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What are the steps or any known issues with rendering MP4 files within MOSS 2007 enterprise/WSS 3.0 environment? RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are looking to render MP4 files within our MOSS 2007 enterprise/WSS 3.0 environment. What are the steps and are there any known issues?  Thank you in advance for your help.
    Monday, November 15, 2010 6:08 PM

Answers

  • Hi Hudson,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    Far as I know, these files such as mp4 and flv can not be crawled because they are video files. Similarly, they can not be indexed for search results.

     

    However, it is possible to index the metadata of all file formats. But you will not be able to index the content of the files.

     

    You can try to use add some third-party Web Part to display your MP4 files. For example: http://www.amrein.com/apps/page.asp?Q=5747.

     

    Hope this could help you.

     

    Regards.

    • Marked as answer by David HM Thursday, November 25, 2010 6:45 AM
    Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:21 AM

All replies

  • Hi Hudson,

     

    Thank you for your post.

     

    Far as I know, these files such as mp4 and flv can not be crawled because they are video files. Similarly, they can not be indexed for search results.

     

    However, it is possible to index the metadata of all file formats. But you will not be able to index the content of the files.

     

    You can try to use add some third-party Web Part to display your MP4 files. For example: http://www.amrein.com/apps/page.asp?Q=5747.

     

    Hope this could help you.

     

    Regards.

    • Marked as answer by David HM Thursday, November 25, 2010 6:45 AM
    Thursday, November 18, 2010 5:21 AM
  • Thank you Peng Lei. We did not know of this option so will check it out.
    Thursday, November 18, 2010 6:26 PM
  • Rendering MPEG-2, MPEG-4, or any other of the family of Direct Cosine Transform CODECs, there's a conversion process that takes place. The pixel data is bucketed into macroblocks (usually 8x8 or 16x16 pixels, but particularly in AVC, that's not the whole story). Then the DCT is run,w which translates spatial information into frequency information. This step isn't the main part in which your files gets lost or corrupt.

    Next comes the lossy part -- a low-pass filter is run over the frequency data, tossing out some of it. Sometimes. The bitrate, some of the VBR analysis of the "big picture" if you're encoding variable bitrate, etc. all contributes to shaping that low-pass filter. After the low-pass filter, there's additional stuff: lossless Huffmann or similar compression of the frequency data, etc.  When you recompress with the same or greater compression settings on identical material, you're pretty likely (but not guaranteed) that the AVC encoder is making the same blocking, bit-budget, and filtering decisions. Which means the video is going to change very little. And of course, you probably did something to the video in the process of editing: color correction, noise reduction, level or contrast adjustments, etc. That's going to change the encode-time decisions, but if you're doing your edits well, the bottom line is that the re-encoded video looks better than the original video.  And these days, we can often start with much higher bitrate video than we target, whether that's DSLR video at 50-100Mb/s, AVC-Intra or some other higher-end formats, etc. At this point, you're going to be essentially indistinguishable from RAW at the target video, aside from any processing errors (letting video saturate and clip, etc... most of which can be avoided by rendering with 32-bit precision). Given the higher quality video, you can also do things to ensure that the final encoding preserves more of the intended video, less of the bad stuff -- like light noise filtering, if you have a little digital noise in the image.  Back in the early days of compressed music, one of the figures of merit on the CODEC was the number of re-compressions you could stack without some level of damage to the audio. I recall, when MD first came out, Sony's ATRAC encoder could manage about 4-5 recompressions; by the time they were done editing with it, it could do 20-25.  

    Monday, February 13, 2017 7:24 AM