for help to customizing the default Office 2013 install via OCT, registry or GPO with the following items.

    *** I am not interested in how to do it from the installed application on an individual client please ***

    1. Outlook: Navigation pane options / Maximum number of Visible items: 5

    2. Outlook: Add To-do Bar with Calendar and Tasks

    3. Outlook: Weather bar (the Allow Office to connect to the Internet checkbox)

    3b: Set Weather bar to celcius

    3c: Set default location, preferably depending on user office/location.

    Thank you.






    • Edited by Trana010 Monday, May 27, 2013 1:01 AM
    Monday, May 27, 2013 1:00 AM

Answers

  • these items don't seem to have ADMX nor OCT settings.
    it might be simplest if you use Process Monitor (or similar) to monitor the registry reads/writes on a machine where you check/change these settings to suit.
    the monitored registry keys/values could then be imported into a GPP Registry policy and applied.

    it's possible that these items might not be straightforward registry settings - the MAPI profile is a complicated beast.

    in my organisation, I would not customise the per-user settings down to this degree. I would leave this fiddling to the end-user to do.
    (I recognise that not everybody can have the "luxury" of telling IT management such things are pointless and dumb to deploy...)
    (I also admit that I am older and grumpier than I used to be ;)


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    • Marked as answer by Trana010 Thursday, May 30, 2013 12:30 AM
    Monday, May 27, 2013 10:40 AM

All replies

  • Sorry, I don't do that sort of deployment. I have collected references to some tools that may help you find the answer to your question.


    I believe the settings will be created in the configuration.xml file. I just don't know the specifics

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219422 - Office 365 Deployment Tool for Click-to-Run

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh852466.aspx - Office 365 Deployment Guide

    Deployment guide for Microsoft Office 2013 -

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mssmallbiz/archive/2012/10/22/free-microsoft-ebook-deployment-guide-for-microsoft-office-2013.aspx

    Office Deployment Support Team Blog (index page)

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/odsupport/

    Lots of interesting and useful “stuff” here.

     

    2013 02 25- Best Windows 8 Deployment Tools

    http://www.petri.co.il/best-windows-8-deployment-tools.htm

    Brief descriptions of Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK), MS Deployment Toolkit 2012, System Center Configuration Manager (CM) and Windows Deployment Service (WDS)

     

    Click-to-Run Customization and Deployment Deep Dive Part 1,2,3

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/04/17/the-new-office-garage-series-click-to-run-customization-and-deployment-deep-dive-part-1-with-high-g-aerobatics.aspx

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/04/23/the-new-office-garage-series-click-to-run-customization-and-deployment-deep-dive-part-2-workarounds.aspx

    how do I disable certain Office applications from installing. With the MSI you could use the Office Customization Tool to disable components from installing. In Click-to-Run you are installing at a suite or SKU level and to stop people from using them, you would need to first remove shortcuts to the unwanted apps. Then you can use things like AppLocker or similar tools to block executable files from running. If you deploy Office 365 ProPlus with App-V 5 you can prevent applications from installing as part of the Office suite.

    We also talked about language management and how you would use language properties in the Office Deployment Tool's configuration XML to download and install Office in different languages.

    if you don't have Windows Enterprise required to use AppLocker, Jeremy showed another way to block executables using the AppHelp Hard Block mechanism Windows uses.

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/04/30/the-new-office-garage-series-click-to-run-customization-and-deployment-deep-dive-part-3-integration-and-automation-with-software-distribution-tools.aspx 

    you can disallow user self-installation in the Office 365 Admin Portal and use software distribution infrastructure exclusively to ensure all Office 365 ProPlus installs happen within your LAN.

    "Can we put Office 365 ProPlus and Click-to-Run builds in our Windows images?"

    Yes. Whether you preinstall Office in your image then capture it or whether you install Office at build time with a task sequence, both will work. If you are installing and capturing the image, Office has been tested to work fine after running Sysprep.exe. The main thing to remember in that case is you want to install, but not activate Office. So the procedure would be to

      • install and customize your Windows image,
      • install Office using the "setup.exe /configure .\configuration.xml" process, 
      • run Sysprep.exe, then
      • capture with imagex.exe or dism.exe.  

    If you are using the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit for imaging, there is another important point to remember

     

     

    How does a company install and control licenses - Business

    Using Click to Run virtualization, the process of getting new users running has substantially changed. Because CTR installations are so fast, you no longer have to pre-install the software for users.

