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  • Question

  • Cam I use an internal drive (SATA 250 GB) with Ready Boost?
    Sunday, July 24, 2011 10:10 PM

Answers

  • No, you can't.  But even if you could, there would be no performance improvement.

    The reason ReadyBoost exists is to make use of fast, solid-state memory devices attached to a USB 2 port, instead  of your mechanical drives. Putting a mechanical drive in to perform this function makes no sense.


    If you found this post helpful, please give it a "Helpful" vote. If it answered your question, remember to mark it as an "Answer".
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:34 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:29 AM
  • Cam I use an internal drive (SATA 250 GB) with Ready Boost?


    See Bigteddy's reply, and let me add the following.

     

    Regardless of what kind of drive you use for ReadyBoost, it's highly unklikely that it would improve things at all. It's only of any value on slow underpowered computers.

     


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:35 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:34 PM
  • I would think an internal flash drive would help.  It's the i/o that's the bottleneck.

     

    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:36 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:45 PM
  • Hi Saddly 2000, you said..

    Cam I use an internal drive (SATA 250 GB) with Ready Boost?

     

    Readyboost is used as a cache between your HDs pagefile and your systems RAM..

    See this blog article (thanks to DominikBerger for directing me to this)

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tomarcher/archive/2006/06/02/615199.aspx

     

    also from this link I found some further info: (a quote below)

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tomarcher/archive/2006/04/14/576548.aspx

    •The USB Key must be at least USB 2.0
    •The device must be able to do 3.5 MB/s for 4 KB random reads uniformly across the entire device and 2.5 MB/s for 512 KB random writes uniformly across the device.
    •The USB Key has to have at least 64mb of free space

    -------------

    So even though you could use other devices for ReadyBoost you won't get any performance boost as BigTeddy said above.

     

    Regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:38 AM
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 12:56 AM

All replies

  • No, you can't.  But even if you could, there would be no performance improvement.

    The reason ReadyBoost exists is to make use of fast, solid-state memory devices attached to a USB 2 port, instead  of your mechanical drives. Putting a mechanical drive in to perform this function makes no sense.


    If you found this post helpful, please give it a "Helpful" vote. If it answered your question, remember to mark it as an "Answer".
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:34 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:29 AM
  • Cam I use an internal drive (SATA 250 GB) with Ready Boost?


    See Bigteddy's reply, and let me add the following.

     

    Regardless of what kind of drive you use for ReadyBoost, it's highly unklikely that it would improve things at all. It's only of any value on slow underpowered computers.

     


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:35 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:34 PM
  • I would think an internal flash drive would help.  It's the i/o that's the bottleneck.

     

    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:36 AM
    Monday, July 25, 2011 6:45 PM
  • Hi Saddly 2000, you said..

    Cam I use an internal drive (SATA 250 GB) with Ready Boost?

     

    Readyboost is used as a cache between your HDs pagefile and your systems RAM..

    See this blog article (thanks to DominikBerger for directing me to this)

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tomarcher/archive/2006/06/02/615199.aspx

     

    also from this link I found some further info: (a quote below)

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/tomarcher/archive/2006/04/14/576548.aspx

    •The USB Key must be at least USB 2.0
    •The device must be able to do 3.5 MB/s for 4 KB random reads uniformly across the entire device and 2.5 MB/s for 512 KB random writes uniformly across the device.
    •The USB Key has to have at least 64mb of free space

    -------------

    So even though you could use other devices for ReadyBoost you won't get any performance boost as BigTeddy said above.

     

    Regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    • Marked as answer by saddly2000 Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:38 AM
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 12:56 AM
  • ...Thank you for answering my question Bigteddy...
    Sylvia Johnson
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:35 AM
  • ...Also Thank you K Blake...
    Sylvia Johnson
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:36 AM
  • ...well I can use it as a back up too, Thank you JS2010...
    Sylvia Johnson
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:38 AM
  • ...WOW I'm so glad for all the responses! Thank you for the blog article and link, this was so helpful pkn2011...
    Sylvia Johnson
    Tuesday, July 26, 2011 2:43 AM
  • ...Also Thank you K Blake...
    Sylvia Johnson


    You're welcome. Glad to help.

     


    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP
    Wednesday, July 27, 2011 2:27 PM
  • Hi Sylvia, echoing K Blake. You're Welcome.

    btw. If you do get a FlashRam to install ReadyBoost - if it's 4Gb or larger format it in exFAT (32k blocks) to allow a file larger than 4GB for its cache. And on Win7 you can use more than one FlashRAM of differing sizes too.

    All the best, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    Thursday, July 28, 2011 5:24 AM
  • Hi pkn2011,

    How do you format using exFAT?  I've never heard of it before.  Sounds interesting.


    If you found this post helpful, please give it a "Helpful" vote. If it answered your question, remember to mark it as an "Answer".
    Thursday, July 28, 2011 5:50 AM
  • Hi Bigteddy, you said..

    How do you format using exFAT? I've never heard of it before. Sounds interesting.

     

    It's just the same as formatting in FAT32 or FAT etc. Go into the Context Menu(sorry) of the device via Computer and select format. The options appear there. I'm not sure if all devices support it. Nor if Vista supports it. I tried formatting a flashRam on my Vista 32 and ReadyBoost wasn't available on it. See this thread where I found out initially..

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itproperf/thread/ea41af2b-f61f-4419-8509-9581c568b65c

     

    Regards, pkn2011


    If my post was helpful - give it a Vote. If it helps solve your problem - propose it as Answer. ;-)
    • Edited by pkn2011 Thursday, July 28, 2011 6:25 AM Not properties - Context Menu
    Thursday, July 28, 2011 6:18 AM