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We are changing our DHCP Scope on our domain controllers but I need to know how to propagate those changes to the forest domain controller

    Question

  • Hello all,

    I am facing a new scenario for me. We are changing our DHCP scope on one of our domain controllers and I know the changes will eventually propagate to our other domains. My issue (hopefully wont be an issue) I was also tasked make sure these changes propagate up the change to the Forest domain controller. 

    We have 3 Forest Domain Controllers. ex XYZ.com

    FDC02

    FDC03 [PDC]

    FDC04

    We also have 19 I guess would be called sub domain controllers. ex xyz.xyzcorp.com


    Phil Balderos

    Friday, February 24, 2017 8:50 PM

Answers

  • ...We are changing our DHCP scope on one of our domain controllers and I know the changes will eventually propagate to our other domains. My issue (hopefully wont be an issue) I was also tasked make sure these changes propagate up the change to the Forest domain controller. 

    DHCP is totally unrelated to AD DS.

    Did you mean Site & Services / Subnets ?


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Friday, February 24, 2017 9:16 PM
  • Agree with Don. Just make your changes in "Site and Services" snap-in to help your clients find themselves in a right place. Default-first-Site.. isn't always a best choice.
    • Marked as answer by Phil Balderos Monday, February 27, 2017 4:00 PM
    Saturday, February 25, 2017 8:21 PM
  • Well my co-worker is changing a DHCP scope on our domain controller in Mexico and was concerned that the changes would not propagate to our forest domain controller. which kind of confused me because I am not the strongest when it comes to AD. Perhaps he was confused because I know I am.

    ;)

    DHCP has its own Fault Tolerance mechanism, if you implement it, but it isn't dependant/related to AD DS fault tolerance/replication.

    You *can* co-host DHCP on a DC, and in a multi-site scenario eg regional/satellite offices connected via WAN, you might have a server with multiple co-hosted roles on it.

    For DHCP fault tolerance, you might have chosen to implement split-scopes or whatever, so that if the regional office server goes down, client devices at the regional office can get IP addresses from DHCP over the WAN from your main site (eg some nominated server, like your forest DC for example.

    But, none of that scenario is using AD DS to do configuration nor replication - DHCP and your routers need to be configured for all of that.

    Sometimes, co-hosting roles on server, can lead to confusion about how the roles are communicating/replicating, eg if you are co-hosting DHCP and KMS on a DC, that doesn't mean AD DS is involved at all ;)


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Sunday, February 26, 2017 2:45 AM
  • Hi Phil Balderos,

    IP address is the foundation for services to communicate with each other. After changing the DHCP scope, we need to ensure servers could get the expected IP addresses and register necessary records to corresponding place. Also ensure the network devices could route packets correctly.

    Here is a blog about changing IP range, for your reference:

    https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/2013/03/02/so-you-want-to-change-your-ip-range-2/

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Marked as answer by Phil Balderos Monday, February 27, 2017 4:03 PM
    Monday, February 27, 2017 6:49 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • ...We are changing our DHCP scope on one of our domain controllers and I know the changes will eventually propagate to our other domains. My issue (hopefully wont be an issue) I was also tasked make sure these changes propagate up the change to the Forest domain controller. 

    DHCP is totally unrelated to AD DS.

    Did you mean Site & Services / Subnets ?


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Friday, February 24, 2017 9:16 PM
  • Well my co-worker is changing a DHCP scope on our domain controller in Mexico and was concerned that the changes would not propagate to our forest domain controller. which kind of confused me because I am not the strongest when it comes to AD. Perhaps he was confused because I know I am. 

    Phil Balderos

    Saturday, February 25, 2017 1:10 PM
  • Agree with Don. Just make your changes in "Site and Services" snap-in to help your clients find themselves in a right place. Default-first-Site.. isn't always a best choice.
    • Marked as answer by Phil Balderos Monday, February 27, 2017 4:00 PM
    Saturday, February 25, 2017 8:21 PM
  • Well my co-worker is changing a DHCP scope on our domain controller in Mexico and was concerned that the changes would not propagate to our forest domain controller. which kind of confused me because I am not the strongest when it comes to AD. Perhaps he was confused because I know I am.

    ;)

    DHCP has its own Fault Tolerance mechanism, if you implement it, but it isn't dependant/related to AD DS fault tolerance/replication.

    You *can* co-host DHCP on a DC, and in a multi-site scenario eg regional/satellite offices connected via WAN, you might have a server with multiple co-hosted roles on it.

    For DHCP fault tolerance, you might have chosen to implement split-scopes or whatever, so that if the regional office server goes down, client devices at the regional office can get IP addresses from DHCP over the WAN from your main site (eg some nominated server, like your forest DC for example.

    But, none of that scenario is using AD DS to do configuration nor replication - DHCP and your routers need to be configured for all of that.

    Sometimes, co-hosting roles on server, can lead to confusion about how the roles are communicating/replicating, eg if you are co-hosting DHCP and KMS on a DC, that doesn't mean AD DS is involved at all ;)


    Don [doesn't work for MSFT, and they're probably glad about that ;]

    Sunday, February 26, 2017 2:45 AM
  • Hi Phil Balderos,

    IP address is the foundation for services to communicate with each other. After changing the DHCP scope, we need to ensure servers could get the expected IP addresses and register necessary records to corresponding place. Also ensure the network devices could route packets correctly.

    Here is a blog about changing IP range, for your reference:

    https://blogs.msmvps.com/acefekay/2013/03/02/so-you-want-to-change-your-ip-range-2/

    Best Regards,

    Anne


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Marked as answer by Phil Balderos Monday, February 27, 2017 4:03 PM
    Monday, February 27, 2017 6:49 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks! I think that is the case. I logged into all 4 of our forest domain controllers and none of them are hosting DHCP. I think he was under the impression that changing DHCP on our DHCP server on a couple of domain controllers needed to be replicated to other DC. He is a network guy and was also changing DHCP on some of the Cisco Routers. He was confused and in turned confused. 

    Thanks guys!


    Phil Balderos

    Monday, February 27, 2017 4:00 PM