    A business IT Admin controls use of corporate Office 365 licenses through the Office 365 Administration Center online.

    Overview:

    - In the Office 365 Administration Center the designated Office Administrator sets up the new USER ID

    - Setup the associated email account(s)

    - Setup Office licenses allowed to the userid

    - the new User logs in to their new computer

    - in Internet Explorer the user goes to the “Office 365 Portal” site to get their allowed Office 365 installation

    - using the Click to Run installation process, Office 365 is installed and running on a new computer is a matter of minutes.

    The following links will provide you with more detailed information of where to look and what to do. You may require some additional support from an “expert” .

    Free MS training for Office 365 Administration Center / Portal

    http://office365support.ca/does-microsoft-have-free-training-for-the-new-office-365/

    Excellent resource to get you started administering your business Office 365 licenses.

    The first video, Exploring the Office 365 Administration Center  (9:32), describes how to create new userids, and to assign Office licenses to them. It also very quickly breezes by how to install Office.

    The second vidow, Office 365 Overview for IT Administrators  (14:00), quickly walks you through setting up new company and users.

    On basic setup page, step 3 “Set up User Access” provides links to instructions on how to set up new users.

    In Service Settings, Downloads, you can control what Office apps the user can download.

     

    Creating Users for the NEW Office 365

    http://office365support.ca/creating-cloud-users-for-the-new-office-365/

    This page provides more detailed instructions for setting up the new userids and granting them Office 365 licenses

     

    Configuring Desktops for the NEW Office 365

    http://office365support.ca/configuring-desktops-for-the-new-office-365/

    The following post will document how to setup a Windows 8 desktop for a cloud user for Office 365. I have already installed Windows 8 and created the local account for my test user. I have logged into the Office 365 portal and had the user change his password. The password for Office 365 and the password for the desktop are the same.

     

    Office 365 for enterprises: A tour for administrators

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/videos/office-365-for-enterprises-a-tour-for-administrators-HA102654955.aspx

    Office 365 for enterprises brings together the online services your business needs. To see how to set up and manage these services, watch these four short videos.

     

    Where did My MSI go - Deployment Video

    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/technet/en-us/office/media/video/video.html?cid=otc&from=mscomoffice&VideoID=670e3969-0509-4d3a-a8a6-ffbe526d3e6f&src=v5:endslate:related^play:related_0&from=shareembed-syndication

    10 minute comparison of MSI and CTR

    Touches on corporate provisioning in”User Based License Model Activation”. Users activate/deactivate, but IT still has control to deprovision the license (starting at about minute 8:15).

    Then in this video / article :

    http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/03/20/the-new-office-garage-series-identity-activation-data-access.aspx

    They again say the companies can still allow userid activation while maintaining control of the licenses through Active Directory

    <snip>

    Jeremy: So we showed the installation experience for a domain-joined computer where single sign on is enabled and one that is not domain-joined, but installs via the Office 365 portal. In the direct from portal case when you kick off the installation, you will see a file that looks something like this:

    Setup.X86.en-us_O365ProPlusRetail_24*****-45a2-4eeb-b06f-b14****189c8_TX_PR_.exe

    In a future episode we'll talk about all of the configurations needed to suppress completely sign-in, first run experiences and user prompts. IT admins have had to deal with these in past releases of Office, but now there are ways to automatically sign users in to Office 365 installs picking up their domain credentials. I also showed the effects of deleting the user account from the Azure AD store and how it put Yoni's Office into Reduced Functionality Mode (RFM) - even if Yoni installs Office on his personal devices using his organization's Office software assets, once Yoni leaves the org the IT department can deprovision his personal installs. That keeps software asset management cleaner and IT is in control.

    Yoni: Don't forget we also had Mark Russinovich on the show and he explained the security model for online services with Azure AD - in your car. It sounds like they are taking the defense in depth approach to harden the service. And you made him slum it in your car, Jeremy.

    </snip>

     

    Overview of ID, Authentication and Authorization in Office 2013

    <snip  http://blogs.technet.com/b/office_resource_kit/archive/2013/04/16/new-poster-and-content-roadmaps-about-office-identity-authentication-authorization-and-security.aspx >

    This page has links to 3 posters. The first poster “Identity and Authentication in the Cloud: Office 2013 and Office 365” describes at a high level how to control new user setup in a corporate / small business environment.

