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  • Question

  • Hello

    Please describe me what is SSO? describe me in easy words and example. thanks

    Regards

    Friday, August 3, 2018 11:14 PM

Answers

  • Hiya,

    SSO or Single Sign On, is the process where users are only required to sign in at one source and thereby gain access to multiple systems.

    Your local super market provides "single sign on", to all the products available. You do not have to enter one shop for fruit, one shop for dairy products, one shop for dry foods, one shop for conserves and so forth.

    A bit more technically, you configure each the systems that you want to be part of the single sign on experience, to the same authentication application. An example of an authentication application could be ADFS, as it can handle multiple ways of sign in, thus making it more fleksible for any other system to integrate with.

    Taking the example from previously. You only need to pay with one type of payment, you don't need US Dollars for conserves, euro for dry foods, rupees for fruit and credit card only for dairy.

    Another benefit with single sign on, is that users only have to manage one identity(username). This is not directly Single Sign on, however it lies within the nature of single sign on, that you only sign on with a single user.

    An example of Single sign-on.

    You logon to your computer with your Windows domain credentials. You want to read the news on your intranet, so you open your browser and the Intranet greets your welcome. What you do not notice, is the logon to your ADFS, which happens automatically, because it users Windows integrated login, with automatic logon in Intranet zones. After a few minutes, you Skype for business flashes, your boss is writing you directly. He tells you that you should stop reading the news and get to work. Basically your user is here authenticated also, but you never see it, because it is using the ADFS server again, which passes your credentials to the Microsoft cloud service Office 365, where your Skype for business is running. Obviously at this point you open your Outlook, which takes forever anyway and you start by sending your boss an email explaining that reading the news IS working. Again you are authenticated with the Outlook application, which again is a Office 365 cloud provided application, which you are licensed for. (Again using the ADFS -> Office 365 validation, for both application and license validation)

    • Marked as answer by chapter 7 Monday, August 6, 2018 10:16 PM
    Monday, August 6, 2018 5:53 AM

All replies

  • Hiya,

    SSO or Single Sign On, is the process where users are only required to sign in at one source and thereby gain access to multiple systems.

    Your local super market provides "single sign on", to all the products available. You do not have to enter one shop for fruit, one shop for dairy products, one shop for dry foods, one shop for conserves and so forth.

    A bit more technically, you configure each the systems that you want to be part of the single sign on experience, to the same authentication application. An example of an authentication application could be ADFS, as it can handle multiple ways of sign in, thus making it more fleksible for any other system to integrate with.

    Taking the example from previously. You only need to pay with one type of payment, you don't need US Dollars for conserves, euro for dry foods, rupees for fruit and credit card only for dairy.

    Another benefit with single sign on, is that users only have to manage one identity(username). This is not directly Single Sign on, however it lies within the nature of single sign on, that you only sign on with a single user.

    An example of Single sign-on.

    You logon to your computer with your Windows domain credentials. You want to read the news on your intranet, so you open your browser and the Intranet greets your welcome. What you do not notice, is the logon to your ADFS, which happens automatically, because it users Windows integrated login, with automatic logon in Intranet zones. After a few minutes, you Skype for business flashes, your boss is writing you directly. He tells you that you should stop reading the news and get to work. Basically your user is here authenticated also, but you never see it, because it is using the ADFS server again, which passes your credentials to the Microsoft cloud service Office 365, where your Skype for business is running. Obviously at this point you open your Outlook, which takes forever anyway and you start by sending your boss an email explaining that reading the news IS working. Again you are authenticated with the Outlook application, which again is a Office 365 cloud provided application, which you are licensed for. (Again using the ADFS -> Office 365 validation, for both application and license validation)

    • Marked as answer by chapter 7 Monday, August 6, 2018 10:16 PM
    Monday, August 6, 2018 5:53 AM
  • Hello

    Office 365 is a example of SSO ?

    Tuesday, August 7, 2018 11:09 PM