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BlueScreen Error RRS feed

  • Question

  • Recently experiencing random bluescreen errors for a few months, approximately once a month

    Please Help!

    Problem signature:
      Problem Event Name: BlueScreen
      OS Version: 6.1.7600.2.0.0.768.3
      Locale ID: 1033

    Additional information about the problem:
      BCCode: a
      BCP1: 0000000000000028
      BCP2: 0000000000000002
      BCP3: 0000000000000000
      BCP4: FFFFF80003309BA0
      OS Version: 6_1_7600
      Service Pack: 0_0
      Product: 768_1


    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55110606/020414-28204-01.dmp

    https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55110606/WER-112663-0.sysdata.xml

    Above contains the .dmp file & .xml file Windows suggested that would help.

    Wednesday, February 5, 2014 2:44 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Use !analyze -v to get detailed debugging information.
    
    BugCheck A, {28, 2, 0, fffff80003309ba0}
    
    Probably caused by : memory_corruption ( nt!MiFindNodeOrParent+0 )
    
    Followup: MachineOwner
    ---------
    0: kd> !analyze -v
    **********************************************************            
                            Bugcheck Analysis                                             
    ********************************************************** 
    IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL (a)
    An attempt was made to access a pageable (or completely invalid) address at an
    interrupt request level (IRQL) that is too high.  This is usually
    caused by drivers using improper addresses.
    If a kernel debugger is available get the stack backtrace.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 0000000000000028, memory referenced
    Arg2: 0000000000000002, IRQL
    Arg3: 0000000000000000, bitfield :
    	bit 0 : value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation
    	bit 3 : value 0 = not an execute operation, 1 = execute operation (only on chips which support this level of status)
    Arg4: fffff80003309ba0, address which referenced memory
    
    

    It may be caused by misbehaving drivers. Please run Driver Verifier to detect indentify issues.

    Also,

    BiosVendor = Phoenix Technologies LTD
    BiosVersion = V1.25          
    BiosReleaseDate = 12/08/2009
    SystemManufacturer = Acer           
    SystemProductName = Aspire 5738                    
    SystemVersion = 0100           
    BaseBoardManufacturer = Acer           
    BaseBoardProduct = JV50                           
    BaseBoardVersion = Rev  

    Your BIOS version is too old. Please update to the latest version.


    Andy Altmann
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Monday, February 17, 2014 1:24 PM
    Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:23 AM
  • Chrislo7

    To assist you  in running driver verifier as Andy Altman suggests here is a wiki about how to do it.


    If you are overclocking (pushing the components beyond their design) you should revert to default at least until the crashing is solved. If you don't know what it is you probably are not overclocking.

    Driver verifier (for complete directions see our wiki here)
    Co-Authored by  JMH3143


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Monday, February 17, 2014 1:24 PM
    Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:26 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Use !analyze -v to get detailed debugging information.
    
    BugCheck A, {28, 2, 0, fffff80003309ba0}
    
    Probably caused by : memory_corruption ( nt!MiFindNodeOrParent+0 )
    
    Followup: MachineOwner
    ---------
    0: kd> !analyze -v
    **********************************************************            
                            Bugcheck Analysis                                             
    ********************************************************** 
    IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL (a)
    An attempt was made to access a pageable (or completely invalid) address at an
    interrupt request level (IRQL) that is too high.  This is usually
    caused by drivers using improper addresses.
    If a kernel debugger is available get the stack backtrace.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 0000000000000028, memory referenced
    Arg2: 0000000000000002, IRQL
    Arg3: 0000000000000000, bitfield :
    	bit 0 : value 0 = read operation, 1 = write operation
    	bit 3 : value 0 = not an execute operation, 1 = execute operation (only on chips which support this level of status)
    Arg4: fffff80003309ba0, address which referenced memory
    
    

    It may be caused by misbehaving drivers. Please run Driver Verifier to detect indentify issues.

    Also,

    BiosVendor = Phoenix Technologies LTD
    BiosVersion = V1.25          
    BiosReleaseDate = 12/08/2009
    SystemManufacturer = Acer           
    SystemProductName = Aspire 5738                    
    SystemVersion = 0100           
    BaseBoardManufacturer = Acer           
    BaseBoardProduct = JV50                           
    BaseBoardVersion = Rev  

    Your BIOS version is too old. Please update to the latest version.


    Andy Altmann
    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Monday, February 17, 2014 1:24 PM
    Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:23 AM
  • Chrislo7

    To assist you  in running driver verifier as Andy Altman suggests here is a wiki about how to do it.


    If you are overclocking (pushing the components beyond their design) you should revert to default at least until the crashing is solved. If you don't know what it is you probably are not overclocking.

    Driver verifier (for complete directions see our wiki here)
    Co-Authored by  JMH3143


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag

    • Marked as answer by Karen Hu Monday, February 17, 2014 1:24 PM
    Thursday, February 6, 2014 7:26 AM
  • Thanks for the reply.

    I think I would try updating the BIOS version first. I have went ahead to Acer's website and found 3 BIOS versions for my laptop. Do I have to download and update each or just the latest?

    Friday, February 7, 2014 4:31 AM
  • Thanks for the complete directions for me to follow on running driver verifier, and I am not overclocking my CPU.

    Friday, February 7, 2014 4:32 AM
  • Hello,

    Have you read the MEMORY.DMP file?  Microsoft has a utility to read them and it is very helpful.  I had a problem with one model computer that would randomly reboot and when I read the .DMP file, I found out the culprit was the NIC drivers.  You should find the cause of the error at the bottom of the dump file.

    Saturday, February 8, 2014 8:20 PM