    </snip>

    <snip  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj683102.aspx  >

    This page also has a link to the same poster online (http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=38193 has PDF and Visio versions of the chart). As well, it goes into more detail with information like the following:

    … Because Office is a tool that is used by the same individual in two different roles, the new Office offers two identities with which users can log on to Office 2013:

    • A Microsoft account, which most people use for personal business
    • An organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft, which most people use when doing work for an organization, such as a business, charity, or school.

    The credentials that are used to sign in are recognized as either personal or organizational. That sign-in identity becomes the user's “home realm” and determines which documents the user has access to on SharePoint, SkyDrive, or Office 365 Services for a specific session. Each unique sign in identity is saved in a most-recently used list so that it is easy to switch between identities without leaving the Office experience.

    ….

    a personal SkyDrive can be mounted to an organization identity so that personal documents can be accessed at work or school without ever switching identities. Also, when a user authenticates by using an identity, this authentication is valid for all Office applications, not just the application he or she signed in to.

    ….

    Two logon types are supported when users sign in to Office 2013, a Microsoft account or an organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft.

    Microsoft account (the user’s individual account). This account, formerly known as Windows Live ID, is the credential that users use to authenticate with the Microsoft network and is frequently used for personal or non-business work, such as volunteer work. To create a Microsoft account, a user provides a user name and password, certain demographic information, and “account proofs,” such as an alternative email address or phone number. For more information about the new Microsoft account, see What is a Microsoft account?.

    An organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft / Office 365 account ID that is assigned by Microsoft. This account is created for business use. An Office 365 account can be one of three types: a pure Office 365 ID, an Active Directory ID, or an Active Directory Federation Services ID. These are described below:

    • Office 365 ID. This ID is created when an admin sets up an Office 365 domain and takes the form <user>@<org>.onmicrosoft.com, for example:

    sally@contoso.onmicrosoft.com

    • Organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft that is validated against a user's Active Directory ID. An organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft and validated against Active Directory as follows:
      1. First, a person who has an [on-premise domain]\<user> account attempts to access organization resources.
      2. Next, the resource requests authentication from the user.
      3. Then, the user types in their organization user name and password.
      4. Finally, that user name and password are validated against the organization AD database, the user is authenticated, and is given access to the requested resource.
    • An organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft that is validated against a user’s Active Directory Federation Services ID. An organization ID that is assigned by Microsoft and validated against Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) as follows:
      1. First, one person who has an org.onmicrosoft.com attempts to access partner organization resources.
      2. Then, the resource requests authentication from the user.
      3. Next, the user types in their organization user name and password.
      4. Then, that user name and password are validated against the organization AD database.
      5. Finally, that same user name and password are passed to the partner’s federated AD database, the user is authenticated, and is given access to the requested resource.

    For on-premises resources, Office 2013 uses the domain\alias user name for authentication. For federated resources, Office 2013 uses the alias@org.onmicrosoft.com user name for authentication.

    </snip>

     

    Office 365 Administration / Office 365 Administration Center / Office 365 Portal

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj819272.aspx

    This page summarized methods of administering Office 365

     

    User Account Management

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj819300.aspx

    Sign-in for Small Business subscriptions

    Users receive Windows Azure Active Directory cloud credentials—separate from other desktop or corporate credentials—for signing into Office 365 and other Microsoft cloud services.

    Sign-in options for Enterprise, Midsize Business, Kiosk, Academic, and Government subscriptions

    Office 365 for Enterprise, Midsize Business, Kiosk, Academic, and Government subscriptions has two systems that can be used for user identities:

    • Organizational account (cloud identity)   Users receive Windows Azure Active Directory cloud credentials—separate from other desktop or corporate credentials—for signing into Office 365 and other Microsoft cloud services. This is the default identity, and is recommended for small and midsize businesses in order to minimize deployment complexity. Passwords for organizational accounts use the Windows Azure Active Directory password policy.
    • Federated account (federated identity)   For all subscriptions other than Office 365 Small Business and Office 365 Small Business Premium, in organizations with on-premises Active Directory that use single sign-on (SSO), users can sign into Office 365 services by using their Active Directory credentials. The corporate Active Directory stores and controls the password policy. For information about SSO, see Single sign-on roadmap.

