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Server with Hyper-V configuration and SSD disks RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello

    I am interested in building a server configuration with hyper-v for demo purposes. (6-7 vms)

    In order to run faster the VMs and the core server,

    1) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive for the core ?

    I heard it would reduce the hard drive lifetime due to many writes and the performance is not so much greater than standards HDDs.

    2) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs ?

    3) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs considering I will be using Windows Server 2008 R2 on the guests ?

    I heard TRIM command is not implemented for old VHD and it is only reserved for VHDx (and Windows Server 2012)

    4) what is the impact of SDD lifetime in hosting VMs ?

    thanks a lot

    Chea-Lie

    Wednesday, February 27, 2013 5:59 PM

Answers

  • I cannot really make a official answer on this. But I am running server VMs on my Hyper-V host on SSD for like 1-2 years and never had a problem. Performance is just amazing.

    Yes you don't really need a SSD for the Management OS you can use a normal HDD instead but for the VM storage it's great performance. And why not use Windows Server 2012 or the free Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012 which includes all the feature of the normal Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V edition.

    Thomas


    http://www.thomasmaurer.ch

    • Proposed as answer by Thomas MaurerMVP Wednesday, February 27, 2013 7:42 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Wednesday, February 27, 2013 7:38 PM
  • Yes. I don't think expensive fiber SAN can compete with the performance of using 2 + or more SSD drives for the bare metal or server OS and the other drive for VM(s). Some would say you should dedicates a SSD drive to a certain type of app like exchange; or database tier host on one SSD and the app / web server host on another SSD.
    • Proposed as answer by jaybrubin1 Sunday, March 3, 2013 6:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Sunday, March 3, 2013 6:02 AM
  • Hello

    I am interested in building a server configuration with hyper-v for demo purposes. (6-7 vms)

    In order to run faster the VMs and the core server,

    1) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive for the core ?

    I heard it would reduce the hard drive lifetime due to many writes and the performance is not so much greater than standards HDDs.

    2) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs ?

    3) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs considering I will be using Windows Server 2008 R2 on the guests ?

    I heard TRIM command is not implemented for old VHD and it is only reserved for VHDx (and Windows Server 2012)

    4) what is the impact of SDD lifetime in hosting VMs ?

    thanks a lot

    Chea-Lie

    1) Waste of money. OS boots and after then most of the content is pretty much "ice cold" so a bad candidate for Tier1 (flash) storage. So if you want to save money you can boot from a pair of SATA spindles configured to run in RAID1 (mirror). If you're not short in money or want to save on power you can go flash for booting.

    2) If VMs are live then of course you'll benefit from running VMs from flash.

    3) OS does not matter. You'll compact VHDs if running them dynamic and trim flash from host OS (Windows Server 2012).

    4) Flash goes overprovisioned (more capacity used then reported to user) and has sophisticated log-structured design inside (trash gathering in background, write aggregation etc) so it would be very difficult to kill modern MLC consumer grade flash drive.

    For demo purpose I don't see why you want expensive flash. I'd go SATA spindle all-around + some mirroring software to have only two hosts in a cluster.


    StarWind iSCSI SAN & NAS

    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Sunday, March 3, 2013 11:24 AM

All replies

  • I cannot really make a official answer on this. But I am running server VMs on my Hyper-V host on SSD for like 1-2 years and never had a problem. Performance is just amazing.

    Yes you don't really need a SSD for the Management OS you can use a normal HDD instead but for the VM storage it's great performance. And why not use Windows Server 2012 or the free Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012 which includes all the feature of the normal Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V edition.

    Thomas


    http://www.thomasmaurer.ch

    • Proposed as answer by Thomas MaurerMVP Wednesday, February 27, 2013 7:42 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Wednesday, February 27, 2013 7:38 PM
  • We would be using Windows Server 2012 for the core but for the guests windows server 2008 R2 (cause the software needs 2008 R2)
    Thursday, February 28, 2013 4:16 AM
  • Yes. I don't think expensive fiber SAN can compete with the performance of using 2 + or more SSD drives for the bare metal or server OS and the other drive for VM(s). Some would say you should dedicates a SSD drive to a certain type of app like exchange; or database tier host on one SSD and the app / web server host on another SSD.
    • Proposed as answer by jaybrubin1 Sunday, March 3, 2013 6:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Sunday, March 3, 2013 6:02 AM
  • Hello

    I am interested in building a server configuration with hyper-v for demo purposes. (6-7 vms)

    In order to run faster the VMs and the core server,

    1) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive for the core ?

    I heard it would reduce the hard drive lifetime due to many writes and the performance is not so much greater than standards HDDs.

    2) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs ?

    3) is it recommended to add an SATA SDD hard drive to host the VMs considering I will be using Windows Server 2008 R2 on the guests ?

    I heard TRIM command is not implemented for old VHD and it is only reserved for VHDx (and Windows Server 2012)

    4) what is the impact of SDD lifetime in hosting VMs ?

    thanks a lot

    Chea-Lie

    1) Waste of money. OS boots and after then most of the content is pretty much "ice cold" so a bad candidate for Tier1 (flash) storage. So if you want to save money you can boot from a pair of SATA spindles configured to run in RAID1 (mirror). If you're not short in money or want to save on power you can go flash for booting.

    2) If VMs are live then of course you'll benefit from running VMs from flash.

    3) OS does not matter. You'll compact VHDs if running them dynamic and trim flash from host OS (Windows Server 2012).

    4) Flash goes overprovisioned (more capacity used then reported to user) and has sophisticated log-structured design inside (trash gathering in background, write aggregation etc) so it would be very difficult to kill modern MLC consumer grade flash drive.

    For demo purpose I don't see why you want expensive flash. I'd go SATA spindle all-around + some mirroring software to have only two hosts in a cluster.


    StarWind iSCSI SAN & NAS

    • Marked as answer by Lawrence, Thursday, March 7, 2013 2:30 AM
    Sunday, March 3, 2013 11:24 AM
  • Yes. I don't think expensive fiber SAN can compete with the performance of using 2 + or more SSD drives for the bare metal or server OS and the other drive for VM(s). Some would say you should dedicates a SSD drive to a certain type of app like exchange; or database tier host on one SSD and the app / web server host on another SSD.
    DAS is always faster then NAS/SAN. However it has major issues: lack of growing capacity up to some limit (SAN/NAS have more bays for scale-up and run clustered for scale-out), lack of features (live VM migration should be done by host over Ethernet and it's SLOW), no HA (unless DAS clustered and converted to HA SAN / NAS with a third-party software) etc. But if somebody's RTO/RTP can allow downtime then running VMs from DAS + having good backup plan is definitely a way to go. Fastest and cheapest.

    StarWind iSCSI SAN & NAS

    Sunday, March 3, 2013 11:27 AM