locked
Problem with Lab nvironment RRS feed

  • Question

  • I am working on implementing Steady State in a lab environment on a college campus.  Each individual users login on with account cradentials and it will create a new account for every user.  Upon reboot, it will delete everything and start new.  I hope to have each user have the same restrictions, but I can't seem to work this out.  Does anyone know a way that you can do this, create a default profile whose restrictions propagates to every user?  Thanks in advance.
    Wednesday, August 22, 2007 4:18 PM

Answers

  • There are a few different methods you can use to achieve this. 

     

    You can use the Default User Profile.  This method is described on page 54 of the SteadyState Handbook.  This is the simplest way, but the downside is when you need to make changes to the profile.

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=D64AF114-336C-4418-BEB7-E074E813B498&displaylang=en

     

    You can use Local Group Policy, but it presents the same problems as the default user profile and can be even more troublesome to update.  It is also harder to preconfigured application settings.

     

    If you are using Active Directory, you can use Group Policy.  The advantage of this is if you need to make setting changes you can make a single change to a policy and have it take effect on all the PCs.  Downside is pre-configuring application settings take a lot more work and knowledge of the Windows Registry and scripting. 

     

    You can also mix using the Default User Profile for application settings and Group Policy for security settings.

     

    Using Mandatory Profiles, I would not recommend this method in a university environment as the profile will follow the user around campus to any computer they sign into. 

     

    Hope this helps.

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 2:29 AM

All replies

  • There are a few different methods you can use to achieve this. 

     

    You can use the Default User Profile.  This method is described on page 54 of the SteadyState Handbook.  This is the simplest way, but the downside is when you need to make changes to the profile.

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=D64AF114-336C-4418-BEB7-E074E813B498&displaylang=en

     

    You can use Local Group Policy, but it presents the same problems as the default user profile and can be even more troublesome to update.  It is also harder to preconfigured application settings.

     

    If you are using Active Directory, you can use Group Policy.  The advantage of this is if you need to make setting changes you can make a single change to a policy and have it take effect on all the PCs.  Downside is pre-configuring application settings take a lot more work and knowledge of the Windows Registry and scripting. 

     

    You can also mix using the Default User Profile for application settings and Group Policy for security settings.

     

    Using Mandatory Profiles, I would not recommend this method in a university environment as the profile will follow the user around campus to any computer they sign into. 

     

    Hope this helps.

    Thursday, August 23, 2007 2:29 AM
  • Very much appreciated, I used the default profile way.  Since I was already messing around with the Default Profile so everyone had the same look, it was easy to put some restrictions to it and copy them over.  Thanks again.
    Thursday, August 23, 2007 1:21 PM