    The type of identity affects the user experience and user account management options, as well as hardware and software requirements and other deployment considerations.

    **********

    Custom domains and identity options

    When you create a new user, the user’s sign-in name and email address are assigned to the default domain as set in the Office 365 admin center. By default, the Office 365 subscription uses the <company name>.onmicrosoft.com domain that was created with the Office 365 account. You can add one or more custom domains to Office 365 rather than retaining the onmicrosoft.com domain, and can assign users to sign in with any of the validated domains. Each user’s assigned domain is the email address that will appear on sent and received email messages.

    You can host up to 600 registered Internet domains in Office 365, each represented by a different namespace.

    For organizations using single sign-on, all users on a domain must use the same identity system: either cloud identity or federated identity. For example, you could have one group of users that only needs a cloud identity because they don’t access on-premises systems, and another group of users who use Office 365 and on-premises systems. You would use add two domains to Office 365, such as contractors.contoso.com and staff.contoso.com, and only set up SSO for one of them. An entire domain can be converted from cloud identity to federated identity, or from federated identity to cloud identity.

    For more information about domains in Office 365, see the Domains service description.

    Creating user accounts

    Office 365 provides five ways to create user accounts, some of which are not available for Office 365 Small Business and Office 365 Small Business Premium: Add single User, Bulk upload using *.CSV files, Active Directory Synchronization, Azure Active Directory Module for powershell, Exchange Simple Migration

    Password management

    The policies and procedures for password management depend on the identity system.

    Cloud identity password management:

    When using cloud identities, passwords are automatically generated when the account is created.

    • For cloud identity password strength requirements, see Change your password.
    • To increase security, users must change their passwords when they first access Office 365 services. As a result, before users can access Office 365 services, they must sign into the Office 365 portal, where they are prompted to change their passwords.
  • Admins can set the password expiration policy. For more information for Enterprise and Midsize subscriptions, see Set a user’s password expiration policy. For Small Business, see Change how often passwords expire.
    License management

    A subscription to Office 365 is made up of a number of licenses to a set of services. An administrator assigns a license to each user for each service that user needs access to. For more information about managing licenses, see Assign or remove a license in Office 365 Enterprise, or Assign or remove a license in Office 365 Small Business.

     

    Office 365 for Business FAQ

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/business/microsoft-office-365-for-business-faq-FX103030232.aspx

    Some general questions are answered

     

    Deployment guide for Microsoft Office 2013

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mssmallbiz/archive/2012/10/22/free-microsoft-ebook-deployment-guide-for-microsoft-office-2013.aspx

    Free Download, 147 pg

    Table of Contents

    • Getting help
    • Volume activation of Office 2013
    • Plan volume activation of Office 2013
    • Volume activation methods in Office 2013
    • Deploy volume activation of Office 2013
    • Use tools to configure client computers in Office 2013
    • Customize installations of Office 2013
    • Customize Setup before installing Office 2013
    • Configure a silent installation of Office 2013
    • Create custom configurations of Office 2013
    • Office Customization Tool (OCT) in Office 2013
    • Config.xml file in Office 2013
    • Setup command-line options for Office 2013
    • Setup properties in Office 2013
    • Setup architecture overview for Office 2013
    • Customize the Accessibility Checker for Office 2013
    • Outlook 2013
    • Planning overview for Outlook 2013
    • Choose between Cached Exchange Mode and Online Mode for Outlook 2013
    • Plan a Cached Exchange Mode deployment in Outlook 2013
    • Plan feature customizations in Outlook 2013
    • Choose security and protection settings for Outlook 2013
    • Configure multiple Exchange accounts for Outlook 2013
    • Configure Cached Exchange Mode in Outlook 2013
    • Configure Outlook Anywhere in Outlook 2013
    • Configure junk e-mail settings in Outlook 2013
    • Roll out Office 2013
    • Install Office 2013 from the local installation source
    • Deploy Office 2013 from a network installation point
    • Deploy Office 2013 by using Group Policy computer startup scripts
    • Language in Office 2013
    • Plan for multi-language deployment of Office 2013
    • Customize language setup and settings for Office 2013
    • Add or remove language packs after deployment of Office 2013
    • Mixed language versions of Office 2013
    • Companion proofing languages for Office 2013
    • Language identifiers and OptionState Id values in Office 2013
    • Security in Office 2013
    • Security overview for Office 2013
    • Authentication in Office 2013
    • Plan for Information Rights Management in Office 2013
    • Group Policy for Office 2013
    • Planning for Group Policy in Office 2013

    Application Installations with Microsoft Deployment Toolkit 2102 Update 1

    http://www.petri.co.il/application-installation-microsoft-deployment-toolkit-2102-update-1.htm

    Overview of Click-to-Run for Office 365 (2013) setup architecture

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj219420%28v=office.15%29

    Provides information about the Click to Run for Office 365 setup process and design.

    Click-to-Run is a streaming and virtualization technology that is designed to significantly reduce the time that is required to download and use Office client products. Streaming allows users to begin to use a Click-to-Run product before the complete product is downloaded. 

    Managing Click-to-Run for Office 365 deployments and customization

    Administrators who are deploying Click-to-Run for Office 365 products can download the Office Deployment Tool. It allows administrators to stage and deploy Click-to-Run for Office 365 sources from an on-premises location. This is useful in scenarios where administrators want to minimize the demand on the network or want to prevent users from installing software from the Internet because of corporate security requirements.

    To enforce user software and computer settings for Click-to-Run for Office 365 (and Windows Installer-based Office installations), administrators use Group Policy.

    For more information about Click-to-Run customization, see Overview of Click-to-Run customization.


     



Monday, May 27, 2013 8:05 AM
  • these items don't seem to have ADMX nor OCT settings.
    it might be simplest if you use Process Monitor (or similar) to monitor the registry reads/writes on a machine where you check/change these settings to suit.
    the monitored registry keys/values could then be imported into a GPP Registry policy and applied.

    it's possible that these items might not be straightforward registry settings - the MAPI profile is a complicated beast.

    in my organisation, I would not customise the per-user settings down to this degree. I would leave this fiddling to the end-user to do.
    (I recognise that not everybody can have the "luxury" of telling IT management such things are pointless and dumb to deploy...)
    (I also admit that I am older and grumpier than I used to be ;)


    Don
    (Please take a moment to "Vote as Helpful" and/or "Mark as Answer", where applicable.
    This helps the community, keeps the forums tidy, and recognises useful contributions. Thanks!)

    • Marked as answer by Trana010 Thursday, May 30, 2013 12:30 AM
    Monday, May 27, 2013 10:40 AM
  • Docking peeks is in the registry but can be very confusing because each folder type has it's own set of docked peeks in 15 combinations. That's probably why it's not in the GPO.

    HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Preferences\PinMail (this is for mail folders)
    Value: 2 - calendar
    Value: 50 - calendar & people
    Value: 834 -calendar, people, tasks (in that order)
    Value: 1074 - calendar, tasks, people (in that order)

    Each folder has their own set of peeks - they all use the same values though, so once you get all the possible combinations, you can use them with any folder. eg, showing only the calendar in each peek is value: 2.

    The weather stuff is stored in the mailbox and is available on any computer they use.



    Diane Poremsky [MVP - Outlook]
    Outlook & Exchange Solutions Center
    Outlook Tips
    Subscribe to Exchange Messaging Outlook weekly newsletter

    Monday, May 27, 2013 11:59 AM
  • Thanks Diana and Don,

    So to answer my own original post:

    1. [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Preferences]
      "NumBigModulesAB"=dword:00000005
    2. [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Preferences]
      "PinMail"=dword:00000042
    3. [HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Common\Internet]
      "UseOnlineContent"=dword:00000002

    On 3b-3c I was experimenting with setting a WeatherServiceUrl REG_SZ in HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Office\15.0\Outlook\Options\Calendar\ with the wealocations=code and weadegreetype=degreetype :

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/jj228383.aspx

    But it doesn't appear to work like that, the weather doesn't come up unless I leave the WeatherServiceUrl with just http://weather.msn.com/data.aspx

    Tried tracking it with procmon, but all just Roaming and cache stuff.

    Setting the weather location I gather will be tricky from registry, OCT or GPO which is fine, its easy enough to add a location. But I am finding it very hard to accept that I am unable to select Celcius in the Calender options. I rather turn off the weather bar than make hundreds of users manually change to Celsius.

    Anyone else had any success setting the Weather bar to Celcius in the Calendar Options via registry or other?

    Tuesday, May 28, 2013 3:55 AM